Best way to make this cut? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 06-02-2015, 02:54 PM Thread Starter
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Best way to make this cut?

Hello,

New to the site but thought maybe some outside insight might help. I am having a problem deciding the best way to cut this project i am working on. I have been using a belt sander and its just to time consuming.

Basically i have a material that is 1-3/8 and i need to leave 1/4 flat spot on the side then cut the remainder to a 45.

Ive been debating the idea that i need a inverted chamfer bit to cut with my templet but that is a expensive bit since it would be a custom build.

My next thought is using a straight router bit and building a a table which will allow my router to be at an angle.

Any helpful ideas?

heres a few picture to help describe what i am doing..the pictures are from the web of finished products, so i won't have any black grip on the board when it is being cut, just raw wood.
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post #2 of 19 Old 06-02-2015, 03:58 PM
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table saw with the blade on an angle would chunk out the material . A router could work with a jig, or just use a ^ shaped bit.

I wouldnt expect to get it right on the money anyway, just a very rough start to finish with sanding, or perhaps even a hand plane and then sand.

To be quite honest though, I would have thought an 80 grit belt sander would have taken that edge off in a few minutes.
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post #3 of 19 Old 06-02-2015, 04:11 PM Thread Starter
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i actually am using a 32 bit grit and it does the trick but it takes a lot of time and a good amount of effort. plus i would like to get things a little more exact so each one is the same.

I thought about a table saw as well, but the material is kinda shaped like an egg so i fear the table saw will not give me the finish i desire.

i designed this bit thinking it might work, running it on the bottom with a templet but its a little over $300 so thats kinda high just to see if it works. plus not sure if that is to much material for the bit since i have never carved out that much at one time with a router bit.
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post #4 of 19 Old 06-02-2015, 05:25 PM
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How about a spokeshave?
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post #5 of 19 Old 06-02-2015, 05:40 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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do you have a router table?

Shaping the edge of a skate board? Is the bevel angle critical ... could it be 45 degrees? A chamfer bit for a router comes in some standard angles:
http://www.rockler.com/freud-chamfer-bits

You would have to "freehand" the shape as it turns the corners, lifting it as it's required, IF I understand your issue....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMNKsa7reyI

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-02-2015 at 05:50 PM.
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post #6 of 19 Old 06-02-2015, 06:34 PM Thread Starter
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the problem with a regular chamfer is the placement of the baring. in order to keep a smooth cut with the router i would have to router from the bottom which is flat, my templet would have to be on the bottom as well. So i would need a upside down chamfer. this is why its a custom build router bit. But the cheapest was $300 for that bit.

this is why i was thinking straight bit and a table which would let the router sit at an angle?
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post #7 of 19 Old 06-02-2015, 07:02 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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search "tilting router table" ...

There are quite a few in this search:
http://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/s...&hsimp=yhs-006

This one from woodgears:


If memory serves, one of our members built this one:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 19 Old 06-03-2015, 12:00 AM
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hog out the majority with a grinder then switch to a ROS

Work smart not hard!
Never bite the hand that looks dirty
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post #9 of 19 Old 06-03-2015, 12:26 AM
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If you make a templet, make it so you can set angel and clam to base. Use a top bearing straight cutter in the router.
Imagine looking at the templet from the end and seeing a triangle with you board clamped to it.

If you want to get fancy, cut templet with curves so the bit pulls away at the ends.

Hope I'm making sense.
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post #10 of 19 Old 06-03-2015, 09:03 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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what about the bandsaw?

Tilt the table on the bandsaw to the desired angle and follow a line to remove most of the waste. Then a sander could be used to smooth out the cut.

Do they all need to be identical or is this a one of a kind?
For limited production a template is a better solution. The issue is most router bases are large and won't follow a 2 dimensional profile easily. You have curves in 2 dimensions, IF I understand the question.

Start the video at 3:00 in:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...Ksa7reyI#t=162

The Video shows a tall rub collar and a tall shaper cutter to allow for the changes in height from the template. The issue I see with your "custom" cutter is that it will trap the work between the router base and the cutter blades, meaning any variation will cause a kickback or a ruined workpiece. The workpiece should be allowed to "float" with any variation in height, and that can be cleaned up with another pass. The opposite will cause a "divot" which can not be repaired... IF I understand your issue correctly.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-03-2015 at 09:06 AM.
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post #11 of 19 Old 06-03-2015, 10:14 AM
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given the dynamic edge and the curve of the board.

if your doing more than like 3...

and want them to be remotely consistent

and if you plan to sell them with a reasonable profit for your time.

I see no other viable option than a CNC... I think 3axis would be sufficient.
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post #12 of 19 Old 06-03-2015, 11:18 AM
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What about a tenoning jig on the table saw? Holds the piece vertical and can be tilted, or the saw blade can tilt. Or both.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #13 of 19 Old 06-03-2015, 11:34 AM
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Based on that video, it looks like it's done with a quick round-over with a hand held trim router, then a belt sander to complete the profile with a buffer/sander to finish up. Not a critical profile at all.
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post #14 of 19 Old 06-03-2015, 01:14 PM Thread Starter
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A cnc would be ideal and would cut a lot of other things out of the equation but just don't have the money to invest in that right now.

I build a lot of these and have been for a while, its very different then a skateboard, so the video doesn't really do much considering the size and profile being cut are tremendously different on the sides. cutting them from the top is impossible because of the concave so any cut would have to be made from the bottom so the templet can be used.

i normally cut the shape from the bottom with a top baring straight router bit and a templet so thats why i got the idea of an inverted chamfer with top baring so it would follow the templet and produce an identical cut every time.

The jigsaw is a decent idea, but that still leaves a lot of hand work after and I'm trying to limit the amount of time and effort spent on each one.

A skateboard profile isn't difficult but these are wakeskates so it is built different in almost every way besides the pneumatic press.
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post #15 of 19 Old 06-03-2015, 01:25 PM
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Are the layers laminated together into the curved shape by you?

Perhaps you could cut the layers into the approx shape/size/angle before they are laminated and curved?
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post #16 of 19 Old 06-06-2015, 10:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings
There are quite a few in this search:
http://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/s...&hsimp=yhs-006

This one from woodgears:

If memory serves, one of our members built this one:
That's an interesting build.

[/I]Clearing the room[/I]
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post #17 of 19 Old 08-17-2016, 01:48 PM
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Inverted Flush Bit

Did you ever find a solution to this?

I am building skis and have a similar issue. What I am currently doing is using an inverted flush bit, just a normal 3/4" diameter bit, but the bearing is between the shank and cutting length. The router is mounted on a router table, so I raise the bit so that the bearing is level with the top of the table.

Using this method requires me to build an angled table-top jig at the angle I want the sidewalls the be cut. If you have questions about the jig I could try to post some pictures... but its really nothing fancy. This way I can use one bit for as many sidewall angles I want (but I have to build a separate jig for each angle).

I hope this makes sense...

But let me know what you ended up doing.
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post #18 of 19 Old 08-17-2016, 03:27 PM
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I believe since the angle is in the opposite direction of a bandsaw table tilt I would fabricate a table on a angle to mount on a bandsaw table and just cut it and sand it.
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post #19 of 19 Old 08-17-2016, 08:42 PM
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You've already started you said with a belt sander. If the going is too slow, change the belt to a lower grit. If you're now using 100 grit for example, move to a 36 grit. Things will go pretty fast.
I guarantee it.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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