Best 10" (with 5/8" bore) nail-cutting multi-purpose table saw blade - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 10-15-2015, 12:09 PM Thread Starter
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Best 10" (with 5/8" bore) nail-cutting multi-purpose table saw blade

I'm looking for the best 10" (with 5/8" bore) nail-cutting multi-purpose (able to crosscut and rip) table saw blade.

Suggestions?

Thanks!
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post #2 of 16 Old 10-15-2015, 02:46 PM
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Zero experience with these blades but here's a possible source; http://www.bladesllc.com/GS-steel-na...ng-blades.html The 29-01002001 probably would do what you want for ripping, not sure how good it would be at crosscutting.

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post #3 of 16 Old 10-15-2015, 03:23 PM
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Just how often do you expect this blade to need to cut nails?

George
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post #4 of 16 Old 10-16-2015, 01:26 PM Thread Starter
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Best 10" (with 5/8" bore) nail-cutting multi-purpose table saw blade

@GeorgeC

Not very often.

Just want to know that IF/WHEN I run into a hidden nail that I won't kill
my blade.

Suggestion(s)?
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post #5 of 16 Old 10-16-2015, 02:00 PM
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There's an inverse correlation to how well carbide can take & hold an edge to how well it can take an impact. There's a good explanation of this over at http://hardmetal-engineering.blogspot.com/

Basically, metal needs to compress in order to take an impact without shattering. For a blade, we don't want compression, we want stiffness which translates to sharp edges and high wear-ability. Carbide is one of the stiffest materials out there. Of course this is all kind of simplified for this discussion.

My suggestion is to get a good blade for most work and throw on an old cheap blade when you're using reclaimed wood, etc. That's what I do, anyway.
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post #6 of 16 Old 10-16-2015, 03:26 PM
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You're asking for 2 contradictory things. Anything sharp enough to cut wood well with shatter on contact with metal, anything tough enough to cut metal will be the wrong edge geometry for wood.

You'd be better served with a good wood cutting blade and a metal detector

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
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post #7 of 16 Old 10-16-2015, 03:27 PM
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I don't think you will find a bi-metal blade that produces satisfactory results. I also don't like combo blades. They suck at ripping especially thicker material, and don't cross cut very good. I use a ripping blade for ripping, and a crosscut blades for crosscutting. I use a metal detector to check any reclaimed lumber and usually use a junk blade that doesn't hurt my wallet if it gets destroyed.
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post #8 of 16 Old 10-17-2015, 07:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickDIY View Post
There's an inverse correlation to how well carbide can take & hold an edge to how well it can take an impact. There's a good explanation of this over at http://hardmetal-engineering.blogspot.com/

Basically, metal needs to compress in order to take an impact without shattering. For a blade, we don't want compression, we want stiffness which translates to sharp edges and high wear-ability. Carbide is one of the stiffest materials out there. Of course this is all kind of simplified for this discussion.

My suggestion is to get a good blade for most work and throw on an old cheap blade when you're using reclaimed wood, etc. That's what I do, anyway.
This is what I would do.

George
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post #9 of 16 Old 10-17-2015, 08:02 AM Thread Starter
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Best 10" (with 5/8" bore) nail-cutting multi-purpose table saw blade

Thanks for all the great advice!

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post #10 of 16 Old 10-17-2015, 08:03 AM Thread Starter
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PS: what's a good metal detector and where can I get it?

Thanks again!
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post #11 of 16 Old 10-17-2015, 10:04 AM
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Freud makes a metal cutting blade.

Howie..........
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post #12 of 16 Old 10-18-2015, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
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@HowardAcheson

Can't seem to find a metal detector made by Freud.

Have you got a link?

Thanks!
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post #13 of 16 Old 10-18-2015, 04:29 PM
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speed reader?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnDohe View Post
PS: what's a good metal detector and where can I get it?

Thanks again!
Quote:
Originally Posted by HowardAcheson View Post
Freud makes a metal cutting blade.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnDohe View Post
@HowardAcheson

Can't seem to find a metal detector made by Freud.

Have you got a link?

Thanks!
the Freud is a metal cutting blade....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #14 of 16 Old 10-18-2015, 08:19 PM
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Here's my metal detector. Finds everything, sometimes even the screw in the bench under it. Purchased on Amazon.
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post #15 of 16 Old 10-18-2015, 08:57 PM
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This is mine. Bought off amazon also. Has worked great for me so far.
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wish I had a cool line like everyone else...
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post #16 of 16 Old 10-18-2015, 09:04 PM
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I have a Garrett that hasn't lied to me yet.
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