Berkey & Gay - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 03-05-2017, 06:24 PM Thread Starter
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Berkey & Gay

Looking for replacements, anyone know where to source?
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post #2 of 10 Old 03-05-2017, 06:34 PM
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Why not glue the piece back on. Use a sanding block to remove some of the old glue and glue the piece back on with some two part epoxy. The wood is sealed now with the old glue so epoxy is needed. If you have a clamp then clamp the piece until it dries. Otherwise wrap some tape around it as tight as you can. Electrical tape or duct tape works pretty good for that. It's just with a clamp you would be more easily able to clean off any glue that might ooze out.
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post #3 of 10 Old 03-06-2017, 01:38 PM
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You will need to contact a hobby woodworking group to turn a duplicate
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post #4 of 10 Old 03-06-2017, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Why not glue the piece back on. Use a sanding block to remove some of the old glue and glue the piece back on with some two part epoxy. The wood is sealed now with the old glue so epoxy is needed. If you have a clamp then clamp the piece until it dries. Otherwise wrap some tape around it as tight as you can. Electrical tape or duct tape works pretty good for that. It's just with a clamp you would be more easily able to clean off any glue that might ooze out.
maybe our original question was unclear...it's like this...we will glue the caps in place once we have replacements. We are missing a few hence our original query. We need to either source new or turn new. any suggestions for either option?
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post #5 of 10 Old 03-06-2017, 03:47 PM Thread Starter
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thanks Tom. We've tried that route..surprisingly with zero results. we haven't located any groups in our area interested in the work. Would you happen to know of any within the lower 48 that would be willing to give it a shot? Shipping pieces to and from is not an issue for us.
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post #6 of 10 Old 03-06-2017, 04:04 PM
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I did a similar repair

I needed to repair the foot of an antique dresser, so I turned a similar section and paired like this:

The antique (circa 1936) bed rail project has led to more repairs/restorations,
The ball foot on the dresser was mising a considerable chuck off the back side, barely noticable until turned upside down. Other problems were loose joints just about everywhere, nails in the drawer glides that were loose and falling down, knots in rails that made them weak, a loose back, just nailed on. I think that if this truly was an antique, it would not have been made with such a shoddy construction. My guess is either someone made some temporarily perment repairs or the factory that made the thing was run by rough carpenters, maybe pipefitters, rather than woodworkers.
To replace the turned section of ball foot I had to turn a duplicate section...man I totally respect you woodturners....cut a section out to replace the missing one and epoxy it in. see photos.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #7 of 10 Old 03-06-2017, 08:52 PM
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maybe our original question was unclear...it's like this...we will glue the caps in place once we have replacements. We are missing a few hence our original query. We need to either source new or turn new. any suggestions for either option?
Will the piece you have fit any leg? If so you could maybe mail it to one of our members and they could turn some more. I could do it but it might be the May before I could get to it. Whoever makes it will have the piece to get the contours right. They would have to make that entire part of the leg and slice off the piece you need. Still you can expect to do quite a bit of sanding to make the patch work. Here and there it won't exactly match but be pretty close.
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post #8 of 10 Old 03-07-2017, 04:42 PM
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You might want to post in the Wood turning section of the forum.
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post #9 of 10 Old 03-07-2017, 07:53 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you Steve, that is a promising approach. The pieces are milled to fit all legs, with varying tolerance between each piece. There are in fact four styles of cap per each leg, with eight individual pieces of similar design per each leg, four pieces of two styles at the base, and four more further up the leg.
I'll move this posting over to the turning forum. In interim, do you have referral(s) to forum member(s) who may be interested in the work?

As a side note to this project; It is interesting to me that B&G obviously determined (for an as yet unknown amount of time)* that during production adding caps to squared legs in order to produce the turned look was advantageous over the option of turning each leg as one unit.
We all know turning takes time, however, one could imagine that the process of tasking laborers with gluing eight caps per leg, along with added time for shaping the separate styles of caps, and time for cleaning up the glued areas prior to finishing a single piece would take much more time. This thought is especially confounding when one considers the level of lathe automation B&G had at their disposal Cr. 1905. Having been in business 39 years at that point, financially speaking they were doing quite well. (estb. 1866, dba Berkey & Co.). For some reason which is unclear to me, it would appear that B&G exe's deemed the cap-gluing process the more productive option. Any thoughts (or factual knowledge) out there on this?

*Unknown to me.
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post #10 of 10 Old 03-07-2017, 07:54 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Quickstep, so noted.
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