Belt Sander or some other tool - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 30 Old 04-16-2015, 09:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hwebb99 View Post
That is about all a hand held power planer is good for, but a well set up hand plane is very useful.
A good hand plane is necessary in the shop, but the hand plane is the most difficult of all hand tools to master. Hand planes have ruined more projects than belt sanders for the novice..
The hand plane must be kept sharp and adjusted and can easily be knocked from adjustment or dulled if not treated gingerly.
Sharpening the hand plane is another skill.
A complete set of good hand planes will cost as much as a large power tool.
I can't imagine building furniture before the days of power tools.
Those guys were truly craftsmen.

Last edited by Toolman50; 04-16-2015 at 09:51 AM.
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post #22 of 30 Old 04-16-2015, 10:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
A good hand plane is necessary in the shop, but the hand plane is the most difficult of all hand tools to master. Hand planes have ruined more projects than belt sanders for the novice..
The hand plane must be kept sharp and adjusted and can easily be knocked from adjustment or dulled if not treated gingerly.
Sharpening the hand plane is another skill.
A complete set of good hand planes will cost as much as a large power tool.
I can't imagine building furniture before the days of power tools.
Those guys were truly craftsmen.
I was talking about a powered hand planer. A hand plane is very useful.
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post #23 of 30 Old 04-17-2015, 03:03 PM Thread Starter
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I think I could afford to buy a jointer OR a power planer but not both. That's down the road a little.

If I work with stock that I buy from the hardware store that's already reasonably dimensioned, could I get away with using a power hand planer and my table saw or router table for now?

My brother in law built his first project, a kitchen table, and it turned out really nice. He said he used a power planer to get the to really flat. He swore by it.

However, everyone else says the power planer (hand held) is not the right tool for this job. Since u can set the planer to a specific height, why couldn't it be used to run the length of the board or top from end to end to get an even plane?
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post #24 of 30 Old 04-17-2015, 03:21 PM
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Maybe he has a magic touch, maybe he got lucky, maybe your standards of success are lower (I dont mean that as a derogatory remark).

I would expect a hand power planer to take out small bumps in the surface but leave larger more gradual hills and valleys. I would also expect to have faint lines between the passes. If we are talking about achieving a "perfect" finish, I think it would fall short.

In truth, for a table top, a 13" lunch box planer isnt going to get you all the way home, nor will a jointer. you can plane the individual planks, and you will joint them for the mating surfaces. but after that, nothing short of a huge industrial machine will have the capacity you need, and that is ultimately the solution, glue up your panel and haul it to a mill for them to plane and sand perfectly flat. probably cost 50 bucks or something.

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post #25 of 30 Old 04-17-2015, 04:11 PM Thread Starter
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I don't know how he did it, but he got the top very flat. I have a picture on my other phone. But he used the hand planer to flatten the glued up top
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post #26 of 30 Old 04-17-2015, 05:22 PM
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table tops or doors.. no big difference

I used a hand plane, belt sander and powered hand plane on this door build:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/do...1-4-ply-55717/

I got it pretty darn flat by checking constantly with a steel straight edge and by marking the high spots with a dark pencil. A lot is experience and technique, something you will gain over time with practice. Both a belt sander and a hand help power plane will get you in trouble quickly if you don't know what you are doing.....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #27 of 30 Old 04-17-2015, 07:18 PM
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There is a deference between a powered hand planer and a powered planer. A planer is almost essential to a wood shop. A powered hand planer is only useful for very crude construction work.
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post #28 of 30 Old 04-17-2015, 08:26 PM
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the confusion arises because...

Quote:
Originally Posted by hwebb99 View Post
There is a deference between a powered hand planer and a powered planer. A planer is almost essential to a wood shop. A powered hand planer is only useful for very crude construction work.

A powered hand plane vs a thickness planer. These are the preferred terms, but most often "thickness" is omitted in the nomenclature for expediency.

The same goes for a "jointer/planer" most often used to describe a jointer by Craftsman or Sears when they are referring to a jointer. This is carried over into the ads on Craig's List for the same tool.

Jointers "plane" off the bottom of a board, thickness planers "plane" off the top to a uniform thickness. So it's no wonder novices get confused by the terms and the actual operations each machine will perform....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #29 of 30 Old 04-18-2015, 11:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plankwalker View Post
I don't know how he did it, but he got the top very flat. I have a picture on my other phone. But he used the hand planer to flatten the glued up top
Often it is the hands holding the tool that determine the quality of the job, many tops have been flattened with hand planes, the powered one works on the same principle so it would be possible.

Tops can be flattened with a hand held belt sander as well, if you know what you are doing. For instance first rule of sanding is to follow the grain direction, not so with a belt sander, you work across the grain to get it flat.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #30 of 30 Old 04-20-2015, 06:50 AM
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Think of belt "sanders" sort of in the same way you look at planes.......in one,not so small way.The longer the bed,the better "chance" you'll have at getting something dead nuts straight.

"Chance" because,with both it's pretty much a one shot deal.Take too much off in one spot because the length of bed makes it durn near impossible not to "gouge".....and it's gonna prove difficult putting that material back on.

So comparing a hand held belt "sander" to say a loooong edge sander isn't really a fair comparo.A belt sander.....like block planes are really high skill pcs of kit.And "chances" are.....most beginners do more harm than good.Don't put yourself in that position,duh.Look at the project from the perspective of skill building.Where do I gain experience with this new tool where it'll do the least amt of "damage"?With a belt "sander"....is that in the middle of the top on an antique dining rm table?Might ought to start somewhere a little less conspicuous.....yes/no?

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
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