beginner question on sharpening stones - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 07:02 PM Thread Starter
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beginner question on sharpening stones

hey guys i have a few questions about some Japanese sharpening stones. I am looking to purchase multiple stones but id also like to not spend a fortune. I read that 'king' make pretty good stones. Im not trying to spam this at all but i just want to know if anyone has used these particular stones ( if their good im going to order the 220-6000 grit stones), are they a good deal/price, are there any others that might be better without a crazy price.

thanks again guys


http://www.ebay.com/itm/221463181905
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post #2 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 07:06 PM
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Great for fine woodworking tools. They will require a stone to keep them tuned and flat. Be sure you learn one of just a few ways to use that type of stone as they require special care.

Al

pretty sure I'm going to need to get the popcorn cookin.


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post #3 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 07:34 PM
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So how many of you prefer to use sand paper vs stones? I really need to buy some supplies to sharpen my chisels one of these days.....

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #4 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 07:54 PM
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Three replies into the thread and it's a hijack. I knew I was going to need this popcorn.

Al


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post #5 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 07:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Domenic Dinezio
hey guys i have a few questions about some Japanese sharpening stones. I am looking to purchase multiple stones but id also like to not spend a fortune. I read that 'king' make pretty good stones. Im not trying to spam this at all but i just want to know if anyone has used these particular stones ( if their good im going to order the 220-6000 grit stones), are they a good deal/price, are there any others that might be better without a crazy price.

thanks again guys

http://www.ebay.com/itm/221463181905
Here's a good page to read through to help you decide on your purchase.

http://www.fine-tools.com/G10005.htm

Al


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post #6 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 08:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer View Post
Three replies into the thread and it's a hijack. I knew I was going to need this popcorn.

Al
Calm the heck down Al, there's no Hijack, I'm expanding on the question of sharpening....if stones are the way to go, I'm all up for a discussion of stones...

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #7 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 08:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan50hrl

Calm the heck down Al, there's no Hijack, I'm expanding on the question of sharpening....if stones are the way to go, I'm all up for a discussion of stones...
Silly and disrespectful of you to tell me to calm down. You posted the most typical hijack post. Didn't address the OP,disregarded his query and invited a group to your hijack.

Al


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post #8 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 08:21 PM
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Yes...because we can't have a discussion about sharpening methods in a thread about sharpening implements....especially when the OP mentions that he's looking to sharpen without spending a fortune...

And Al, I respect those that respect me as well.....Look in the mirror....the funny part about this is that I was interested in your opinion on sharpening methods......guess I expected too much.

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post #9 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 08:29 PM
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Domenic

I looked at the EBay deal. The price is so low I would worry. Unless the price of these types of stones has dropped off lately. Probably the reasons are because they are a little short, narrow, and thin. They are mounted to a board and these normally don't come mounted to anything. What your going to sharpen has a lot to do with the type and size.

Al


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post #10 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 08:58 PM
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I can't tell from the link if the stones on ebay are natural or synthetic stones. I have a hunch they are synthetic stones I wouldn't care for. I only use natural Arkansas stones which I use and keep in water. Natural stones will remain consistent for a lifetime. The stones I have I bought in 1977 and are the same as the day I bought them. I'm sure natural Japanese stones would perform in the same manor.
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post #11 of 26 Old 12-17-2014, 10:44 PM
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I have the King stone

I've had and used often a "King" combination cermic wetstone which I use in conjuntion with a benchtop wet grinder and stropping wheel. It's manmade material, I believe, but it works great.

I wouldn't have much use for the 220 grit stone as I have the wet grinder which can bring cutting edges ready for a finer grit. After forty years of use I can't remember what the grits are and any markings have long been obliterated. I would ventrue a guess that i'ts 600-2000.

The ceramic stones are very different than man made oil-stones or natural arkansas but in my opinionthey cut much faster. I think if you are after that magnificint perfect edge, hard arkansas might be a better choice. I like my King stone and I used the coarse side more before I got the wet grinder now I mostly just use the fine grit side and mostly with the flat side of a chisle or plane iron for the final burr removal.

They cut quick but are soft and can gouge easily with the tool you are sharpening if it catches an edge. You have to take care to use the whole surface of the stone or you will soon create a crater. When that happens they can be easily lapped flat again using sandpaper on a piece of polished granite slab.

I don't know what a good price would be. I bought mine retail and never regreted it.

Bret

Last edited by Lola Ranch; 12-17-2014 at 10:47 PM. Reason: typos
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post #12 of 26 Old 12-18-2014, 10:07 AM
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I agree with Al on this - the price seems way low. King stones are low end price wise, but $10 for 4 grits doesn't seem right. Here's an example from a reputable supplier -

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kingstones.html

Dave in CT, USA
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post #13 of 26 Old 12-18-2014, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
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thanks guys, glad I held off on the purchase. I am going to look more into those natural stones such as Arkansas. My father and I purchased some old Stanley hand planes along with some chisels that both need to but sharpened so Id like to make the purchase within a few days. thanks again.
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post #14 of 26 Old 12-18-2014, 04:37 PM
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I have a 1000/6000 combination stone and it works very well.It needs flattening from time to time and is easily gouged,but the mirror like finish on the honed surface cuts better than any other I have ever used.Like all stones,they need to be soaked before use and kept wet.
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post #15 of 26 Old 12-18-2014, 07:27 PM Thread Starter
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fareastern, your 1000/6000 stone, is that made by king? or is it a different maker?
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post #16 of 26 Old 12-18-2014, 09:21 PM
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A lot of people use King stones. A lot of people sell them to move on to something better. Anywhere from those, to Nortons, to Sigmas, to Chosera or Naniwa Snow White. There are many ways to sharpen. It's certainly not a bad start, to start with the Kings.

It seems like most beginners will put two hundred dollars in a set of chisels, and fifty bucks in some sharpening stones. I always suggest to put fifty bucks in some chisels, and two hundred in sharpening stuff. The sharpness is what allows you to do fine work, not the fanciness of the chisel.

Oilstones, waterstones, diamond, film, or ceramic-they can all produce a plenty sharp enough edge for you.

I like to go the 8,000 or 10,000 on a water stone. 6k or even 3k is workable for different workers.
I flatten my waterstones on a granite surface plate with sandpaper. A lot of people buy a diamond stone to flatten theirs on. Whatever waterstones you get, you will need some method to flatten them. They all wear fairly quickly, relative to oilstones, or ceramic.

I started with Arkansas stones. They work just fine, only slower than waterstones. I still use them in a cold work space.

Last edited by Tom King; 12-18-2014 at 10:53 PM.
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post #17 of 26 Old 12-19-2014, 07:40 AM
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I am not familiar with the Japanese stones. That price does seem quite cheap for a good stone, even an artificial one.

For serious sharpening I have always used ARKANSAS STONES

This link is a good reference to show the type of stones available. Those prices can be beat by judicious shopping.

Many (most?) people consider the Arkansas Stone to the the best sharpening system.

George
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post #18 of 26 Old 12-19-2014, 03:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Domenic Dinezio View Post
fareastern, your 1000/6000 stone, is that made by king? or is it a different maker?
I can't honestly remember.The current stone is eight or nine years old and still works well.

I don't see that you can really go wrong with a very low price water stone as you will only be out a small amount of money if the particular brand is not top-notch.The ability to get a good edge is transferable from stone to stone,or indeed diamond plate.

I have used natural and synthetic oilstones as well as a couple of diamond plates and no alternative has given me a better edge than a waterstone.The only downside is their propensity to wear.
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post #19 of 26 Old 12-19-2014, 06:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fareastern

I can't honestly remember.The current stone is eight or nine years old and still works well.

I don't see that you can really go wrong with a very low price water stone as you will only be out a small amount of money if the particular brand is not top-notch.The ability to get a good edge is transferable from stone to stone,or indeed diamond plate.

I have used natural and synthetic oilstones as well as a couple of diamond plates and no alternative has given me a better edge than a waterstone.The only downside is their propensity to wear.
A very good point and one I'm going to use when the next opportunity arises.

Al


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post #20 of 26 Old 12-20-2014, 02:11 AM
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Can real Arkansas stones still be bought? I have Japanese water stones but would like some Arkansas stones, if they are from Arkansas.

http://www.diychatroom.com/
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If you do what you've always done, you will get what you've always got.
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