Bar Top Slab - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 35 Old 11-09-2018, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
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I was thinking about moving it inside, I just would prefer not to do the sanding and staining as the ventilation is basement is poor. I just ordered some epoxy so I'm going to wait another week, and fill the cracks, finish the edges and sanding, and then I'll probably stain it. I think once the stain is dry I'll move it inside and clamp it to the bar frame until the weather allows me to apply polyurethane - if it continues to show new cracks when I bring it in, I'll have to go through the process again.
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post #22 of 35 Old 11-09-2018, 12:34 PM
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Keep us updated. I am planning on a 4" x 20" section for a bathroom counter top. Actually I would hope to find one slab about 8' long that is 20" at the widest. Four feet would be used for the counter top and four feet would be used for a shelf below.

I think I would use a draw shave to shave off the bark. I suspect it would flake off otherwise.

Something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Flexcut-Ergon...&tag=top505-20
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post #23 of 35 Old 11-10-2018, 03:52 PM Thread Starter
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Will do, I'll update the thread once I start filling the cracks.

I saw some video where they simply used a chisel to remove the bark and the draw knife was used to emulate the live edge. I haven't decided whether I'm going to try that or not. I am planning on removing the bark, although I have seen some threads where they have preserved it and looks good.

Thanks for all the suggestions/advice
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post #24 of 35 Old 12-03-2018, 11:07 PM Thread Starter
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Hello Again - I'm not sure whether anyone is still following this thread but if so, I do have a few more questions. As per my previous post, I did see a number of cracks in the center of the slab and I did end up filling them after allowing the slab to acclimate for a couple of weeks. Today I sanded off the epoxy and I'm preparing to use a wood conditioner and stain. I noticed some vertical lines that go against the wood grain while sanding. The slab is very smooth and there are no crevasses associated with these lines and I'm wondering whether I should continue sanding to remove them, or move forward ? In order to get the epoxy off I used a 60 Grit, then went to 80, 100, and now I'm at 150. I planned on doing a final sanding with 220 tomorrow. I'm not sure whether these lines are a concern - I'm attaching some pics. Thank you
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post #25 of 35 Old 12-04-2018, 06:39 AM
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Those appear to be saw marks and should sand off.
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post #26 of 35 Old 12-04-2018, 07:40 AM
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I will go with Ron on this one.
if you refer back to post #13, you will see the saw marks.
without being there in person, I would use the ROS with 100 grit.
then when you think all is good, revert to the "in line" sander vs
the random orbital. . . . . and go with the grain.
all that work, I would hate to see swirl marks under the finish.
and any kind of dark stain will only amplify the defects.
I don't remember what wood species you have, but it sure looks soft
from up here in the balcony.
(and if you don't have an inline sander, now is a good time to buy one.
either a 1/4 or 1/3 sheet will do most of your jobs.
the half sheet sanders are expensive, but worth the investment
if you plan to do a lot of panel projects in the future.
wishing you the best in your project.
[and yes, I have been following your progress].
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post #27 of 35 Old 12-04-2018, 11:55 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks again John You are correct, it's Cedar and it's very soft.

As you suggested I went back to the 100 Grit sandpaper and after some effort I was able to remove the saw marks. I do not have an inline sander, so I'm going to either buy one or see if I have access to one. Thank you
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post #28 of 35 Old 12-14-2018, 07:55 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry guys Ė another question if anyone has an opinion or suggestions. After reading this forum I had decided to use an epoxy finish, mainly for the durability and resistance to the inevitable spills and abuse that the bar top will endure. Now that Iím preparing to position this, Iím having second thoughts. This bar is going to be L-shaped Ė there will be one piece that goes perpendicular to the wall and another piece that will meet it and run against the wall. The slab thatís along the wall will contain a sink. I imagine the proper way to do this would be to position, level, and anchor the two pieces and pour the epoxy over the entire L-shaped bar Ö My issue is that I would prefer to epoxy the two pieces independently and then position and anchor the slabs Ė do you think this is possible ? I like the idea of being able to take the bar apart if necessary and if I pour over the entire L-shaped bar, that would be impossible.

Iím attaching a couple of pictures of the bar base where the slab will be positioned. Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks again.
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post #29 of 35 Old 12-14-2018, 08:11 PM
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Wood moves with changes in moisture. If you dry lumber slowly it will develop fewer stress cracks. Too slow and it may mold. The thicker the slabs the more likely to crack. I'm in the process of making a porch railing with turned spindles. The commercial 8/4 that I got has quite a few checks. It is my first project using cypress, chosen for its rot resistance.
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post #30 of 35 Old 12-15-2018, 04:50 PM
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Guy - turn the slabs face down and install the Joint Connector Bolts.
dry fit everything before making any permanent decisions.
I would stand the joining ends in a horizontal position and saturate the ends
with epoxy, let cure 24 hours, file and sand smooth, dry fit again with the bolts.
if you are satisfied with that, then you can pour the epoxy on each piece individually.
looking good so far !!
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post #31 of 35 Old 12-15-2018, 10:35 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you very much John - this is exactly the information I was looking for. I really appreciate your help.
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post #32 of 35 Old 01-06-2019, 01:19 AM Thread Starter
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Hello Everyone Ė Happy New Year!

Holidays set me back a bit but Iím getting closer to finishing this Ė I cut out my sink this afternoon and planning to drill the faucet hole this week. Once thatís compelete, Iím planning to secure the slab to the frame and pour an epoxy finish. I have a few questions and may start a new thread for this, but figured Iíd post here first. After reading through the forums I decided to use Environmental Technology Envirotex lite Pour on Epoxy. Iíve been reading through the instructions and have spoken to the company directly but wanted to get some other opinions. Based upon what Iíve read. my plan is to do one or two seal costs and then a single flood coat. The question I have is regarding the application of the epoxy. The techniician I spoke with recommended that I apply the seal coat via a clean cloth and rub the epoxy into any cracks and voids. She said it is not necessary to worry about covering the entire slab, the only goal is to make certain cracks and holes are filled. Does this sound correct ? I thought the seat coat should be applied evenly coat across the entire slab.

Attaching a picture to show where Iím at - this is prior to cutting out the sink. Thanks again.
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post #33 of 35 Old 01-06-2019, 09:51 AM
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wow - very impressive craftsmanship !!
congrats on pulling it off the way you wanted it to be.

yeah - start a new thread on the finishing to keep the
construction phase and finishing separate.

BELLY UP BOYS !!

.

.

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post #34 of 35 Old 01-06-2019, 09:58 AM
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Guy, I think I'm missing something....the photo appears you have a finish on it already!?!?? I haven't kept up with all the posts here regarding this build and maybe I missed a step....BUT the sheen that's on the top is like it's already sealed. Is this a part of the epoxy process they recommend or one that others recommended??? NOT all types of finishes cooperate together. I'm asking this to make sure there's not a finish conflict and heartache later.

It's looking good!!!

edit. to your question.... I'm NOT a epoxy pour-er BUT from the reading I've done , they are most likely filling the cracks and devits first to solidify them as sometimes theres a shrinkage/seepage and that would show up IF poured all at once.....just my opinion.

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post #35 of 35 Old 01-06-2019, 12:09 PM Thread Starter
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The finish thus far consists of a wood conditioner, oil based stain, and then a couple of coats of the Zinser seal coat - which is the wax free shellac. According to a lot of the threads I read on this forum, it should be compatible with an epoxy finish, so I'm hoping it will be ok. It's also been drying for a few weeks now, so by the time I pour the epoxy it will likely be close to a month or more.

I didn't take any close ups - there are plenty of inperfections but should be fine to knock back some beers. Thanks for the replies. I'll start a new thread regarding the epoxy and I'll post pics once it's complete.
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