Bar Top Slab - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 35 Old 10-29-2018, 02:27 PM Thread Starter
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Bar Top Slab

Hello - I'm a newbie DIY'er who is constructing a basement bar. I'm in the process of shopping around for my bar top - dimensions need to be around 12' x 24" x 2"+ thick. I do have some flexibility

I'm on Long Island and it's hard to find a wood mill - I found one person who was willing sell me a 12' x 24" x 2" thick piece of Atlas Cedar for $275- .... and I have no idea whether that price is good or not for a Cedar slab. Any thoughts ? I know hard woods would far exceed that.

Also - does anyone have suggestions on where I might be able to find slabs of wood in this area given the dimensions noted above? It's actually an L-shape, so it's an 8' and a 4' that I need.

Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thank you !
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post #2 of 35 Old 10-29-2018, 04:12 PM
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Hopewell Junction, NY (about 2 hours from Nassau County).

https://www.facebook.com/pg/countryw...onsnywv/about/

I have not yet bought from them, but they are in my contacts list. Apparently they will perform part or all of the prep work on the slab.

I cannot imagine picking out a live edge slab without first looking at the actual lumber.

If you decide to make the trip on a weekend, send me a note and I'll meet you somewhere. I live nearby--maybe 20 minutes from Hopewell Junction.

I've been meaning to check them out.
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post #3 of 35 Old 10-29-2018, 04:41 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for the info and I appreciate the offer - I will investigate that. That's close enough for me.

The person I spoke with has sent pictures of the slabs - they do not have a live edge, it's a dimensional board. However, it's dry unlike most everything else he has right now. The only other dry wood with a live edge is pine but the dimensions are off.
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post #4 of 35 Old 10-29-2018, 04:57 PM
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There is a place further upstate. I will look for that. I think near Albany. And another in Massachusettes. I'll look for that address too.
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post #5 of 35 Old 10-29-2018, 04:59 PM
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Try these people in Brooklyn: https://litimberworks.com/custom-log-milling/
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post #6 of 35 Old 10-29-2018, 05:31 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks again for the replies - I will definitely contact the place in Brooklyn and I did speak with someone at a place near Albany: https://capitalsawmill.com/
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post #7 of 35 Old 10-29-2018, 05:35 PM
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if you find a slab the size you want and is properly dried/cured and
has sawn edges, you can easily "finesse" a live edge look with simple
hand tools. done correctly, nobody will ever know the difference.

,

,

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --
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post #8 of 35 Old 10-30-2018, 12:32 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks john - Funny you should mention that. I was looking at this video of someone doing that this morning:

If I end up getting the dimensional Cedar slab this week, I may give that a shot.
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post #9 of 35 Old 10-30-2018, 06:57 AM
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YVW Guy - I am a sign maker by trade and I have made literally hundreds
of "rustic" wood signs that looked like a natural slab found in an old barn.
the same technique is very useful in many applications in today's world
where the public likes furniture to have that "just pulled from the swamp" look.
woodworking is fun !!! we don't have to accept the "look" of wood we buy from
the seller - we can always put our own personal twist on it to suit our needs.
you can not only address just the sides, but put in some knots and splits as well.
best of luck in your project !! please post some photos when you get it done.
[excellent find on the video, btw].

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 10-30-2018 at 07:08 AM.
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post #10 of 35 Old 10-30-2018, 08:25 AM
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Much closer is ML Condon (White Plains, NY).

I thought you wanted a live edge so I did not recommend them immediately. They will mill slabs up to 4" thick in almost any species of wood you want.

They've been in business for over 100 years. And they are very reliable, with an excellent reputation.

http://www.condonlumber.net/lumber.html
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post #11 of 35 Old 11-02-2018, 10:59 PM Thread Starter
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I appreciate the suggestions everyone - I ended up getting a slab locally. I'll post some pictures once I finish this. thanks again !
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post #12 of 35 Old 11-03-2018, 08:02 AM
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good find !!
best of luck in your project.
(the slab tables are pretty popular on the sister site: www.lumberjocks.com).

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --
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post #13 of 35 Old 11-04-2018, 06:39 PM Thread Starter
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Hello Everyone - I have a few more questions if anyone has time. I started sanding today and noticed some descent sized cracks in this slab. They don't appear to go all the way through, but they do look deep and wide enough to fill - would it be wise to use an epoxy or some other method of filling these cracks before staining ? I noticed a lot of people using the "West System" to fill cracks - not sure if that's necessary or not? Thank you
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post #14 of 35 Old 11-05-2018, 04:05 PM
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What was your source for the slab?
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post #15 of 35 Old 11-05-2018, 05:40 PM Thread Starter
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I found a guy who runs a mill in Suffolk County, I don't think they have a name, it may actually be a one man operation. I found out about him from a friend who does tree work and brings him wood.
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post #16 of 35 Old 11-07-2018, 09:41 AM
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So is this slab dried? Or green?
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post #17 of 35 Old 11-08-2018, 11:26 AM Thread Starter
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That's a good question. It's been drying outside since the spring. When I used my firewood moisture meter on the outside I get reading of between 10-12% and then in the interior of the slab I'm getting between 14-15% moisture - I know that's good enough for burning in a stove, but not sure if that's good for finishing or not ?
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post #18 of 35 Old 11-08-2018, 12:03 PM
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I was not thinking if it were dry enough to finish. I was wondering if it were going to warp are split as it dried. The only wood that I've used that was not sufficiently dry was pressure treated and that warped and split like crazy.

I have 6 short pieces that I need to have remain straight (1" x 4" x 30" pressure treated). I put spacers between them and clamped them all together as they dry out. I won't use them until the spring and if I keep them clamped they won't warp. They might split though.
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post #19 of 35 Old 11-08-2018, 01:04 PM Thread Starter
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I feel like everyone has issues with pressure treated lumber warping - I usually try to screw it down immediately or keep very heavy weight on it, but even so, It likes to bend and curve. I'm not sure what else you can do besides what you're already doing.
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post #20 of 35 Old 11-08-2018, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy White View Post
I feel like everyone has issues with pressure treated lumber warping - I usually try to screw it down immediately or keep very heavy weight on it, but even so, It likes to bend and curve. I'm not sure what else you can do besides what you're already doing.
I was not too worried about my small pieces--they are to be used as French cleats for flower boxes in the spring. I was concerned about the big expensive slab. If that starts to move around or split that will be a headache.

I wonder if moving it indoors for a while will allow it to dry out without warping.
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