Band Saw Resaw Questions - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 09-27-2020, 08:46 PM Thread Starter
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Band Saw Resaw Questions

I recently was experimenting on my new Jet band saw re-sawing a piece of Poplar and Red Oak using a 1/2" 3 TPI new blade. What I saw was a pretty rough cut and I'm wondering if this is normal given the 3 tpi blade or maybe technique? Thanks, BillF

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post #2 of 20 Old 09-27-2020, 10:06 PM
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Hi Bill, I'm new to bandsaws as well, so I only post this so you have a data point, not for some implied wisdom in the post :).

I have a new Harvey HW615, 15" saw, that came with a 3/4" 3 TPI blade. Here's a reasonably close photo of a resaw cut I made, the piece is about 3/8" thick for scale. It needed a run through the jointer because in addition to the rough cut, it cupped after I cut it. It certainly needed finish work more than just some sanding. I have a 6tpi blade on order, so I'll find out soon whether that would make a smoother cut.
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post #3 of 20 Old 09-27-2020, 11:24 PM
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I'm not an expert, but I find that I get the best re-saw results when the bottom of the board being resawn is dead square. Setup and blade tension is critical. I've found you really need to crank up the tension on the blade to re-saw. A better blade tension spring helps. Feed rate is also important; every time you stop, pressure on the blade changes causing it to move around a bit, creating ridges.

I got a 3/4" carbide re-saw blade years ago. It was expensive, but man is it nice.


Here's a link to the spring.

https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/...abandsaws.aspx
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post #4 of 20 Old 09-28-2020, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
I got a 3/4" carbide re-saw blade years ago. It was expensive, but man is it nice.
Nice in that it stays sharp and can be sharpened... does it make a nicer cut than my presumably cheap but new sharp steel blade as well?

Thanks
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post #5 of 20 Old 09-28-2020, 11:10 AM
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If you're going to run it through a planer or drumsander don't worry about it as long as the cut is straight.

Yes, the carbide blade is the way to go. Not there yet, 142" blade is a little pricey.

But Santa always brings me some toys :-D

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post #6 of 20 Old 09-28-2020, 11:57 AM
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I use standard bandsaw blades, and I get similar saw marks when I use the bandsaw. I see long, straight, parallel "scratches" in the wood. Both sides of the cut are full of them. I expect saw marks when using the bandsaw. I always assumed it

For re-sawing boards, I use the planer to start with two clean, flat parallel sides before the re-saw begins. That way, I have a reference flat side on each side of the resaw, and use the planer to clean up the bandsaw marks.

I assume that bandsaw cut marks are cause by the "set" in the blade cutting tips, where they flare out slightly in both directions. They are a necessary part of bandsaw blade design.

A random orbital sander makes quick work of bandsaw marks from resawing boards, even in hard woods like maple. Remember to give it a final cleanup pass by lightly hand-sanding with the grain.

You can even hand sand, file, scrape or plane them off. I have done that plenty of times on smaller pieces.

I wonder how carbide tipped bandsaw blades would compare to the ones I use? They certainly cost a lot more.
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post #7 of 20 Old 09-28-2020, 04:47 PM
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I recently got a 3/4" 3tps blade for my old Delta/Rockwell bandsaw, but haven't done any re-sawing yet.

A guy who does a lot of resewing told me that I should not use my fence because the blade will wander with the grain. Instead, he recommends a sort of post clamped to the fence, even with the blade so I can manually correct for blade wandering by following a line marked on the edge of the board. Does that sound right to you?
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post #8 of 20 Old 09-28-2020, 04:52 PM
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142" blade! That must be some fine bandsaw. I think my little Delta/Rockwell is only about a 54" blade or so.

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post #9 of 20 Old 09-28-2020, 05:04 PM
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I use the 1" Resaw King carbide tooth blade on my Laguna 14 SUV bandsaw and it makes a pretty smooth cut. I still need to run it through either the planer or drum sander or across the jointer if it's 6" or less in width. Most of what I resaw is wider than 6", though.

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post #10 of 20 Old 09-28-2020, 06:39 PM
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The 6 TPI won't resaw......

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Mills View Post
Hi Bill, I'm new to bandsaws as well, so I only post this so you have a data point, not for some implied wisdom in the post :).

I have a new Harvey HW615, 15" saw, that came with a 3/4" 3 TPI blade. Here's a reasonably close photo of a resaw cut I made, the piece is about 3/8" thick for scale. It needed a run through the jointer because in addition to the rough cut, it cupped after I cut it. It certainly needed finish work more than just some sanding. I have a 6tpi blade on order, so I'll find out soon whether that would make a smoother cut.

There are some 3 TPI blades that will cut fairly smooth, like my Timberwolfs. Here's a great comparison test, but the Timberwolf failed:


Another comparison with a carbide tip blade from Lenox:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 09-28-2020 at 06:47 PM.
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post #11 of 20 Old 09-28-2020, 09:24 PM
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Thanks for those links, boy does that carbide blade cut fast! I'm tempted to spring for one just for the speed. Resawing, the little I've done so far, has been a process of testing my patience, like in that Timberwolf example.
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post #12 of 20 Old 09-28-2020, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Mills View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
I got a 3/4" carbide re-saw blade years ago. It was expensive, but man is it nice.
Nice in that it stays sharp and can be sharpened... does it make a nicer cut than my presumably cheap but new sharp steel blade as well?

Thanks

Here’s a picture of a piece of red oak I just re-sawed. I just cut to a line; it might have turned out better if I had used a fence.
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post #13 of 20 Old 09-29-2020, 12:21 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the feedback guys. It kind of looks like most cuts are somewhat rough like mine was.

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post #14 of 20 Old 09-29-2020, 07:12 AM
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i switched to carbide about 4 years ago, and didn't look back. we have a resaw bs and we keep it on there. it is 1" and 3t/2in, or .67 pitch. carbide is a very smooth cut. but more importantly to us, stays sharp a loooong time. it stays on the saw until it breaks.
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post #15 of 20 Old 09-29-2020, 10:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brucet999 View Post
I recently got a 3/4" 3tps blade for my old Delta/Rockwell bandsaw, but haven't done any re-sawing yet.

A guy who does a lot of resewing told me that I should not use my fence because the blade will wander with the grain. Instead, he recommends a sort of post clamped to the fence, even with the blade so I can manually correct for blade wandering by following a line marked on the edge of the board. Does that sound right to you?
I want to address @brucet999's question: The short answer is yes and no.

Some people use the fence only like a rip fence on a table saw. They press the flat face of the board against the rip fence and push the board through the blade. That is what I do and it works well for me. The inherent assumption is that the blade doesn't drift (or the fence is adjusted for it) so that you get a reliable, straight resaw cut.

Addressing your friend's comment about the blade wandering with the grain, I have not noticed it. If it exists, it may be lost in the bandsaw saw marks that are left behind for me to plane or sand off. It may be that my experience is from resawing boards that have mostly straight even grain. I do a lot of resawing to make thinner boards for my spouse's scrollsaw projects. I just asked her, and she does not remember any resaws of very curly grain wood.

Some people do what your friend suggests, and they buy or make a curved or pointed resaw guide. It was my impression that the special resaw guides are more about compensating for blade drift rather than grain-caused blade wandering. If your blade doesn't drift, I suggest that you try resawing with the fence alone, to see what happens. I would be curious if you can see or detect wandering caused by grain.

I have a Kreg fence, and I bought the two curved resaw guides for it when I bought the fence. I tried them out, but found it was easier to control the resaw and get consistent cuts with the flat fence than the resaw guides, so they stay in the drawer for now.

There are multiple shapes for resaw guides. The Kreg resaw guides are broad curves. Some of the bandsaws at the local woodworking store have ~1 inch metal cylinder resaw guides attached to their fences. I have seen similar plastic ones, too. Some people bevel-cut two 45 degree angles on the end of a board to form a point, and clamp that to their bandsaw fence as a resaw guide.

To use those resaw guides, just attach them to the fence, and arrange it so the point or peak of the curve is just in front of the cutting edge of the blade, perhaps 1/4 inch or so. Draw the desired resaw line on the edge of the board. As you cut, keep the board against the resaw guide, but make small adjustments to the angle of the board left and right as necessary so that the cut follows the line. Smooth movement helps. Use safety protections to keep your fingers safe and out of the cut line.

If you search for YouTube videos, you will see people resawing in all different ways - some directly with the fence as I do, others with resaw guides.
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Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 09-29-2020 at 11:03 AM.
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post #16 of 20 Old 09-29-2020, 11:02 AM
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Quote:
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i switched to carbide about 4 years ago, and didn't look back. we have a resaw bs and we keep it on there. it is 1" and 3t/2in, or .67 pitch. carbide is a very smooth cut. but more importantly to us, stays sharp a loooong time. it stays on the saw until it breaks.
What brand? I've been looking at Laguna & Lennox.

Robert
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post #17 of 20 Old 09-29-2020, 11:38 AM
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A guy who does a lot of resewing told me that I should not use my fence because the blade will wander with the grain.
Yeah, I have disagree with that. Personally I get better results with a fence. Its critical that fence is adjusted for drift. I have used the post or point of contact type fences but what I found is you're essentially making micro adjustments for drift as you saw.

If the blade is sharp and tensioned well, you won't get grain wander if you keep the feed rate down.

The biggest reason I like a fence is I can keep good pressure against it without the "wobble" I got with a post type fence.

But that's me. Either way can work. I suggest you try it both ways and see what you think.

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post #18 of 20 Old 09-29-2020, 12:20 PM
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What brand? I've been looking at Laguna & Lennox.
lenox
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post #19 of 20 Old 09-29-2020, 12:35 PM
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pretty much all you need to know here .....

This is a good explanation of premium and carbide resaw blades, but I have never used either type, so I defer to the wisdom of others here:
https://www.popularwoodworking.com/p...andsaw-blades/


I have only used the Timberwolf 3 TPI in 3/4" wide, and it worked reasonably well in Spalted Maple, a fairly hard wood and about 8" thick or so:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/r...bandsaw-58708/


The thicker the wood, the heavier the wood and the more support you need to manage it the in and out feed ends. My "support" table was obviously temporary and and formed the basis of a sled which I pushed hard against the right edge of my saw table to register a strip/cleat screwed on underneath. A simple concept that worked for me.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 09-29-2020 at 12:37 PM.
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post #20 of 20 Old 10-06-2020, 05:04 PM
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Wandering can be a real PIA.

It boils down to the "beam strength" of the blade profile, front to back. The "beam strength" is a result of the thickness of the coil stock from which the blade is made, how deep the blade is from front to back (cutting edge to trailing edge), and degree of tension. These are all variables that require retuning after changing blades. Higher beam strength yields a straighter, truer cuts because the blade is effectively stiffer and less prone to twisting and thereby following a deviant course.

In broad terms, a thicker, deeper blade is much stiffer than a thinner and shallower blade, but this can be somewhat mitigated by increased tensioning. Generally, the carbide resaw blades are thick, deep beasts that keep their shape even as the guides spread further and further apart. Thinner blades are much flimsier and easily twist as the guides spread apart.

Feed rate also impacts wandering/grain following -- too fast and the grain, especially obliquely crossing grain, can lead that blade off course. I use a lot of Doug Fir, and it has very hard growth rings interspersed with rather soft pith rings, and this can easily lead my blade off course if the blade deviates a tiny bit whilst in a pith ring; I find uniformly hard wood seems to lend a better course for the blade. However, feeding too slowly is not good either because the friction heats the blade, which causes it to expand, which not only causes it to become thicker and bind more and more, but it also causes the blade to become longer and that effectively reduces the blade tension.
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