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wiretwister 10-13-2012 09:16 PM

Band saw
 
Might be a stupid question but how thick of a piece of wood can you cut with a Ohio forge 10 inch band saw? Is the 10 inch referring to the throat depth?

Dave Paine 10-13-2012 09:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wiretwister (Post 387331)
Might be a stupid question but how thick of a piece of wood can you cut with a Ohio forge 10 inch band saw? Is the 10 inch referring to the throat depth?

This is not a stupid question. I understand the confusion.

The normal convention for bandsaw "size" is the maximum width of the wood which can be cut.

So normally a 10in bandsaw can cut a maximum of 10in wide piece.

The maximum height which can be cut will be part of the detailed specification of the saw.

FrankC 10-13-2012 09:47 PM

Two wheel bandsaws are sized by the diameter of the wheels, the throat capacity is usually about 1/2" less, so that saw would have 10" diameter wheels and 9 1/2" throat capacity.

Chaincarver Steve 10-13-2012 10:13 PM

I have learned from experience that the X-inches rating is totally without rhyme or reason and tells you absolutely nothing meaningful about the saw except that the manufacturer pulled the number randomly out of their arse. Seriously, I've owned more than one band saw "called" the same size, having different throat and resaw capacities AND different sized wheels. The number is bogus marketing BS.

cuerodoc 10-13-2012 11:18 PM

Not trying to be trite; but the best way-no matter the brand --is to measure the available depth. My first bandsaw had 12 in wheels but can only go to 6 in depth.

woodnthings 10-13-2012 11:30 PM

The stated size of a bandsaw is the dimension from the blade to the support column. The capacity of the machine depends on the maximum height the upper blade guide can be raised above the table. That's also the resaw capacity.
Whether a machine will be able to cut that dimension in hardwood depends on the blade, it's condition and the HP of the motor. A 10" or 9" machine will have about a 1/3HP motor. That will be adequate for hobby work, cutting 1" and slightly thicker material, but will not be adequate for resawing 4"- 6" thick hardwood in my experience. I have a nice 10" Craftsman with the 1/3 HP motor, which I bought for my son who was 8 years old to learn on and to use. I have since taken it over as a utility machine to cut various materials like plexiglas, foam rubber and smaller wood pieces. I use the larger bandsaws I have which are set up for resawing thicker materials up to 8". These are 14" and 18" saws and have up to 3 HP motors. Having more than one bandsaw saves the time of changing over the blades for specific operations, a big factor in my shop. You must "adjust" the side guides and rear guide when changing blade thicknesses and widths, a PITA depending.

BZawat 10-14-2012 12:20 AM

516 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by woodnthings
The stated size of a bandsaw is the dimension from the blade to the support column. The capacity of the machine depends on the maximum height the upper blade guide can be raised above the table. That's also the resaw capacity.
Whether a machine will be able to cut that dimension in hardwood depends on the blade, it's condition and the HP of the motor. A 10" or 9" machine will have about a 1/3HP motor. That will be adequate for hobby work, cutting 1" and slightly thicker material, but will not be adequate for resawing 4"- 6" thick hardwood in my experience. I have a nice 10" Craftsman with the 1/3 HP motor, which I bought for my son who was 8 years old to learn on and to use. I have since taken it over as a utility machine to cut various materials like plexiglas, foam rubber and smaller wood pieces. I use the larger bandsaws I have which are set up for resawing thicker materials up to 8". These are 14" and 18" saws and have up to 3 HP motors. Having more than one bandsaw saves the time of changing over the blades for specific operations, a big factor in my shop. You must change side guides and rear guide when changing blade thicknesses and widths, a PITA depending.

Always wondered what the 9", 10", etc was referring to.

FrankC 10-14-2012 12:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BZawat (Post 387404)
Always wondered what the 9", 10", etc was referring to.

The 9", 10" etc refers to the diameter of the wheels, not the throat size.

Check specs of 14" Delta bandsaw, throats size is listed as 13 5/8":
http://www.deltamachinery.com/produc...category_id=47

wiretwister 10-14-2012 12:59 AM

I'm wanting a band saw to use with my 12 inch lathe. Something to cut up 8 inch and smaller logs. Guess I need a 2 to 3 hp band saw?

BernieL 10-14-2012 01:01 AM

Woodworking questions always lead to different answers and when methods are the topic, different answers can all be correct. Now I'm no expert in these matters but if I were to chose an answer for this particular non method question, I would side with "Woodnthings". A 10 inch saw will have 10 inches from blade to column. A 12 inch saw will have 12 inches from blade to column etc. etc.

FrankC 10-14-2012 01:14 AM

What more can I say other than that a manufacturer lists a bandsaw as a 14" and states it has a 13 5/8" capacity, check a few other manufactures as well such as Grizzly, they say the same thing.

I am only trying to prevent someone needing 14" throat capacity buying what is listed as a 14" saw and finding it only cuts 13 5/8".

johnnie52 10-14-2012 01:37 AM

I have a Grizzly 14" band saw that would actually make a 14" cut from blade to frame and had a resaw cap of 6". I added the 6" riser to be able to resaw 8" material and because of the design of the riser, it now only cuts 13.5" from blade to frame. The guys are right when they say it has to do with the diameter of the wheels. The guys are also right when they say it is the distance from blade to frame. Finally the guys are also right when they say it is mostly just a number that the manufacturer pulls out of their arse.

IMO, y7our best bet is to measure the distance from the inside of the blade to the frame and use that as its measurement.

FrankC 10-14-2012 01:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cuerodoc (Post 387385)
Not trying to be trite; but the best way-no matter the brand --is to measure the available depth. My first bandsaw had 12 in wheels but can only go to 6 in depth.

The depth that a bandsaw will cut has no bearing on the size of the wheels and is determined by the manufacturer.

jharris2 10-14-2012 02:41 AM

Yeah, my BS is labeled as a 15".

Blade to column is 14 1/2", wheel diams are 14 3/4" with a max cutting depth of 8 1/2".

I always wondered too.

Thanks for splainin'

Jeff

"I have never let my schooling interfere with my education"

Mark Twain

cabinetman 10-14-2012 07:09 AM

It's been my belief that the sizing of a band saw used by the manufacturer...like 10", 12", 14". 18", etc., is generally the throat depth from the blade to the column. It may not be exact, but close.

Blade changing may call for changing the guide bushings. That means just changing their position...not removal and installation of a different type. They are usually wrench adjustable and not a problem. What makes the smaller less powerful band saws most efficient is using an appropriate blade for the project. IOW, type of blade, TPI, and tooth design.





.

Chaincarver Steve 10-14-2012 02:42 PM

See!? I tried to tell you guys the number is bogus BS. We can't even get a straight answer from a bunch of bandsaw owners. I've owned 3 different bandsaws and I tell you from experience that the advertised size is meaningless crap that is, apparently, largely arbitrary and indicative of nothing. As there seems to be no standard - nor truth in advertising - if the advertised number ever coincides with either the throat size, wheel size OR resaw capacity it is only by pure chance. :blink:

ryan50hrl 10-15-2012 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FrankC

The depth that a bandsaw will cut has no bearing on the size of the wheels and is determined by the manufacturer.

It sure does.....try cutting something 15 inches on a blade that goes over 10 inch wheels.....

woodnthings 10-15-2012 03:19 PM

Yes and no...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ryan50hrl (Post 387993)
It sure does.....try cutting something 15 inches on a blade that goes over 10 inch wheels.....

Falberg Sawz has come up with a unique bandsaw that will cut intricate shapes in very thick material. Videos at the bottom:

http://www.falbergsawz.com/elf/elf.html

FrankC 10-15-2012 03:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ryan50hrl (Post 387993)
It sure does.....try cutting something 15 inches on a blade that goes over 10 inch wheels.....

There are two restrictions on a band saw, throat depth, distance between blade and frame and the height of cut which is the distance between table and blade guide.

The height of cut is determined by how far apart the wheels are, not how large they are.

If it was possible to extend the frame of a 10" saw so the wheels are farther apart you could cut something 15 " high.

Midlandbob 10-15-2012 06:40 PM

To Wiretwister:
I think the inch thing has been hashed out but your question of HP is a good one. With a sharp blade and a very patient woodworker you could cut the 8 inch block for your lathe. If the wood is damp, a blade with a lot of set is needed but minimum 1 HP .
I can do it on my General 14 inch. I also have a 3 HP bandsaw that really will resaw or easily cut the 8 inch deep cut. It will cut to 12 inches if the blade is really sharp and the pressure is just right. The blade can slowly deflect if all is not set up rightly.
Really big blocks are easily rounded for the lathe with a chain saw and the block sitting on a slight pin on the end of a piece of log( i drive in a nail and cut off the head). If its balanced, just cutting off the corners off of an octagon is enough.
Bob


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