Attaching 2" stock to 3" pole/leg - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By TomCT2
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 12:09 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 76
View Bill4807's Photo Album My Photos
Attaching 2" stock to 3" pole/leg

Hi,

Does anyone have recommendations about attaching a 2" vertical piece to a 3" vertical leg.

So the long lengths are attached, roughly 48"' L pole to a 36" L - 2" thick piece.
I have done this before with glue and pocket holes and it was fine since it was a small bedside stand.
But now i am trying to make a dresser, its pine but i would like to join it a different way.
I thought maybe i would try dowels?
Or could i route out male tennon along the connecting piece and a female pocket in the leg to fit them.

Does that sound crazy or is this typical?

Thanks,
Bill4807 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 05:18 AM
Senior Member
 
ducbsa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Virginia
Posts: 452
View ducbsa's Photo Album My Photos
Can't visualize what you are describing; maybe a sketch?
ducbsa is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 06:10 AM
Senior Member
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dickinson, Tx.
Posts: 4,207
View Tony B's Photo Album My Photos
Same here

Tony B Retired woodworker, among other things.


"Strive for excellence and settle for completion" Tony B
Tony B is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 09:35 AM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 3,219
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
the words 48 inch, 36 inch, pole and dresser used together is very confusing.
if you have done this before, a photo of that project would help.
and ~ why are there two different thicknesses of wood "pole" being joined together.
much more info needed, please. and photos, sketches or drawings will help too.

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #5 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 10:16 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,709
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Confusing ...... yep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill4807 View Post
Hi,

Does anyone have recommendations about attaching a 2" vertical piece to a 3" vertical leg.

So the long lengths are attached, roughly 48"' L pole to a 36" L - 2" thick piece.
I have done this before with glue and pocket holes and it was fine since it was a small bedside stand.
But now i am trying to make a dresser, its pine but i would like to join it a different way.
I thought maybe i would try dowels?
Or could i route out male tennon along the connecting piece and a female pocket in the leg to fit them.

Does that sound crazy or is this typical?

Thanks,

Poles and legs? We typically don't use the term pole in furniture building. Pole barns have poles for sure .....

Attaching two verticals together, a 2" thick and a 3" thick?

The lengths are not important at this point.

Are the pieces to be joined side by side OR at right angles, like at the corner?

You will need to clarify the question.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 11:15 AM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 3,219
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
Assembly of Different Woods for One Project

I join 4x4" stock to a 3x2" stock of another kind to a 2x2" stock
of yet another kind of wood to turn on a lathe for mallets.
I use whatever size and quantity of dowel that is appropriate for the project.
two-part liquid construction grade epoxy is my adhesive of choice.
of course this method will work for any number of projects that is to be turned on a lathe.

Attaching 2&quot; stock to 3&quot; pole/leg-mallet-assembly.jpg

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.

Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 09-19-2020 at 11:32 AM. Reason: added photo
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #7 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 08:51 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 76
View Bill4807's Photo Album My Photos
Yes, sorry about the description i didn't know how to describe it, or the correct terminology.

For me to describe it easier how would you join a 2x4 to another 2x4. But joining the first 2x4 on the 3.5" face to the 1.5" face of the second 2x4.
Bill4807 is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 09:00 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,709
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Glue and screws ......

There is no problem with gluing long grain to long grain and holding them together with some screws. You just need to have both flat surfaces mate together and a few clamps won't hurt to keep them tight will you put the screws in. Drill a pilot hole through the first one slightly smaller than the solid portion of the screw. DO NOT use drywall screws as they are brittle and will snap off if subject to sideways forces OR if your drill driver exceeds the torque limit it will snap the heads right off.

Torx head screws for decks will be best and the heads won't strip out like Phillips head screws..... BTDT.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 09:03 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 76
View Bill4807's Photo Album My Photos
This photo attached for example.
So it would be like the side of this stand attaching to one of the legs. See how the pieces not the same width because of the trim piece outlining it.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	sketch-1600563644466_1600563697719.jpg
Views:	28
Size:	137.5 KB
ID:	395643  

Bill4807 is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 09:07 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,709
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Side by side ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill4807 View Post
This photo attached for example.
So it would be like the side of this stand attaching to one of the legs. See how the pieces not the same width because of the trim piece outlining it.

Again, I don't understand what you are wanting to do. If you want to attach the two different width pieces at RIGHT ANGLES like in the photo then that's where you need a mortise and tenon joint.



If the pieces are attached side by side or parallel to one another, follow my advice in the previous post.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 09:08 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 76
View Bill4807's Photo Album My Photos
the way i did this one was with glue and pocket screws if you zoom in.

Wondering if there is another more sturdy way.
This is actually pretty strong, but still would like to know my options.
Bill4807 is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 09:13 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,709
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
OK< it the panels you are attaching!

Those panels need to move across their width, so if you rigidly attach them with pocket screws they may split. Typically the panels are set into a dado, but not glued in. They "float" and move independently of the main frame. I'm not saying what you did will fail necessarily, but it could happen.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #13 of 16 Old 09-19-2020, 10:13 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 76
View Bill4807's Photo Album My Photos
Ok, a dado, i know what that is.
Maybe ill try that this time.
But a question, isn't a dado a shallow mortise and tennon?
Its a male side and a female side/pocket, right?
Or is there another definition of a mortise and tennon.
Bill4807 is offline  
post #14 of 16 Old 09-20-2020, 10:27 AM
Senior Member
 
TomCT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,530
View TomCT2's Photo Album My Photos
for mortise & tenon typically the tenon is not as thick, and not as wide, as the workpiece. i.e. is is cut on all four sides, to fit the mortise pocket.

the dado is one long groove cut to width for the joined pc.
a dado does not have to continuous from one end to the other - to make those I use a router, and clean up the ends with a chisel.
in cases, you can round the ends of the joined piece - that depends on how "hidden" the corrners are...

here's a simple table I made for our daughter - it's a 'custom' size to fit a specific area; standard tables didn't fit....
the upright legs - a dado in the front / rear, the side legs fit into the dado.
the "skirt" between the uprights is a blind half-lap joint. it was a bit thin on the back side, so I glued in a small "doubler" for reinforcement.
the whole thing is glued - not a single nail or screw anywhere.
Attaching 2&quot; stock to 3&quot; pole/leg-dsc_4008s.jpg
cynrich likes this.
TomCT2 is online now  
post #15 of 16 Old 09-20-2020, 12:51 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,709
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
They are similar but .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill4807 View Post
Ok, a dado, i know what that is.
Maybe ill try that this time.
But a question, isn't a dado a shallow mortise and tennon?
Its a male side and a female side/pocket, right?
Or is there another definition of a mortise and tennon.

Yes, a dado is a groove rather than a pocket and yes a dado will accept a "tenon" but here's the difference. A mortise has 4 sides a dado has only two. The sides on a mortise can only be chiseled out, a dado is continuous. The principle is about the same as the both restrict the movement of the inserted piece.


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 09-20-2020, 02:12 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 76
View Bill4807's Photo Album My Photos
Perfect Got it.

Thanks everyone now i understand the differences.

TomCT2 nice table! This is what i run into more often as well that items do not fit where i want them, so i need to make them.

Woodnthings: thanks for all the information once again, very, very helpful.

Johnsmith_infl: making a mallet would be a cool project
Bill4807 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome