Any of you also grease monkeys? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 28Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 31 Old 08-23-2019, 06:47 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Ron_J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 417
View Ron_J's Photo Album My Photos
Any of you also grease monkeys?

So I get my hands in a lot of different projects. Sometimes I'm breathing sawdust, and sometimes I'm playing in grease or welding, or grinding. Unfortunately I have to do it all in the same area for the time being. Last night, while I was waiting for the glue to dry on a cabinet I'm making, I replaced the clutch on the grandkids dune buggy. I ended up getting my hands covered in oil and grease and subsequently everything else I touched. I really had to make a conscious effort not to touch anything that I would be using to finish the cabinet. Even a separate box of rags is hard to keep straight.

Anyone else have this problem?
Ron_J is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 31 Old 08-23-2019, 07:06 AM
Ole Woodworker
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 4,245
View BigJim's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron_J View Post
So I get my hands in a lot of different projects. Sometimes I'm breathing sawdust, and sometimes I'm playing in grease or welding, or grinding. Unfortunately I have to do it all in the same area for the time being. Last night, while I was waiting for the glue to dry on a cabinet I'm making, I replaced the clutch on the grandkids dune buggy. I ended up getting my hands covered in oil and grease and subsequently everything else I touched. I really had to make a conscious effort not to touch anything that I would be using to finish the cabinet. Even a separate box of rags is hard to keep straight.

Anyone else have this problem?
Right now, my wood/mechanic shop is scattered with car parts. I am trying to get our newly bought 2008 Sentra SE-R Spec V running right. The dealer sold me a car with no catalytic converters and a problem I still haven't solved. The car will bog or loose some power when it get warm.

I replaced our grandsons' engine last year and I also did a ton of work on our Pathfinder. I don't do mechanic work by choice.
Catpower likes this.

http://www.diychatroom.com/
The Other
BigJim

If you do what you've always done, you will get what you've always got.
BigJim is offline  
post #3 of 31 Old 08-23-2019, 06:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Catpower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Frognot Texas
Posts: 2,199
View Catpower's Photo Album My Photos
Over the years I ended up building way too many shops, my first one when we moved here in 1995 was a 30x50x10 that I figured would be plenty big. If got filled up with antique tractors so I added a 30x50 lean to on the back. Then I decided I wanted a dedicated wood shop so I built a 30x50x10 shop, since I was in the HVAC/R bidness I put a 5 ton split system in it, nice and comfy in the hot Texas sun


Then we got a new house finished about a 1/2 mile in the back side of our land, we have 45 acres, so I built a 40x60x12 shop close to the house


Then I started building HVAC/R equipment so I built a 60x120x12 fab shop, all the shops are heated and insulated, the wood shop and the shop by the house are also air conditioned. My wife commandeered the shop close to the house, I still keep my front end loader tractor along with her 4720 JD lawn mower, everybody should have a 66 hp lawnmower LOL Nah she just wanted an air conditioned cab LOL


Now the point of all my rambling, back when things were going good, and money was really rolling in I joined the gun of the month and sometimes week club, I got up to 48 guns and my wife said no more until I get a gun case built. I bought some very highly figured walnut and built a case that would hold 60 long guns and a bunch of pistols. It was ready to finish when my moronic step son pulled his van into the wood shop because it had A/C, took the power steering pump out of his van and laid it on the gun case and spilled fluid all over it. I have never wanted to shoot a person as bad as I did when I saw that, and I spent 2 1/2 years in Nam LOL


But I have acquired about 8 more guns so, I really need to get building, the power steering fluid case is trash no way to get it off the wood, it soaked in deep. Guess I could have used power steering fluid for the finish LOL
BigJim, woodnthings and Old_Tom like this.

There is no app for experience
Catpower is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 31 Old 08-23-2019, 06:48 PM
Senior Member
 
Kerrys's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Sedro Woolley, WA
Posts: 739
View Kerrys's Photo Album My Photos
Used to build motorcycles. Now not to much wrenching now. Rebuilt the lawn tractor engine last year. Couldnít see tossing a perfectly good riding lawn mower because it started burning oil. About a hundred bucks in parts, an afternoon to tear it down and rebuild the motor I should get quite a few more years out of it. Iíll still change the oil in our vehicles and will do minor repairs but with todayís engines even a tuneup requires a specialized computer and tools. I have a young man that grew up with our kids who has built a respected, successful auto repair business that gets most of our vehicles if it is something beyond my abilities now.
Kerrys is online now  
post #5 of 31 Old 08-23-2019, 07:36 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,870
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
A lawn mower engine is pretty basic....

The new engines in trucks and cars are an electronic maze of relays, computerized contollers and circuit boards. My son was a certified heavy mechanic and drivability diagnostician in dealership and a small auto repair shop. He was so good at reading wiring circuit diagrams and fixing the "unfixable", he is now a service tech for dealer mechanics who get stumped and need help.... Dial 1-800-HELPME
He comes home with some horror stories about "grease monkeys" who work at the dealers who have no clue what they are doing. The new key fobs are an example of car specific programing where a "new" key fob can't communicate to the original computer that came with the car and no amount of reprograming will fix it. The dealer guys end up ordering new computers and new fobs costing the company thousands of dollars, but they must be programmed at the factory so they will talk to each other.

I have an old 1980 Chevy with a distributor and a Holley carb, which is dirt simple compared to today's fuel injection, start up and shut down at traffic lights, cylinder drop out for fuel economy and so forth... When they break down, WHO will be able to fix them?
BigJim and Catpower like this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #6 of 31 Old 08-23-2019, 08:31 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,870
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Make lemonade from the lemons ...

I would have done exactly this:
But I have acquired about 8 more guns so, I really need to get building, the power steering fluid case is trash no way to get it off the wood, it soaked in deep. Guess I could have used power steering fluid for the finish LOL


Sort of a red oil stain. It wouldn't smell that good, but it might look OK? Fathers seem to never stop covering for the mistakes of their children. Common sense is not an inherited trait apparently. My son did as well as I could have expected, but we don't see eye to eye on some things that aren't too important in the "big picture of Life". I've "disowned" him a few times, but only in my mind.
BigJim likes this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #7 of 31 Old 08-23-2019, 09:57 PM
Senior Member
 
Kerrys's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Sedro Woolley, WA
Posts: 739
View Kerrys's Photo Album My Photos
@woodnthings a lawnmower engine is fairly basic but have had easier times rebuilding Harley engines than I did the lawnmower engine.
Kerrys is online now  
post #8 of 31 Old 08-24-2019, 09:26 AM
Ole Woodworker
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 4,245
View BigJim's Photo Album My Photos
Last night the clutch went out on our grandson's Toyota 4X4, so did my blame back. Looks like I might just be supervising on this one. Just my dern luck.
Catpower likes this.

http://www.diychatroom.com/
The Other
BigJim

If you do what you've always done, you will get what you've always got.
BigJim is offline  
post #9 of 31 Old 08-24-2019, 12:03 PM
Senior Member
 
Catpower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Frognot Texas
Posts: 2,199
View Catpower's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
I would have done exactly this:
But I have acquired about 8 more guns so, I really need to get building, the power steering fluid case is trash no way to get it off the wood, it soaked in deep. Guess I could have used power steering fluid for the finish LOL


Sort of a red oil stain. It wouldn't smell that good, but it might look OK? Fathers seem to never stop covering for the mistakes of their children. Common sense is not an inherited trait apparently. My son did as well as I could have expected, but we don't see eye to eye on some things that aren't too important in the "big picture of Life". I've "disowned" him a few times, but only in my mind.

He is my step son. I raised him since he was 7, he is 40 now, he even wanted to change his last name to mine when he was younger so we went through that process, sounds easy but it was rather high priced. I always refereed to him as my son, but he has gotten so stupid lately I let everyone know he is a step son LOL


A example, he got disability from the Army for PTSD so the Army couldn't fulfill his contract, so they gave him a choice, either take $1000 monthly and get re-evaluated every year or take $100,000 severance pay. I told him he might want to take the severance pay because they might say he is cured in a year or two, so he did.


When he got the money it was discussing to watch two people just blow $100,000


Then he got SSDI, he had to take them to court to get it, but he did, the back pay he got from his original filing date amounted to about $50,000. WE had hoped he had learned from his first check not to blow this one but he did.


They went through $150,000 and have absolutely nothing to show for it. Some of the things they bought had value to them but they sold them dirt cheap. When he had the $100,000 he wanted to buy a tractor from me, it was worth about $15,000 but I sold it for $10,000, just to be nice. He traded that tractor straight up for a 1993 Ford conversion van


Things like this are why he is a step son LOL
BigJim likes this.

There is no app for experience
Catpower is offline  
post #10 of 31 Old 08-25-2019, 11:19 AM
Senior Member
 
firehawkmph's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Near Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 4,990
View firehawkmph's Photo Album My Photos
My shop is divide into three areas. 1/4 woodworking shop, 1/4 motorcycle shop, 1/2 automotive shop. Total shop is a little over 2600 sq. Ft. My son is an auto mechanic and does some side work here. Also builds high performance Subarus. Always something going on in here. I do my own maintence on my vehicles. Actually makes it fun. Surround sound stereo and separate furnaces in two of the three shop areas.
Mike Hawkins
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_8504.JPG
Views:	25
Size:	132.6 KB
ID:	378167  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_8479.JPG
Views:	22
Size:	80.9 KB
ID:	378169  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3356.jpg
Views:	23
Size:	474.9 KB
ID:	378171  

BigJim, Catpower and Kerrys like this.
firehawkmph is offline  
post #11 of 31 Old 08-25-2019, 12:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 1,985
View Tool Agnostic's Photo Album My Photos
We were all scratching our heads, trying to figure out how to get a heavy, 400 pound SawStop PCS175 cabinet table saw home from the Rockler store. The Rockler store had a manual fork lift that could load the large box containing the saw into the back of my small SUV. It was a tight fit. There were a few 1/16ths to spare on the top and sides, but it was definitely going to fit.

Nobody at the store could think of a way to get it unloaded from the back of the SUV to the ground once I got it home. I brought home the accessories (fence, rails, blade guard, outfeed table, etc.) in a separate trip, so we had a few days to think about it. Ideas ping-ponged around, like: build a ramp, enlist strong neighbors, rent a flat U-Haul trailer, assemble it in the store and roll it 10 miles home on its mobile base, deliver it by drone, beam-me-up-Star-Trek, eeek!!! ... At that point, exasperated, I asked my spouse for suggestions. (Yeah, why didn't I ask sooner? Some guys never learn, I guess.)

Spouse is a genius, pure and simple. She heard the problem and instantly recommended our motorcycle lift, which has a large, flat, steel bed. When you attach it to an air compressor, the motorcycle lift can raise a 1000 pound motorcycle to waist height with ease.

Thanks to Spouse's brilliant idea, I was able to unload and assemble an entire SawStop cabinet table saw without assistance. I backed the SUV near the garage and matched the height of the motorcycle lift to the tailgate of the SUV. It took a few tugs to slide the saw onto the motorcycle lift. I left the saw on the lift and unboxed it partly there, taking out as many parts as I could, such as the heavy cast iron wings. I used the lift to lower the 400 pound table saw. I used foam from the packaging to protect the saw as I rolled it onto a carpet dolly, and from there, down the motorcycle lift ramp to the garage floor to continue the assembly process.

I don't see a "wood" shop and a "mechanic" shop. I see a garage with tools to be used for fixing or making things. ... and a beautiful, wonderful spouse. :-)
BigJim and Catpower like this.
Tool Agnostic is online now  
post #12 of 31 Old 08-25-2019, 01:35 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,870
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
That reminds me of the time ....

I bought a 10" Craftsman Hybrid that was on clearance, a floor model that was fully assembled. It had a Biesemeyer fence and rails. It was quite heavy, around 300 lbs or so. The Sears employees managed to get it on a pallet mover and out to the pickup area. There were 5 of us standing there trying to figure out how to get it into the back of my Sierra short box pick up, when I took charge and suggested we tip it on its side and lean it against the tail gate. Some cardboard in the bed made it easy to slide up and into the truck with the table facing down. This was a safer carrying position than having the heavy mass of the tables upright causing it to be tippy. It didn't even need any tie down straps as it was a close fit between the wheel wells. To get it out we just reversed the process and slid it down to the ground on a cardboard for protection. We tipped it onto a dolly and away we went.
BigJim and Tool Agnostic like this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-25-2019 at 04:24 PM.
woodnthings is offline  
post #13 of 31 Old 08-25-2019, 07:47 PM
Senior Member
 
Kerrys's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Sedro Woolley, WA
Posts: 739
View Kerrys's Photo Album My Photos
I did a similar deal when I purchased my Rigid 4512 on sale at the local home depot. A couple guys at the store helped me load it. At home I was on my own. I back my truck up to the garage door and dropped my tailgate down all the way. I then slid the box to the back of the truck and standing outside the bed slid the box down the tailgate until on the floor of the shop. Figured out which side was the top of the saw and rolled the box until the top was on the floor. Cut away the sides and bottom of the box exposing the saw. Proceeded to assemble and attach the rolling base then hook the saw up to a come along that was attached to a 4x4 spanning a couple trusses. I used some rope to attach to the saw from two points to the come along and slowly raised and rolled the saw to an upright position where I finished the assembly.
BigJim and Tool Agnostic like this.
Kerrys is online now  
post #14 of 31 Old 08-26-2019, 01:30 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 2,887
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
i try to minimize using the grinder in the woodshop. would be quite easy for a spark to fly across the floor and smolder in a pile of wood chips overnight...

hmmmph what that siren noise outside?
TimPa is offline  
post #15 of 31 Old 08-26-2019, 01:36 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Ron_J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 417
View Ron_J's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
i try to minimize using the grinder in the woodshop. would be quite easy for a spark to fly across the floor and smolder in a pile of wood chips overnight...

hmmmph what that siren noise outside?
I always worry about this when welding.
Ron_J is offline  
post #16 of 31 Old 08-26-2019, 02:01 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 663
View gj13us's Photo Album My Photos
My dad was the consummate DIY guy, including when it came to cars. My experience as a grease monkey is mostly of me holding a flashlight for waaay to long while my dad skinned his knuckles trying to figure out what he's doing.

So no---I've always been willing to pay someone to do the grease monkeying. (except for oil changes, which I do myself unless I mangle the filter to the point that it requires a tow truck and a professional mechanic to remove it).
gj13us is offline  
post #17 of 31 Old 08-26-2019, 02:31 PM
Ole Woodworker
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 4,245
View BigJim's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by gj13us View Post
My dad was the consummate DIY guy, including when it came to cars. My experience as a grease monkey is mostly of me holding a flashlight for waaay to long while my dad skinned his knuckles trying to figure out what he's doing.

So no---I've always been willing to pay someone to do the grease monkeying. (except for oil changes, which I do myself unless I mangle the filter to the point that it requires a tow truck and a professional mechanic to remove it).
Next time you mangle the oil filter and can't get it off, drive a long screwdriver through it then you have something to hold on to twist it off.

http://www.diychatroom.com/
The Other
BigJim

If you do what you've always done, you will get what you've always got.
BigJim is offline  
post #18 of 31 Old 08-26-2019, 03:05 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,870
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Who overtightened it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
Next time you mangle the oil filter and can't get it off, drive a long screwdriver through it then you have something to hold on to twist it off.

My rule is "snug" by hand, then add 1/2 turn, by hand, but always oil the gasket first. You just want to compress the gasket, not like threading a pipe or a nut.
BigJim likes this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #19 of 31 Old 08-27-2019, 07:02 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Ron_J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 417
View Ron_J's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
Next time you mangle the oil filter and can't get it off, drive a long screwdriver through it then you have something to hold on to twist it off.
That used to be the preferred way to remove the stubborn filter. Now, if they do have a canister filter, it's located in such a manner that you can barely fit a hand in there, let alone a screwdriver to turn it.

My truck has the canister filter, but the other 2 cars have the paper cartridge filter.
Ron_J is offline  
post #20 of 31 Old 08-27-2019, 07:16 AM
Ole Woodworker
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 4,245
View BigJim's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron_J View Post
That used to be the preferred way to remove the stubborn filter. Now, if they do have a canister filter, it's located in such a manner that you can barely fit a hand in there, let alone a screwdriver to turn it.

My truck has the canister filter, but the other 2 cars have the paper cartridge filter.
Man am I behind times, I am not aware that there are any other type of oil filters. Got a picture of one, how do they work? I do agree that they make cars now days so close quartered it is unreal. Our 2008 Sentra SE-R Spec V engine is so close to the side wall that I have to drive a wooden wedge between the engine and side wall to get the belt off and on. The bottom pulley is so close the belt turned side ways will not get past. Can't be more than 1/8 inch clearance there.

http://www.diychatroom.com/
The Other
BigJim

If you do what you've always done, you will get what you've always got.
BigJim is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome