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post #1 of 12 Old 01-21-2018, 03:36 AM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
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I suspect this woodworker has done this before by the speed at which he works:

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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #2 of 12 Old 01-21-2018, 05:18 AM
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I suspect this woodworker has done this before by the speed at which he works:
Seems like that's what he does all day everyday. He had the technique down for sure.
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post #3 of 12 Old 01-21-2018, 05:42 AM
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Does he put on shoes when the OSHA inspector shows up?
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post #4 of 12 Old 01-21-2018, 07:55 AM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
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Lol

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Does he put on shoes when the OSHA inspector shows up?
I think by the lack of shoes and his dexterity using his feet, he may be oriental, possibly Japanese...? Dark hair cut short also a clue. His female helper was wearing boots. He uses a pretty fair share of power tools and the blade on that bandsaw look to be about 2" wide, so not traditional Japanese style of woodworking. Who cares?

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post #5 of 12 Old 01-21-2018, 09:52 AM
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I don't know if I would have posted that video here with so many novice woodworkers. Just too many safety rules being broken. Then with the film being shown in FF it looks like what safety measures he was using was just cast to the wind. Reminds me of a monkey though with two sets of hands.
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post #6 of 12 Old 01-21-2018, 01:16 PM
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I’m guessing they’re Vietnamese. Working in a woodshop starting at about 8 years old. Safety seems of little concern. Some type of homemade glue concoction. Pieces are made by just “eyeballing” the dimensions and alignments. Lathe tools look like a combination of chisels, screwdrivers and a putty knife. No need for a vice or Workmate when you can hold things with your knees and your feet. And obviously cleaning the shop just cost time and money. Wood most likely not dry.
A very interesting video.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #7 of 12 Old 01-21-2018, 01:22 PM
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Impressive work. What's really impressive is that he still has 10 fingers. (and for that matter, 10 toes)
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post #8 of 12 Old 01-22-2018, 09:00 PM
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Westerner's don't have the dexterity to work in the fashion that many Easterner's do...

I don't mean that to sound badly, just stating the apparent reality of their body dexterity to what we see here in North America, or in most of Europe for that matter. This, in turn, effects their approach and concept of safety as well, which in my experience is also rooted in their general cultural base philosophies. Look at the way many of them drive...It's plan dangerous on roads there...Not judging them, it's just the way it is...

Safety too is cultural. I tend to take guards off tools too. I was taught that my "Safety" lives between my ears...I often heard..."See this...its sharp...don't touch it." That was a real basic lesson in safety and about as fare as anyone went with it. They all had there fingers and toes. Hewing in Japan is often done standing on the log with bare feet...again "perceived risk" compared to "actual risk." Just because it looks "unsafe" doesn't necessarily mean it is. From my perspective on this, the one thing that I have heard discussed yet, is this is a tropical oily hardwood of some type, and the dust from these are usually not something a rag over your face is going to protect lungs from damage in the long term...but who knows...they may be resistant to such things from generations of being around it...
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post #9 of 12 Old 01-23-2018, 04:35 PM
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Not to go off on too much of a soap box, but....

I've been doing woodworking for 40 or so years. I had always felt confident using my tools and went for a long time with no mishaps. Then one day, I found myself re-learning to play the guitar because I only had 9-2/3 fingers. I didn't try to screw up, it just happened and it happened FAST! It was a clear indicator of how unforgiving power tools can be and how you kinda never know what can go wrong until it does.
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post #10 of 12 Old 01-23-2018, 06:09 PM Thread Starter
where's my table saw?
 
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I play on them, I don't play them ....

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Not to go off on too much of a soap box, but....

I've been doing woodworking for 40 or so years. I had always felt confident using my tools and went for a long time with no mishaps. Then one day, I found myself re-learning to play the guitar because I only had 9-2/3 fingers. I didn't try to screw up, it just happened and it happened FAST! It was a clear indicator of how unforgiving power tools can be and how you kinda never know what can go wrong until it does.
Yes, things do happen fast, but I'll wager you could describe exactly how this happened, and what you would do differently. This is Murphy's law in action. If something can go wrong ..... think of what you could do to prevent an injury... should it go wrong. Most often the hands or fingers are in direct line with a spinning cutter or blade, never a good idea. There's often a gut feeling you have before something goes wrong and those feelings are worth reconfiguring your operation to insure nothing bad happens.
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post #11 of 12 Old 01-23-2018, 08:33 PM
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....... There's often a gut feeling you have before something goes wrong and those feelings are worth reconfiguring your operation to insure nothing bad happens.
Amen!
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post #12 of 12 Old 01-24-2018, 12:53 PM
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Well, I'm a novice woodworker, and what intrigued me is that, safety aside, I didn't see no Lee Nielsen, Rob Cosman, Veritas, Powermatic, Jet, Delta, DEFINITELY no Sawstop, Woodpeckers, Incra, Biessemeyer, etc. etc.... I mean this guy basically built that with an old bandsaw, old router, nails and some homemade glue! That's impressive, I don't care who you are....... Oh, and something resembling a lathe.... LOL.....
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