Always hold your wood - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 04-22-2009, 09:08 PM Thread Starter
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Always hold your wood

I was making a climb cut in a piece of plywood on my router table today, well that piece of wood just didn't want to be there. It was flung from my hands and right through the wall. I can't believe the force this board had when it hit the wall. I had headphones on, dust collector running, and obviously the router running too. With all of that going on, I still heard this wood break through the drywall. Its a good thing there is insulation in the wall, or it would have come through the other side and into the house.
Mental note- Your wood will do what it wants when it wants
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post #2 of 15 Old 04-22-2009, 10:09 PM
HALL OF FAMER
 
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Walls are fixable. Be glad it wasn't your fingers.
Ken
(Oh yeah, nice to see your table saw splitter right where it belongs....on a shelf? )

There is a very fine line between a "hobby" and a "mental illness"
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post #3 of 15 Old 04-23-2009, 06:00 AM
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What is a climb cut?

George
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post #4 of 15 Old 04-23-2009, 07:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
What is a climb cut?

George
Its when it climbs out of your hand and into the wall (I haven't heard that term either)

I was cutting a small piece of wood less than 3" by 2" on my table saw about two months ago (thought I could just shave it a hair trying to save time) anyway it rode up on the top of the blade and shot out like a gun right into my thumb and took half of the nail with it. Moral of the story: trim your nails.......... just kidding, There are no short cuts when it comes to safety


Edit: climb cut --- A router cut made in opposite direction from normal. That is, a cut made such that the cut is in the same direction as the pull from the rotating motion of the blade. This is NOT a good idea for full cuts, because control is poor, but it is invaluable as a way of avoiding edge chipout by making a series of very short, shallow climb cuts (until you have made a short full cut) just long enough to assure that the bit won't cause chipout as it exits from the edge when making the full cut in the normal direction (where the blade's rotating motion pushes against the wood as the cut is made). If the edge is still square, a backing board is preferable to a climb cut, especially if you are not accustomed to making climb cuts, but if the edge has already been routed, a backing board may not be any use.

info from phinds woodworking glossary

Last edited by AGC-Aaron; 04-23-2009 at 08:52 AM. Reason: new info
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post #5 of 15 Old 04-23-2009, 08:06 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Climb Cut

Is when you feed the workpiece in the same direction as the cutter is rotating. As on a router table the cutter rotates CCW the feed should be right to left. In this case our OP was feeding left to right....I assume since he used the climb cut term.
The reason it's not a preferred proceedure although practiced by many, myself included, is that drywall takes alot of time to fill sand and paint ... among others.....sometimes, but not aways results in kickback as above, Incremental cuts are the best way to deal with this when a climb cut is unavoidable.
Generally speaking, and there are exceptions to every rule, you want to trap the workpiece against the fence with the cutter rotation. The first chips that fly off want to be forced into the fence. A climb cut would send send the intitial chips in the same direction as the workpiece is being fed, that's Ok, if the cut isn't deep. Otherwise the cutter bites in takes a big chuck and hooks onto the work and that's when it leaves your hands! Imagine feeding a tablesaw from the rear The first teeth to touch the work are going to try to lift it off the table. While normally feeding the work from the front, the first teeth are pressing the work into the table. Simple, right? bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-23-2009 at 01:57 PM.
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post #6 of 15 Old 04-23-2009, 08:06 AM
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I believe a climb cut is when you cut with the rotation of the cutter instead of against it.

Glad you didn't get hurt. Might make you gun shy for a little while, though. It would me.

Rob
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post #7 of 15 Old 04-23-2009, 08:19 AM
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What is the advantage of doing a "climb" cut, other then putting a new hole in the wall for an electrical socket box?
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post #8 of 15 Old 04-23-2009, 08:43 AM
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I believe it's to avoid tearout, the router books I've gotten hold of say to start with a short "climb cut on the opposite end then go back and run through the proper direction to keep the blade from tearing the wood out as the piece exits the blade.
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post #9 of 15 Old 04-23-2009, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
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Everyone has the climb cut right. I was cutting a groove in the plywood and was using this technique to reduce the amount of chip out that would happen. After the wood shot out, i decided to just deal with the chip out and ran it through the normal way.
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post #10 of 15 Old 04-24-2009, 08:21 AM
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When I make a climb cut, I don't use the router table. The router has handles making it easier to hold onto and the wood can be clamped down.

Gotta clamp to a heavy bench, though, or you may just shoot it through the wall.

Rob
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post #11 of 15 Old 04-24-2009, 11:31 AM
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WOW!

Red

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post #12 of 15 Old 04-26-2009, 12:48 AM
 
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I use climb cutting technique with my routers from time to time but have never done it on the router table, just with router itself with both hand firmly on the router and the work piece securely clamped down.
Bobby
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post #13 of 15 Old 04-26-2009, 02:10 AM Thread Starter
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Clamped down on a table is the way its going to be from now on.
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post #14 of 15 Old 05-04-2009, 11:32 PM
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climbing cut

So, is there any way todo this safely? Featherboard, several passes?
Can't beat it for reducing chatter, but without the table...too much..
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post #15 of 15 Old 05-05-2009, 01:10 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
So, is there any way todo this safely? Featherboard, several passes?
Can't beat it for reducing chatter, but without the table...too much..
Since my mishap, I have read about people online doing this by having a featherboard in place, and making the initial cut very shallow and then do the cut to full depth. I haven't tried that yet, but it makes a lot of sense.
Nick
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