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post #1 of 19 Old 08-19-2014, 10:52 PM Thread Starter
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???

Maybe I need to get out of the shop more. Because for the life of me I don't know what these are for.

???-image-4274972461.jpg

Why are they on all my, not so long ago tool purchases. Government tracking devise?

Al


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post #2 of 19 Old 08-19-2014, 11:06 PM
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I know some of the older computer equipment had those little 'cans' molded into their power cords, but I can't remember what they were for.
In your case, though, I think maybe a fuseable link that disengages the power if the cord pulls too much juice causing the cord to heat up. Just a guess.
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post #3 of 19 Old 08-19-2014, 11:08 PM
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A google search makes me think it's a ferrite choke. It's used to block some types of electromagnetic interference.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrite_core
Long story short, electrical cables have the potential to send or receive radio wave transmissions. The Ferrite choke stops this from happening. At least that's what I got out of the article.
-Matt

Last edited by haugerm; 08-19-2014 at 11:27 PM.
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post #4 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 12:39 AM
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They are security devices for theft control.
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post #5 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 12:47 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djg
I know some of the older computer equipment had those little 'cans' molded into their power cords, but I can't remember what they were for.
In your case, though, I think maybe a fuseable link that disengages the power if the cord pulls too much juice causing the cord to heat up. Just a guess.
It freely slides up and down the cord.

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post #6 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 12:49 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haugerm
A google search makes me think it's a ferrite choke. It's used to block some types of electromagnetic interference.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrite_core
Long story short, electrical cables have the potential to send or receive radio wave transmissions. The Ferrite choke stops this from happening. At least that's what I got out of the article.
-Matt
I think your right.

Al


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post #7 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 12:51 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv
They are security devices for theft control.
So someone opens the box and sticks it on each cord? I got one through the mail.

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post #8 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 12:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer View Post
So someone opens the box and sticks it on each cord? I got one through the mail.

Al
They are put on at the factory. My buddy owned a local tool shop where they had all tools in boxes on display and people would take the tools out of the box to get them past the detector at the door since the security device was typically glued to the inside of box.
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post #9 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 01:04 AM
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post #10 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 01:09 AM
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For those that don't like to click links....

B&G Plastics Announces the Emtag (TM)
Improved Anti-shoplifting Protection for ALL Electrical Products.
In response to retailer demand for better product protection of high-theft electrical products, B&G Plastics, the leading source for EAS-Integrated tagging devices, announces the release of the Emtagtm series, EAS-Integrated tagging solutions.
The Emtagtm is specifically designed to affix to integrated power cords of electrical products. Constructed of two components made from a high impact polymer, one component houses the Acousto-magnetic EAS device, which is applied by B&G during production. The components simply snap together, permanently locking onto the power cord.
Testing by an independent laboratory has proven that the Emtag is 200-300% stronger than any competitive product on the market. A stronger EAS tagging solution is harder to defeat. The Emtagtm 's significant strength provides dramatically superior product protection from shoplifting.
The simple application process and low cost make the Emtagtm extremely attractive to manufacturers for EAS-source tagging and to retailers for protecting floor samples.
"By attaching directly to the cord, the Emtagtm protects the product... not the packaging", said Jack Mohrle, National Sales Manger, EAS Products for B&G. "The improved product protection permits more aggressive merchandising, which has been proven to dramatically increase sales and profits for both the retailer and supplier", he said.
The Emtagtm has been designed to subtly blend with the power cord, masking the anti-shoplifting protection that it provides. The device can be customized to a client's color and imprint requirements, and is available in a range of sizes to accommodate multiple cord dimensions.
The Emtagtm is currently being used to protect an assortment of products in the Home Center and General Merchandise retail categories.
B&G Plastics is the leading worldwide resource for plastic accessory hangers and promotional merchandising devices. In addition to producing a wide range of EAS integrated tagging products for anti-shoplifting programs, B&G Plastics, Inc. distributes EAS label media worldwide.
For more information contact: Jack Mohrle -- B&G Plastics, at Tel: 973.824.9220 -- Email: [email protected] , or Andrew Au -- B&G Plastics Far East Ltd, at Tel: 852.2389.1864 -- Email: [email protected].

2008 B&G International Inc.
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post #11 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 09:25 AM
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the general purpose is a ferrous ring used to shield interference to the machine. Common for sensitive electronics, computers, tvs, ect. I cant imagine that a power tool would be particularly effected by such things, and as such I have never seen a device on one.

In this case, it is entirely possible that it is an antitheft device cleverly concealed as a ferrous ring.
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post #12 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 09:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haugerm View Post
A google search makes me think it's a ferrite choke. It's used to block some types of electromagnetic interference.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrite_core
Long story short, electrical cables have the potential to send or receive radio wave transmissions. The Ferrite choke stops this from happening. At least that's what I got out of the article.
-Matt
Yes, that's what the ones I mentioned on computers were for. I remember.

I guess my idea was all wet.
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post #13 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 12:51 PM
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The emi suppression chokes are to prevent the "noise" from spreading via the house wiring. It's not to protect the machine with the choke, it's to protect everything else.
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post #14 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 04:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBa View Post
The emi suppression chokes are to prevent the "noise" from spreading via the house wiring. It's not to protect the machine with the choke, it's to protect everything else.
Correct. They filter high frequency noise generated by devices that have switching power supplies inside. But a ferrite bead would not be movable on the cord. This is obviously an anti theft device, as pointed out by Marv.

Dave in CT, USA
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post #15 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 06:43 PM Thread Starter
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I doubt it's an anti theft devise. How would the store disarm it?

Al


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post #16 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 07:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer View Post
I doubt it's an anti theft devise. How would the store disarm it?

Al
The same way they disarm any other security device which is to pass it over that little pad on every check stand at every store that has them. A quick Google search finds a thread with pics of one opened up to show exactly what's inside and interestingly enough it appears to be that same little white plastic security device you find glued to the inside of every box with something of value that may be shoplifted...

http://www.routerforums.com/general-...564-emtag.html
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post #17 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 08:26 PM
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Definitely an rf device. Stupid concept if it's for anti-theft, there was one on the SCMS I bought some time ago. Saw came in a factory sealed box, so no, they didn't run it across any disarming pad.

I'm going to guess RFID for inventory control at the manufacturer, although Emtag bills it as anti-theft. Here's the inside of the one from the saw:
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Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
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post #18 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 09:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maylar View Post
Correct. They filter high frequency noise generated by devices that have switching power supplies inside. But a ferrite bead would not be movable on the cord. This is obviously an anti theft device, as pointed out by Marv.
regardless of what the thing in the picture is, ferrite beads don't need to be attached, they just have to have the wire pass through them. There are lots of snap-on suppressors. I've build projects that use them exactly that way.
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post #19 of 19 Old 08-20-2014, 09:21 PM
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It's just an anti-theft device. Put the thing in the vice, squeeze it the obvious way, and break it off.

Then glue it to your tin-foil hat, and use it to communicate with the Martians! It's magicalicious!!
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