45 deg corner trouble - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 30 Old 06-25-2017, 08:33 PM Thread Starter
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That is entirely possible. I've been told that before.
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post #22 of 30 Old 06-25-2017, 09:35 PM
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One of the quickest ways to screw up a 45 joint is to have opposite sides of unequal length. The cuts can be a perfect 45, but if the opposite sides are of unequal length, the joint won't close up.
GeorgeC and woodnthings like this.

Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
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post #23 of 30 Old 06-26-2017, 07:55 AM
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I don't know that it'll fix your particular problem, but if your miter gauge is out of whack even just a tiny bit go getcha one of these dohickies.. https://miterset.com
You can reset from 45 to 90 (and anything in between) really quick and very accurate. It's the single best purchase I've made this past year.
My miter gauge is every bit as old as my saw (about 35 years old I guess) and before I bought the Miterset I played hell trying to readjust any angle. Now it's just a matter of seconds to get near perfect angles every time. It's about $65, but I'd easily pay double the price for it. Heck, I'd even starve the entire village just to buy a new Miterset..
Ok, maybe not quite that far..just half the village..
You might also want to look into a digital angle finder from Wixley.. in fact I have an extra sitting around I'd sell..never been used.. When I bought mine I'd forgotten that I'd already placed the order and paid twice for the same item and just never got around to returning the second one.

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?

Last edited by allpurpose; 06-26-2017 at 08:01 AM.
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post #24 of 30 Old 06-26-2017, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchymist View Post
One of the quickest ways to screw up a 45 joint is to have opposite sides of unequal length. The cuts can be a perfect 45, but if the opposite sides are of unequal length, the joint won't close up.
Good point that is often overlooked.

George
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post #25 of 30 Old 06-26-2017, 02:00 PM
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Couple of Thoughts:

I have the Forrest blade and it's great. I'm not saying it's an absolute cure to your problem, but it is a great blade.

I find it very difficult to cut accurate miters on the table saw. As the wood engages the blade, the blade seems to want to push the wood away. I find that this happens even more when I'm trying to "sneak up" on a cut. Toolman50's suggestion for the sandpaper to keep the wood still would probably help a lot. A miter gauge with a clamp would also help.

I also find that there's enough sloppiness in the fit of the miter slot that the angle can change as you're cutting. This drives me nuts and I'm going to look into the miter gauges that others have recommended.

Lastly, I've heard rave reviews about the accuracy of this device.


http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/mitertrimmer.aspx
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post #26 of 30 Old 06-26-2017, 03:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
Couple of Thoughts:

I have the Forrest blade and it's great. I'm not saying it's an absolute cure to your problem, but it is a great blade.

I find it very difficult to cut accurate miters on the table saw. As the wood engages the blade, the blade seems to want to push the wood away. I find that this happens even more when I'm trying to "sneak up" on a cut. Toolman50's suggestion for the sandpaper to keep the wood still would probably help a lot. A miter gauge with a clamp would also help.

I also find that there's enough sloppiness in the fit of the miter slot that the angle can change as you're cutting. This drives me nuts and I'm going to look into the miter gauges that others have recommended.

Lastly, I've heard rave reviews about the accuracy of this device.


http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/mitertrimmer.aspx
That is a good tool if you are in the picture framing(or other small wood) business. Picture framers generally use a machine that cuts vs saws.

George
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post #27 of 30 Old 06-26-2017, 07:39 PM Thread Starter
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Yeah, I have 2 of those mitre trimmers. I've also had limit success with them. If you're cutting real soft wood, or small cross sections, they're great. Hardwood, big pieces not so much. Funny thing about their construction; the angle in one direction is held by spring tension, nothing more. It takes only moderate pressure to make it go wonky.

Would anyone like to buy one?

Yeah, it's constantly in my mind that the opposite sides have to be that same length. I take great pains to try and make that happen.
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post #28 of 30 Old 06-28-2017, 09:58 PM
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I have one of these, https://www.infinitytools.com/saw-bl...e-24t-125-kerf and it rips hardwood fabulously.

I actually bought their 3 pack and love all 3 blades.
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post #29 of 30 Old 06-28-2017, 10:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay C. White Cloud View Post
If I may...disregard this post if it doesn't fit your perspective or sensibilities, I take no offense...but perhaps it is your approach?

We have become..."machinist of wood"...not woodworkers over the last century since the Industrial Revolution...myself included all to often...ha,ha.

Even for those "magical creatures" I often work with that can do just amazing things with all there shop based and hand power tools...they still spend rather a great deal of time "dialing in" those tools to get many very simple tasks done....especially...angled joints!!

Additionally, these tools are typically much more expensive to "feed and care for" when compared to hand tools, in general.

I suggest a concert of both hand and power tools perhaps may make your dialing in of angled joints less troublesome...???

In my experience, I still find it much faster to do my "dialing in" up to my scribe or layout line with a scary sharp hand tool, when compared to most (not all) power tools. This is especially true with angled joints.

My parting suggestion (and/or trick) to many joint challenges of snugness...including angle joints...is learning the "ins and outs" of different coping, coving, undercutting, and related diminishing of the interstitial areas within the joint....

These traditional tricks/methods facilitate only the visible portion of a joint to be accented when the different members come together, and thus renders and extremely tight joint union that stays that way even with seasonal changes...This is part of the reason I do not care for (nor recommend) most machine base joint formations. They form (by their very nature) only "set angles" and do not allow or facilitate undercutting that is necessary for this very useful technique to make "tight joint unions," beyond the draw boring and/or clamping of a joint. With this simple trick, joints become very tight and stay that way permanently and through seasonal changes...

Hope this perhaps helps or at least provides something to think about...?

I agree that sometimes I find the manual method to just be faster and more accurate. But in the case, I would enjoy hearing more about your specifics techniques when it comes to angled cuts manually.
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post #30 of 30 Old 07-02-2017, 09:47 PM
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Originally Posted by plasma800 View Post
I agree that sometimes I find the manual method to just be faster and more accurate. But in the case, I would enjoy hearing more about your specifics techniques when it comes to angled cuts manually.
In the case of this post thread...I probably would employ either chiesl and/or shooting board planning modalities to sneak up on my layout line after cutting the board with either a powered Mafell Rail Saw or a traditional Japanese Cross Cut or Bow Saw...Then spline, toggle of hidden dovetail the corners...perhaps...??
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