2x4 ripped lengthwise - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-20-2018, 09:45 PM Thread Starter
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2x4 ripped lengthwise

Anybody have carpenter bees? I resawed this board that had been on my house. It had only one or two entry holes.
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-20-2018, 10:05 PM
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YES and they don't care what they chew on!!!! This is a Eastern Red Cedar beam out from under a 1800 log cabin...I was surprised when I squared up for a replacement in a 1860's house. I'd always heard they won't bother cedar....WRONG....we also worked on a mid 1900's barn with ERC log rafters....the bees were wearing them out.

Does anyone now with facts, when introduced or IF they've always been here in USA??? I just noticed more damage in the last 20 years.

Hey Jay White Cloud..... any history as to always been a problem and a natural cure????

Sorry not the best pics.

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Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-20-2018, 10:22 PM
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I built a large two level deck at our old home using TYP . After twenty years, I tore it down and replaced it with concrete. During the tear down, I found quite a bit of their tunnels in the timbers under the decking. It gave me another reason for replacing the deck as I had grown quite tired of the maitenance it required.

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post #4 of 11 Old 01-20-2018, 10:34 PM
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Steve Neul...!!!...That sucks man!!!...so sorry...



Hi Tim (et al) thanks for asking...

Point of validation...

I am trying really hard to improve my varied writing styles as I have been trying to pull a few books together over the last decade. I think, sometimes (99.9% sure) I come accross as too blunt or outlandishly opinionated...Sorry to everyone for sounding that way when and/or if I do to anyone...

Reason (not excuses mind you) for this is a very eclectic and esoteric career history...which ties into this current post. I was (among other things back in the 80's and 90's) a state supervisor for Wildlife and Pest Control for the state of Connecticut. Carpenter Bees (Xylocopa genus) of the Hymenoptera (ants, bees, wasps, hornets, etc) are the scourge of woodworkers!!!!

Native species...yes.

Found in some form just about anywhere there are trees...YIKES!!!!...and UH-OH!!!

This is because (like Carpenter Ant species) they are...wood nesters...NOT wood eaters. As such they will chew on just about anything they can and actully prefer softer species of wood pressure treated or not very often on bad years like the past few (bio rhythms, climate shifting and all that jazz...as it is now.)

As you have all learned they will go after Cypress (what we call cedars) and Junipers, and just about anything else these little Sh_ _ A_ _es can destroy wood from the inside out. One or a few more "ingress points" and they will chamber out year after year different nests that will empty a section of wood except for the skin of it...

They don't like hard woods (for the most part) tend to stay completely away from Locust, Catalpa wood, and if traditional methods of treatment are to be applied...it seems...Tulip Poplar (actually a magnolia) actually works best in keeping these little beasts away...bad years perhaps being the acceptation. Trapping is still the best method of control and swatting them dead whenever you can with a Bad-mitten Racket...

Would a post thread of there own be of interest Steve? or Tim? I could pull one together if of interest to our readers?

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post #5 of 11 Old 01-20-2018, 10:44 PM
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Thanks for the reply Jay.....interest....YES....BUT it's your time involved... a link would be as handy....done the BAD MITTEN thing....fun for a while BUT....they end up winning in time!!!!!

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
........www.TSMFarms.com.......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.
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post #6 of 11 Old 01-20-2018, 10:51 PM Thread Starter
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I wonder how you get rid of the bees? At one time or another I've sprayed insecticide in the entry holes and they keep coming back.

In this case it's no big deal the board was bad. I just try to recycle wood whenever I can and this board was weathered on the surface but solid, or seemed so. I was really stunned when I cut the board and turned it over saw all the damage that was done, I had no idea. I think in the future I need to try harder to get rid of the bees.
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-20-2018, 10:58 PM
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When I was growing up my grandfather's garage had hundreds making holes into the rafters. They are pests but they make the most perfect round holes, better than a round drill. He never did find a way to get rid of them. He left them alone and they did not bother any of his wood projects.
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post #8 of 11 Old 01-21-2018, 11:32 AM
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One pest can control another. White faced hornets are at the top of the food chain and they eat other bugs and wasps. Not sure about carpenter bees, but the white face is particularly fond of yellow jackets. They keep to themselves unless threatened, so not so much of a threat to people.

I had a rather large nest fall from a tree in my yard last fall during hurricane Jose. Before that there were no yellow jackets in the area, now there is. I hope the hornets come back.

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post #9 of 11 Old 01-29-2018, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maylar View Post
They keep to themselves unless threatened, so not so much of a threat to people.
.
Really? I have found them to be as aggressive as yellow jackets. In fact, I was about 150' from a nest, on the opposite side of a house back in the yard when one came flying by, didn't even land on me, but simply stung me on the fly as it went past. I steer way clear of those guys.
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post #10 of 11 Old 01-30-2018, 10:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmwood_1 View Post
Really? I have found them to be as aggressive as yellow jackets. In fact, I was about 150' from a nest, on the opposite side of a house back in the yard when one came flying by, didn't even land on me, but simply stung me on the fly as it went past. I steer way clear of those guys.
The nest in my yard was probably 30 ft up in a tree, right by my driveway. I never even saw one until the day the nest fell. Maybe they were too busy eating yellow jackets to be bothered by me.

Dave in CT, USA
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post #11 of 11 Old 01-30-2018, 12:01 PM
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We got rid of the ones around here when we first got here by giving our son and his buddy badminton rackets and got them to see who could kill the most of them, it worked pretty good as we have very few here, but I think what might have worked the best was spraying all the exposed wood in my shops with Lorsban

Carpenter bees are generally pretty docile, but their bumble bee cousins arn't, they do look somewhat alike, but carpenter bees are generally darker

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