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post #1 of 11 Old 03-30-2011, 10:59 PM Thread Starter
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Question what to charge

I am having to get into pricing out residential homes and I haven't a clue on how too do it. Is it better to charge 2.2 per linear square foot or by the piece. I am going to try to trim for myself and If anyone could help me with this or point me in the right direction I would greatly appreciate it and thanks for looking at my thread. Ok here are the things I need to have priced, installing interior doors, window sills and aprons, case and base, meerer frames, crown, base, fire place mantle and installing the cabinets

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post #2 of 11 Old 03-30-2011, 11:27 PM
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You really should explain what you are going to be doing in these homes. I'm from central OK, so I could probably give you an idea.
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post #3 of 11 Old 03-31-2011, 03:29 AM
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Have a look at the Kreg video on Trim Carpentry.
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post #4 of 11 Old 03-31-2011, 04:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hinkster View Post
I am having to get into pricing out residential homes and I haven't a clue on how too do it. Is it better to charge 2.2 per linear square foot or by the piece. I am going to try to trim for myself and If anyone could help me with this or point me in the right direction I would greatly appreciate it and thanks for looking at my thread
There are a few ways to figure out the cost. You'll have to be within a range of estimates that other bidders give, or have a good justification for why you are higher. Likewise, some projects you may not get because your price may seem too low in relation to other bidders, which may be taken as your work could be inferior...and you certainly don't want that.

I like getting jobs when my price is on the high side. I believe a full explanation of what is involved will impress a client as to your experience and honesty. Lets face it, you've got to sound believable.

If you were using 2.2 as a constant multiplier, that seems to me to be on the low side. I figure costs based on my actual materials costs. Those can be from my making all the trim from solid stock, or just buying it. I figure amounts with a plus factor of at least 25% or more. You don't want to run out in the middle of a wall.

Finished wood moulding I carry out finished. So, the cost of that would be figured from the start. I also charge for what gets carried out, which includes the overage.

Other factors affecting costs are any difficulties, like high work, or a lot of angle sections. Some jobs require two men, so figure the cost of a helper if it applies. So, think about what tools and equipment you may need.

Along with your costs on the material, a factor of 3x may not always cover your time. I doubt you can get T&M, and if you did, you could lose money even if you stood around whistling for a while.

You have to balance out how to figure. No matter what your materials costs are figure that initially. If you make it and finish it, or just buy it. Take the lineal footage of the installation and divide it out to see what the $/LN Ft are. Do the multiplication of the constant factor. If it's 3, see if the amount for the job will cover you for the materials and whatever time you will put in. The time is the other factor as it can take longer than you think.

If the total seems like it's profitable, use that factor. Or, you could itemize like a line item billing, for labor, materials, overhead, and profit. Those figures could come right from your constant factoring amount (but broken down). Some clients are a bit leery about a linear foot price, so explaining how you derived the cost may make them comfortable in writing you a check.








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post #5 of 11 Old 03-31-2011, 06:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hinkster View Post
I am having to get into pricing out residential homes and I haven't a clue on how too do it. Is it better to charge 2.2 per linear square foot or by the piece. I am going to try to trim for myself and If anyone could help me with this or point me in the right direction I would greatly appreciate it and thanks for looking at my thread
Are you bidding on new homes as a sub-contractor or remodeling for a home owner. The first thing to do is research what the builders in the area are paying.

Talk to some Interior trim contractors in your area to find out current prices.

I know in North Carolina it's a cut-throat pricing war since the mortgage collapse and for the most part what work you can find the builders are getting bids at half or less than they where two years ago.

If you can find out how the local builders are taking bids and if they supply material or if it's a turnkey type deal where you have to supply the material. How much trim goes in the house, type of window trim, how much closet trim/shelves-shoe racks-etc. How extensive is the trim on the stairway, crown moulding, chair rail, wainscoting, the list goes on.

Different cities, different builders, different trim.

Maybe someone on the forum is local to your area and can better answer your question.

After I've said all of this I'm thinking I shouldn't have said nothing

You will always learn by doing, so I've learned.
Only trying to help ~Leon~
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post #6 of 11 Old 03-31-2011, 08:21 AM
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Much has changed in my area in the last five years. There are still people willing to pay good money for top notch work, but there are now more guys willing to work for much less. There is much truth to not coming in too low as not to appear desperate or inferior, but establishing a good reputation is something you cannot put a price on. I used to hire a helper when needed mostly to keep the project moving so that I could start the next one on schedule and maintain a profit. Now I work mostly solo. Yes all the money stays in my pocket, but I also have to still finish the job in a timely fashion. I learned trim carpentry from a guy who is a one man army. Working efficiently is critical, staying in shape also helps, as much of working solo involves you to do all of the bull work, and the skilled work. The trade off for me is that I can still walk away feeling like I made good money.

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post #7 of 11 Old 03-31-2011, 08:30 AM Thread Starter
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installing interior doors, window sills and aprons, crown on ceiling, base, closet, linnon, and pantry shelves, fireplace mantle and installing cabinets in the jack and Jill, master bath, and kitchen. as well as meeror frames for bathrooms. we will also install the hardware in closets and threw out the house. I am sure there are extras but it seems there always are. Thanks
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post #8 of 11 Old 03-31-2011, 08:38 AM Thread Starter
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I will use the info wisely and I do appreciate all the replies from all of you.
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post #9 of 11 Old 03-31-2011, 10:00 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for givin me a heads up on what to expect.
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post #10 of 11 Old 04-16-2011, 12:45 AM
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post #11 of 11 Old 04-16-2011, 07:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scribbles View Post
$3.50
We might get that in OK if we were building all the cabinets and only if they were really REALLY nice ones. If you get $1.50 for the back out and setting the cabinets you're doing great around here.
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