trimming window jambs that stick in past the wall - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 06-25-2012, 11:45 PM Thread Starter
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trimming window jambs that stick in past the wall

Has anybody ever used a flush cut power handsaw to trim the window jambs back flush with the wall in order to make everything work a little easier? Any other advice would be appreciated. These are new windows in an old farmhouse with lathe and plaster walls. Some of the window jambs on this job are flush but a lot of them are sticking in anywhere from an 1/8th to a 1/4 inch.
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post #2 of 15 Old 06-26-2012, 05:55 AM
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A hand held saw won't make it in the corners. A power planer from the wall surface might be better.....don't worry about the blade getting nicked up, it will. A router with a bottom bearing from the inside would work, but you still have the corner issue.
A plunge router on a larger base from the wall side would work.
I suppose a spoke shave and a block plane if all else fails..... bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 15 Old 06-26-2012, 06:00 AM
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If these are new windows shouldn't the reveals have been cut to size before the windows were installed.

As for the issue at hand, the windows may be easy to remove trim and re-install.

If not I would go with the previous comment for smaller windows - use a power plane. For larger windows I would use a saw for the bulk of it and finish off the corners with a power plane.

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post #4 of 15 Old 06-26-2012, 06:43 AM
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I prefer to install trim, nail it to the window frame and cut fillers so that you have a solid fit on the trim. Yes it takes more time and yes it's a PITA but it looks much better once completed
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post #5 of 15 Old 06-26-2012, 06:50 AM
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I am confused.

Does "sticking in" really mean sticking out?. Do the jambs stand proud of the wall or do they end within the window opening?

Either you cut them off and then use casement to give a finished look or build out and still use casement.

George
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post #6 of 15 Old 06-26-2012, 06:57 AM
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"sticking in"...into the room

Quote:
Originally Posted by drwilson85 View Post
Has anybody ever used a flush cut power handsaw to trim the window jambs back flush with the wall in order to make everything work a little easier? Any other advice would be appreciated. These are new windows in an old farmhouse with lathe and plaster walls. Some of the window jambs on this job are flush but a lot of them are sticking in anywhere from an 1/8th to a 1/4 inch.
That's the way I understand it....sticking into the room. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #7 of 15 Old 06-26-2012, 07:09 AM
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I would first determine if there is a reason for the protrusion. The plane of the wall may not be flat. Ordinarily a small protrusion doesn't affect the application of casing. I don't think I have found a condition where every window has been installed in a completely flat wall.

No matter how it gets trimmed back other than removing it and re-installing it, may leave a stepped or uneven edge. That would preclude getting a nice reveal when the casing is applied.





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post #8 of 15 Old 06-26-2012, 12:06 PM
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I would pack the window casing out and not mess with trimming the jambs down.
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post #9 of 15 Old 06-26-2012, 01:56 PM
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Rabbet the casing to fit over the jambs?

John

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post #10 of 15 Old 06-26-2012, 11:21 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the replies. I havent really started on them yet and Im not looking forward to. The new windows were installed by the manufactures installers. Then they supplied the casing which is 7/8 x 2-3/4 but its not milled out on the back side so its not very forgiving at all. And, of course being lathe and plaster walls they arent flat at all. But I guess we will see how it turns out though.
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post #11 of 15 Old 06-27-2012, 12:29 AM
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Beltsander

I find that a Beltsander with 100 grit works well if you have to flush a jamb to the wall. You can use the wall for reference and the sander marks that the wall receives are usually covered by the trim as long as your careful. Also the platen of the sander helps to keep the jamb edge flat enough that it doesn't look too out of line. That being said, how far out are we talking here, past 3/16 of an inch and I would recommend shimming and using backer rod.
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post #12 of 15 Old 07-01-2012, 07:51 AM
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Before cutting or sanding make sure that the jamb material is a solid wood and not veneer.
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post #13 of 15 Old 07-01-2012, 10:01 AM
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You can use a low angle block plane to shave down the protruding jambs. No dust, noise or power. Easy to control, fairly quick.
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post #14 of 15 Old 07-09-2012, 12:19 AM
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x 2 for rabbetting the casing.
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post #15 of 15 Old 07-11-2012, 02:22 PM
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you didn't mention two things, paint or stain grade, and, is the protrusion around entire jamb. it is not commonly all the way around, just varying with wall variations and window installation variations, usually not over 1/8". if paint grade, i apply the pre-assembled window trim much like a picture frame and attach to the jamb tight. then push back to the wall where it can, then caulk the remaining gap and paint. stools and aprons a little different.
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