Trimming Stair Skirt - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 46 Old 08-27-2013, 07:02 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 22
View leungw's Photo Album My Photos
Trimming Stair Skirt

Hello. Could someone advise on how to do a proper transition around the end of this skirt board?

I put a small piece of baseboard there just to show the height. I plan to rip the top profile from the baseboard to make a base cap so it can run along on top of the skirt. The end of the skirt board is flush with the wall at the corner.

Do I turn the base cap to the narrow wall and then run it down, then turn 90 degree to meet the baseboard?

Thank you.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by leungw; 08-27-2013 at 07:38 PM.
leungw is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 46 Old 08-27-2013, 07:30 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Coast
Posts: 327
View Sawdustguy's Photo Album My Photos
I would run the base unto the stair skirt ending it with a return just short of the inside corner of the stair skirt. I would rip the top profile off some base and use that as the trim on the top of the skirt ending it just short of the corner of the wall so you had some of the wall color wrap around the corner and end at the return on the skirt trim.

George
Sawdustguy is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Sawdustguy For This Useful Post:
leungw (08-27-2013)
post #3 of 46 Old 08-27-2013, 08:18 PM
recently retired
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Seattle
Posts: 174
View Keith Mathewson's Photo Album My Photos
What is your skill level? There is the correct way to turn the corner and there is the work around.
Keith Mathewson is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 46 Old 08-27-2013, 10:04 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 22
View leungw's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Mathewson View Post
What is your skill level? There is the correct way to turn the corner and there is the work around.
I am definitely interested in the correct way.

I would say I am no pro. More like a hobbyist willing to learn. I have done casing and baseboard in the past, but they were all very straight forward. Have also done some basic built-in like an in-wall shelf.

EDIT.... I just noticed "Stairbuilder" under your name. I recently re-did my railing.
http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/repla...l-post-159191/

Last edited by leungw; 08-27-2013 at 10:18 PM.
leungw is offline  
post #5 of 46 Old 08-27-2013, 11:22 PM
recently retired
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Seattle
Posts: 174
View Keith Mathewson's Photo Album My Photos
The way one would turn a corner from rake to level without transitioning to level first requires two different sizes of trim. Since the amount of profile change is dependent in the rake angle it must be made to fit and as such is outside the skill sets of most finish carpenters, so I have some apprehensions about how successful this may be for you. If you are interested there is an article from "This is Carpentry" which goes into greater detail. http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2010/...board-returns/
Keith Mathewson is offline  
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Keith Mathewson For This Useful Post:
BigJim (08-28-2013), BZawat (08-28-2013), leungw (08-27-2013), trc65 (08-28-2013)
post #6 of 46 Old 08-27-2013, 11:52 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 22
View leungw's Photo Album My Photos
Thank you for the link. Helps a lot seeing the pictures.

I think I will do what the picture shows under "Example 1: Rake to Horizontal". I need to continue the baseboard around the narrow wall. Plus I am not very good with hand tools.
leungw is offline  
post #7 of 46 Old 08-28-2013, 07:40 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Coast
Posts: 327
View Sawdustguy's Photo Album My Photos
Post some pics when you are done. I want to learn,

Thanks

George
Sawdustguy is offline  
post #8 of 46 Old 08-28-2013, 08:06 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 22
View leungw's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by George G View Post
Post some pics when you are done. I want to learn.
I am learning too, but will post pictures when done. I will most likely work on it over the weekend.
leungw is offline  
post #9 of 46 Old 08-28-2013, 05:07 PM
Really underground garage
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: mnts of Va
Posts: 2,552
View BWSmith's Photo Album My Photos
Stair systems are full of small anamolies......you know the type.You do a project or part,3 guys look at it...they each ask why you didn't do it "this way"?Its just the way stairs and other complicated shapes and builds workout.

To your question....I don't have an answer without looking at how other places in that system look.Generally,you want consistency within the stairs as a whole.Look to see how other joints are....try not to make one better or worse than others.

There are exceptions to this.....and it usually is around the starting tread/newel.

Just like the English language being rather complicated sometimes......and even though a sentence may in fact be "perfect" in it's structure....."it sounds funny".That's how I explain these sm anamolies on stair systems.

Also,try to understand the climate or environ's that the original stairs were built in.Are you messin with something that will change any historic significance within the house?IOW's,part of the "old house charm" is infact these sm nuances that the original builders adhered to.Be careful changing things just for the sake of change.

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
BWSmith is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to BWSmith For This Useful Post:
leungw (08-29-2013)
post #10 of 46 Old 08-29-2013, 10:20 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 22
View leungw's Photo Album My Photos
BWSmith, this is just my own 30-year-old house. Nothing of historical value. It was a fixer-upper when we bought it. I removed all the baseboard and am starting from scratch.

Thank you for the pointer on consistency.
leungw is offline  
post #11 of 46 Old 09-01-2013, 04:55 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 22
View leungw's Photo Album My Photos
I started working on this, but just realized that one of the walls is really off. The middle section is "caved in" about 0.5". Any trick to make it less ugly when I put the base cap there?

Thanks!
Attached Images
 

Last edited by leungw; 09-01-2013 at 05:01 PM.
leungw is offline  
post #12 of 46 Old 09-01-2013, 08:10 PM
Senior Member
 
chopnhack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Somewhere sunny
Posts: 155
View chopnhack's Photo Album My Photos
The old trim carpenter saying comes to mind:

Bend and caulk or walk!

Seriously, there are a few thing you can do:

If you choose to repaint the area, you can float out the caved in section with setting type joint compound, if you are good get some 5 minute mud and you can prime in a short time, if you are like the rest of us get some 90 minute mud

Leave it as is and run your molding, caulk behind it (use a backer rod if you have to) chances are nobody will be looking at it as they use the stairs But also, the nice thing with moldings is that they create a shadow line, so even though the wall is out, the shadow behind it will hide a lot of the difference.

HTH
chopnhack is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to chopnhack For This Useful Post:
leungw (09-01-2013)
post #13 of 46 Old 09-01-2013, 09:07 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,110
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
can you find the nails?

If you can locate the nails, I'd pull them out and see if you can pull the drywall out a bit. A hand hole would be easy to fix. I use a 4" hole saw to get inside walls for wiring. Then I glue a strap of drywall in the wall across the hole for support when I replace the round plug out of the hole saw. A little mud around the edges and you're back to "good". You can slip a wedge in behind the drywall through the hole (s) to support it.

If you're good at mudding large areas then this method may seem overkill, if not, you don't have a big learning curve and a lot of sanding and leveling.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to woodnthings For This Useful Post:
leungw (09-01-2013)
post #14 of 46 Old 09-01-2013, 09:42 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Coast
Posts: 327
View Sawdustguy's Photo Album My Photos
This may be plaster not drywall.
Sawdustguy is offline  
post #15 of 46 Old 09-01-2013, 09:46 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,110
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
I think you're correct, if so.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by George G View Post
This may be plaster not drywall.
Disregard my entire post.

Quote from the OP:
BWSmith, this is just my own 30-year-old house. Nothing of historical value. It was a fixer-upper when we bought it. I removed all the baseboard and am starting from scratch.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #16 of 46 Old 09-01-2013, 09:59 PM
Senior Member
 
chopnhack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Somewhere sunny
Posts: 155
View chopnhack's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Disregard my entire post.

Quote from the OP:
BWSmith, this is just my own 30-year-old house. Nothing of historical value. It was a fixer-upper when we bought it. I removed all the baseboard and am starting from scratch.
At 30 years young there is a very good chance its drywall. Looking at the photo the OP provided, the two edges surely look like drywall where the trim was removed.
chopnhack is offline  
post #17 of 46 Old 09-01-2013, 10:13 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 22
View leungw's Photo Album My Photos
It's not just drywall. It's very wavy drywall....

Thank you for all the suggestions. I am leaning towards building it up with mud.

I tried pushing/bending the middle of the base cap towards the wall and it made both ends of the cap curved away from the wall.

I am not sure if I can remove all the nails and pull the drywall out. I like the idea but that section of the drywall is close to a joint and I am afraid the joint will crack and end up being even more work.

Last edited by leungw; 09-03-2013 at 08:40 AM.
leungw is offline  
post #18 of 46 Old 09-02-2013, 08:51 AM
Really underground garage
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: mnts of Va
Posts: 2,552
View BWSmith's Photo Album My Photos
Get a nice straight edge.........and it dosen't have to be expensive.We're talking drywall/plaster here,not checking jointer tables.

I have an ancient aluminum "style" off an old sliding galess door.Even has a nice handhold where the lock was.Looking down it's almost 7' length,it looks dang straight,haha.

Or use a nice 7' pce of plywood.This is your first drywall tool.Aluminum is really better because you can use them for finishing to.....like vaulted ceiling joints.The mud comes off better than plywood straight edges.

Now you get to go around your house and find every place thats "wavy",haha.Once you get a feel for it,you'll be amazed at what this simple tool does in the bigger scheme of things.Like,if/when you decide to put paneling up those stairs......USE THE STRAIGHTEDGE FIRST.getting ready to put a new vanity in?USE THE STRAIGH...well, you get the point.Use it everywhere......great for checking floors too.

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
BWSmith is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to BWSmith For This Useful Post:
leungw (09-02-2013)
post #19 of 46 Old 09-02-2013, 07:55 PM
Senior Member
 
chopnhack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Somewhere sunny
Posts: 155
View chopnhack's Photo Album My Photos
Agreed, I have an aluminum angle I picked up years ago, probably from one of the big boxes and it has come in handy time and time again. Great for floating floors. For the wall hopefully you can get away with a large taping knife, a 12" should be good. If not, you can use a 2' aluminum level if you have one on hand, just don't push too hard on it ;-) and make sure you wash it!
chopnhack is offline  
post #20 of 46 Old 09-15-2013, 08:27 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 22
View leungw's Photo Album My Photos
I finally found some time to tackle this.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	photo 6.jpg
Views:	42742
Size:	78.6 KB
ID:	79343  

Attached Images
    
leungw is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Table skirt MH1977 Design & Plans 2 08-03-2012 06:00 PM
Oval table skirt MH1977 Design & Plans 2 07-31-2012 08:08 AM
attaching table skirt to top apprentice General Woodworking Discussion 2 12-27-2010 09:32 PM
Building skirt on travel trailer Trailer Hand Tools 7 10-25-2010 01:19 AM
trimming stair stringer? henlij Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 11 11-24-2008 12:36 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome