Triming an inside Corner - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 23 Old 02-04-2011, 05:58 PM Thread Starter
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Triming an inside Corner

I am trying to trim the inside edge of a retangular end panal on my cabinetts. I thought I could use my compound miter saw for cutting the corners but now think I have to learn how to cope the 3/4 x 1/2 scotia trim to get the inside corners to close. Am I right on that or how could I use the miter saw?

Thanks a bunch
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post #2 of 23 Old 02-04-2011, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by sawdustman View Post
I am trying to trim the inside edge of a retangular end panal on my cabinetts. I thought I could use my compound miter saw for cutting the corners but now think I have to learn how to cope the 3/4 x 1/2 scotia trim to get the inside corners to close. Am I right on that or how could I use the miter saw?

Thanks a bunch

You could try coping it, which would be a preferred method, but I think for those sizes you'd get a better fit with the CMS.










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post #3 of 23 Old 02-04-2011, 08:39 PM Thread Starter
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I'm now thinking the angle cuts are the same as those for inside crown molding corners. Apparently I am doing 45 degree-type cove molding so the left and right bevel should be set at 30 degrees with the right and left miter angles at 35.3degrees. For the left side the "ceiling" contact should be against the guide fence with the fininshed piece on the left side of the blade. For the right side, the wall contact edge should be against the guide fence with the finished piece again on the left side of the blade. I think I will get some cheap cove material to practice with.

I can also see why some prefer to cope.

Does this make sense to anyone?

Oh, and I bought t used Dewalt 733 planer today so I can play with that during halftime. Go Pack
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post #4 of 23 Old 03-14-2011, 09:02 PM
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Trimming an inside corner

A lot of carpenters, myself included feel you are almost always best off to cope an inside corner no matter what type of trim your working with.
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post #5 of 23 Old 03-14-2011, 11:53 PM
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I myself cant cope with coping. My carpal tunnel makes it hard to control coping saw very long. The hand starts to cramp up. A few weeks back we went on a job and realized we left all three coping saw back in the shop. I needs to make about 6 copes on some baseboard. So when I pulled out the table saw my boss thought I had lost my mind. I used the CMS to make the most of the straight cuts. Then used the table saw with the blade up high and basicely carved with the edge of the blade. I DO NOT recommend a novice try this. Just saying it got me out of a pinch.
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post #6 of 23 Old 03-15-2011, 05:50 AM
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There are simply times when coping is not the prefered method.And this is entirely irrespective of how you cope..........and thats your skill,or equip.I can do a better than avg cope on most moulding using a sharp 10-12 pt handsaw.

There are times when inside mitres make more sense.BW
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post #7 of 23 Old 03-18-2011, 02:25 PM
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"Then used the table saw with the blade up high and basicely carved with the edge of the blade."

been doing it that way for a few years now. i can cope crown or base in about 2 min flat. i still rub the pencil along the mitered edge to highlight the cut for on the table saw. i bring my little delta job ts just for coping. sawdust do fly!
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post #8 of 23 Old 03-18-2011, 05:07 PM
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Coping with a coping saw is really a lot easier than manipulating a long piece of moulding on the tablesaw.








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post #9 of 23 Old 03-18-2011, 06:02 PM
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Coping with a coping saw is really a lot easier than manipulating a long piece of moulding on the tablesaw.

Ditto to that Cabbie. Never tried a tablesaw to cope. I use my p/c jig saw and finish up with a ratail file. Less than a minute.
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post #10 of 23 Old 03-21-2011, 12:08 AM
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Yea but you 2 guys are Experts. It's either a hatchet or a tablesaw for me. I have a harder time holding in to the little coping saw handle.

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post #11 of 23 Old 03-21-2011, 12:21 PM
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Coping with a coping saw is really a lot easier than manipulating a long piece of moulding on the tablesaw.











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post #12 of 23 Old 03-23-2011, 09:50 AM
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I have a pile of coping saws from the old days(now just sitting unused mostly) before I found out a jig saw works fantastic with a thin blade. Accurate and fast ,done 1000's that way.
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post #13 of 23 Old 03-25-2011, 01:14 PM
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I have a pile of coping saws from the old days(now just sitting unused mostly) before I found out a jig saw works fantastic with a thin blade. Accurate and fast ,done 1000's that way.
I do all mine with a jig saw now too. Sometimes I'll need a quick pass with a flat or round file to tune up a bit. Not usually though.
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post #14 of 23 Old 03-25-2011, 01:32 PM
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Here is one of the best woodworkers I know coping 5-1/4" maple crown with a grinder. One minute, fifteen seconds, total.


Last edited by Willie T; 03-25-2011 at 01:34 PM.
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post #15 of 23 Old 03-25-2011, 01:44 PM
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I've seen that video before but I've never tried it. Should give it a go sometime. Don't really like all the saw dust flying around though. Sometimes I actually get sick of sawdust.
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post #16 of 23 Old 03-25-2011, 01:48 PM
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I snapped my last coping saw blade at work and I remembered seeing this video. I tried it on some maple crown for a kitchen we were re doing. It worked. Lots of dust indeed.

I think I prefer the coping saw

"Nathan needs some Huggies.......I'll be out directly"
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post #17 of 23 Old 03-25-2011, 02:27 PM
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Here is one of the best woodworkers I know coping 5-1/4" maple crown with a grinder. One minute, fifteen seconds, total.
Willie...The video ended before we could see the fit.








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post #18 of 23 Old 03-25-2011, 02:29 PM
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Willie...The video ended before we could see the fit..

Good point - might be fast but....
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post #19 of 23 Old 03-25-2011, 03:00 PM
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You guys still continue to tickle me. Comments like those should be embarrassing to woodworkers.

Get on over to http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/index.php and check out Basswood's work for yourselves. He's the one in the video. His real name is Brian Campbell, and I am fairly sure at least some of you have seen him and his work in woodworking magazines.

This search for his name and the word "crown" (shown below this sentence) might give you some idea that he can manage to get his joints to come fairly close to fitting.

http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/s...archid=2314533

And here is a link to a few of his articles on some of his work. I think you might enjoy them.

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/auth...-campbell.aspx?

Also some random photos of his work and interests......

http://s436.photobucket.com/albums/q...view=slideshow

Last edited by Willie T; 03-25-2011 at 03:33 PM.
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post #20 of 23 Old 03-28-2011, 02:21 AM
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I am trying to trim the inside edge of a retangular end panal on my cabinetts. I thought I could use my compound miter saw for cutting the corners but now think I have to learn how to cope the 3/4 x 1/2 scotia trim to get the inside corners to close. Am I right on that or how could I use the miter saw?

Thanks a bunch
I know I'm coming in late to this thread, but
Learning to cope will be a great asset for you as a woodworker. It's not hard to achieve just take some scrap trim, miter it and start coping.

You will always learn by doing, so I've learned.
Only trying to help ~Leon~
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