Trim on a cabinet face: how would you do it? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 01-28-2013, 08:45 PM Thread Starter
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Trim on a cabinet face: how would you do it?

As I look around at the cabinets in my kitchen (traditional mission style, trim forms "boxes") I see this:



OK, pretty standard stuff there. But what if I wanted two boxes on the same face?

Option #1:


Option #2:


Or perhaps something else entirely? Option #2 looks right to me, but then again, it's just a sketch. What do you cabinet pros say?
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post #2 of 15 Old 01-28-2013, 10:30 PM
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I'm not a pro, but I did sleep at a Holiday Inn one time. I'd go for option two. Like you said, it just looks right. Option one, OTOH, kinda gives me the willies. Perhaps someone can explain that.
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post #3 of 15 Old 01-28-2013, 10:37 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry, Don... Didn't mean to freak you out with option #1! But you bring up a good point: why is it exactly that #2 just looks better?
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post #4 of 15 Old 01-28-2013, 10:39 PM
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Option 2 is the correct way

Learning more about tools everyday
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post #5 of 15 Old 01-28-2013, 11:23 PM
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Option two is the correct way. The stiles on the ends should always run the full length with the rails running in between them. Then any intermediate stiles run in between the rails.

Check out some of my custom stairs
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post #6 of 15 Old 01-29-2013, 12:08 AM
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Option 2

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
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post #7 of 15 Old 01-29-2013, 12:14 AM
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Option 2, couldn't say why, Its just more pleasing to my eye.

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

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post #8 of 15 Old 01-29-2013, 08:02 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the feedback! I think the consensus is definitely Option #2, but if anyone has some insight as to the reason why it's the right way to do it, or why it's more aesthetically pleasing, I'd be interested to hear it.
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post #9 of 15 Old 01-29-2013, 08:45 AM
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Because that's the way it's been done for centuries. Only recently has #1 come about because it's quicker and only uses 2 different sizes instead of 3. Plus I think it looks better.

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
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post #10 of 15 Old 01-29-2013, 08:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug S View Post
Thanks for the feedback! I think the consensus is definitely Option #2, but if anyone has some insight as to the reason why it's the right way to do it, or why it's more aesthetically pleasing, I'd be interested to hear it.
Well, there are many explanations why option 2 is better. Many are based on aesthetic opinion...

With the outside stiles full length, it provides for a solid piece of wood looking at a finished end.

It also gives maximum structure for carrying a hinge.

It allows for more (better) coverage (and strength) for the end of the cabinet to the upper and lower piece (the joint).

It allows for less joint line to show from the side and the front if a door is overlaid.

With whatever method is used for the joinery, with the stiles full length, a M&T, or dowels provide axis strength for the lateral stresses of a hinged door.

If the rails ran through...

If hinges were used, they would be close to the joint line.

The joint between the stile and the rail would be more obvious, in relation to having them vertically at the base and top. IOW, the vertical grain appearance from the front would be interrupted by the rails.

And for other non specific, unexplainable reasons, hot air rises, and crime doesn't pay (so they say). And who are they?

The sky is blue, or so they say...
But what is blue and who are they?





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post #11 of 15 Old 01-29-2013, 09:34 AM
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Option 2. Wood moves across the width. If you used option 1 the center stile would stick up or down with humidity changes. It also breaks the continuity.
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post #12 of 15 Old 01-29-2013, 09:46 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the additional info; exactly what I was looking for!
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post #13 of 15 Old 01-31-2013, 01:51 PM
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I'll throw another thought out there just to be a PITA. (let it be known that I agree with the rest of the group for normal purposes and reasons). I could see using option A *if* you were doing a top hinged (3 hinge) cabinet that opens from the bottom, like some of those you see above a normal upper kitchen cabinet with tall ceilings. I would think it would give more structure and support to the center hinge.

And now, back to your regular programming.
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post #14 of 15 Old 02-04-2013, 11:05 AM
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I would pick door number two.

The new washer and dryer are there, behind door number one is a toaster!

As NORM always says...
"and don't forget to wear these, safety glasses"
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post #15 of 15 Old 02-20-2013, 10:26 PM
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Fung Shway man. It's all about flow ya know.
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