Thoughts / Opinions on Crown Molding - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 09-11-2013, 01:49 PM Thread Starter
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Thoughts / Opinions on Crown Molding

We have a two story colonial house and are in process of redecorating. We have crown molding in the dining room, the first floor study, foyer / upstairs hall combo, and will be added to the great room. The trim is all stained oak as is the crown molding.

Here is my question, will crown molding look good / be appropriate in the second floor bedrooms or will it be too much? This is only 3 1/2" crown nothing massive.This is also planned to be stained to match the existing trim. The eat in kitchen is also planned to eventually have crown.

Thanks


George
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post #2 of 19 Old 09-11-2013, 02:47 PM
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Certainly aren't any rules against this, why not?
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post #3 of 19 Old 09-11-2013, 06:27 PM
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I've done the better parts of 2 houses with CM. I like it carried throughout the home as a finishing touch, matching all the rest of the trim, no place left out. If you can afford it all, do it. Look at it for a year.
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post #4 of 19 Old 09-11-2013, 08:22 PM
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I'm not big on colonial revival homes, but in better craftsman-era home you often expect to see consistent trim throughout the house.

If your second floor is full-height, crown is as appropriate there as it is one your first floor. Not putting crown in all your rooms makes them seem noticeably cheaper quality than the main floor. It's a subtle thing that works on a subconcious level.

To me, it's a bit like trim and siding that's only on the front of the house. Is you house just a facade, or a unified whole?
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post #5 of 19 Old 09-11-2013, 09:57 PM
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Agreed, when trimming out a house, if its worth it, trim out completely.
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post #6 of 19 Old 09-12-2013, 11:46 AM
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its not uncommon to see a "lesser" crown moulding on the second floor rooms in our area. maybe 2 1/4" cove or so.
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post #7 of 19 Old 09-21-2013, 03:06 PM
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While I agree with consistency with the trim throughout the house there is a certain amount of detraction involved with the same crown throughout the house. It makes the impression of the main rooms less impressive and becomes almost a nonchalant part of the scenery.

While generally speaking, the size of the crown is dictated by ceiling heights, it is certainly appropriate to use smaller size crown in the upstairs rooms.I don't know what profile crown you have but a similar profile in a smaller size will give you consistency and still allow the main rooms more impact.

I'm not a big fan of cove mould as a ceiling treatment in general ( especially with crown in other rooms )- but think bed mould is a good alternative.
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post #8 of 19 Old 10-13-2013, 01:13 AM
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I need that, but how can I post here screen shots... Hey do explain me.. I am waiting...

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post #9 of 19 Old 10-14-2013, 01:54 AM
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Either link them to your post from a 3rd party service or upload them into your account's "photo album" and link from there.
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post #10 of 19 Old 10-14-2013, 07:28 AM
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IMO, crown doesn't have to match from floor to floor, but should if both rooms or areas can be viewed together. Crown can add quite a bit of dimension to a room. For some applications, a cove may be the right touch.





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post #11 of 19 Old 10-14-2013, 10:41 PM
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Crown molding can go anywhere. I did a remodel a couple of years ago where we installed crown molding in a finished basement. Historically though I think either no crown or much smaller crown is used in upper floors.
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post #12 of 19 Old 10-15-2013, 03:47 AM
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I think it all depends on how close and how large the rooms are. Moldings tend to be better in small doses in smaller rooms.

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post #13 of 19 Old 10-30-2013, 07:22 PM
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Do it!

When people ask me where to install the crown, I say everywhere but your closets...unless you want those done too!

Not just to make money, but I really think it makes a home look complete with all the rooms done with crown molding. We usually use the same trim profile throughout and will only vary the size of the molding if the ceiling requires it. Say a 6" crown is going throughout the house but they have a 20' entry ceiling, we'll bump that crown up to an 8" in the same style.

Not to mention, I have several relatives that buy houses at auctions and flip them ASAP. All the houses where the trim is all done up sell much faster than those without...
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post #14 of 19 Old 11-03-2013, 10:02 AM
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We only have it in our dinning room. I think it can be to much. Different tasts.
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post #15 of 19 Old 11-07-2013, 09:46 AM
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IMO I would install crown moulding on all floors, as I think consistency needs to be maintained in design throughout. Ceiling height reflects the size of the crown so just as TemeculaPaul said, using the same style of moulding but in different heights for different ceiling heights is the way to do it.
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post #16 of 19 Old 11-27-2013, 04:44 PM
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I'm in the "put it everywhere" camp. I put up ~1500ft of trim over the last year in our house. Everything has crown including the bathrooms, closets, and laundry.
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post #17 of 19 Old 11-27-2013, 11:30 PM
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Question Mold Prevention behind crown molding

Does anyone know a way to keep mold/mildew from occurring behind crown molding in a bathroom. We're considering having crown molding in the bathroom and on the west coast, the relative humidity quite often hovers in the 50-75+ % range and mold/mildew is an ongoing problem on top of the extra humnidity from showers, baths, etc.
Please let me know if this is not the appropriate thread.

Thanks in advance,
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post #18 of 19 Old 11-29-2013, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xsmem1 View Post
Does anyone know a way to keep mold/mildew from occurring behind crown molding in a bathroom. We're considering having crown molding in the bathroom and on the west coast, the relative humidity quite often hovers in the 50-75+ % range and mold/mildew is an ongoing problem on top of the extra humnidity from showers, baths, etc.
Please let me know if this is not the appropriate thread.

Thanks in advance,
Xsmem
Here in Florida we're the "Mildew Capitol " of the country.
There are a few ways to prevent mildew build up. You can caulk the upper and lower edge if the molding is painted, or place batt insulation behind it. An extreme measure would be to blow expanding foam behind, (not recommended.) The best thing to do is to have an exhaust fan and remove the humidity. A fan with an open window works the best.
(Exhaust Fans are now code in Fla. baths)
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post #19 of 19 Old 11-30-2013, 03:07 PM
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We don't have that problem here but a couple of things come to mind. First and foremost- as already mentioned - caulk! Mildew can't form where moisture can't get. Secondly- just as previously mentioned- reduce the humidity, but I'll add- whole house de-humidifier. ...

Now for the little extras- maybe plastic crown; don't like it, but what the hey... The other thing is those marine paints with anti-mildew additves behind the crown and wall/ ceiling surfaces. Finally- quality oil based primer.
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