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post #1 of 15 Old 06-29-2012, 02:14 AM Thread Starter
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A Test

In building this custom bookcase I deemed it prudent to perform a "Structural Integrity Test" (passed with flying colors!)

I hate "hammer-tracks...

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post #2 of 15 Old 06-29-2012, 02:36 AM
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Looks like your waiting for someone to hand you a coldie

I know a few twice your size of you want to up the anti and re-test the structural integrity. Otherwise it looks like a fine job

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post #3 of 15 Old 06-29-2012, 03:25 AM Thread Starter
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Looks like your waiting for someone to hand you a coldie

I know a few twice your size of you want to up the anti and re-test the structural integrity. Otherwise it looks like a fine job

Dave The Turning Cowboy
Thanks... still got a ways to go yet. Shutting down for a long weekend of travel with the family. Get back to it next week. :-)
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post #4 of 15 Old 06-29-2012, 04:42 AM
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Can't get down? Did you do the test #2 which is jumping up and down? Sure looks like it passed to me. One of my favorite things to do in front of a client is to get into a wall hung cabinet, if I can fit...and say "I not only stand behind my work, I stand in/on it".

Properly configured and assembled, most work exceeds the capacity of what the intended use requires. That is paramount because the builder is liable for what he/she makes and installs. It's just as easy to do it right the first time.






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post #5 of 15 Old 06-29-2012, 08:34 AM Thread Starter
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[QUOTE=cabinetman;351284]Can't get down? Did you do the test #2 which is jumping up and down? Sure looks like it passed to me. One of my favorite things to do in front of a client is to get into a wall hung cabinet, if I can fit...and say "I not only stand behind my work, I stand in/on it".

Properly configured and assembled, most work exceeds the capacity of what the intended use requires. That is paramount because the builder is liable for what he/she makes and installs. It's just as easy to do it right the first time.



In 1971 when I was in Nursing School I was doing my Pediatric rotation. One of my patients, a young boy, was seriously injured in a new home which his parents had custom built.

Cause: The fireplace fell on top of him.

The little shaver was in the hospital a good while. Don't know all the details but I'm sure some sort of lawsuit was carried out by the parents. One case I will never forget.
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post #6 of 15 Old 06-29-2012, 08:53 AM
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News like that is very upsetting. I always figure that overbuilding can't hurt. We as craftsmen can't depend on the users of our goods to be careful. It's always in the back of my mind to think what could go wrong. Do cabinets just "uninstall" and fall on their own? Or will some child open a door and swing from the handle.

Case in point. I built and installed a desk system for an elderly lady. It was basically two pedestals with a kneehole, and upper cabinets the length of the desktop.

She called me on a call back about a week or so later that a door above the desk was "falling off". Well, my doors just don't fall off. I go there to find one door right above the desk where she sits was loose hanging from one hinge. She denied pulling on it, but to make a long story short, she had trouble getting up from her chair, and would grab the handle for that door to help herself up.

So, there is no degree of predictability. There are risks involved with this kind of work. I just hope the outcomes aren't decided in a courtroom or a hospital.





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post #7 of 15 Old 06-30-2012, 11:04 AM
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"What if..."

Whether it be a hobbyist or a professional, the builder must figure as much as possible that could go wrong, (yeah, something along Murphy’s Law). But then along comes a situation as CabinetMan posted. What then? Repair or replace and give warning(s) to the owner to not do a repeat of the action that caused the needed repair/replacement. In this day and age, a good guess is that 1 in 50 will sue you for faulty workmanship/product. The one thing that is on the side of the builder-contractor is diligence in thinking “what if…” and coming up with a solution. But one would never think that an elderly person would do as she did by using the door to help her up and out of the chair. But yet there is that “what if…”.
And it looks that Gougher past with flying colors! BUT, what if you fell asleep while testing, and fell to the floor??
Roger in the swamp of Florida
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post #8 of 15 Old 06-30-2012, 11:56 AM
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Whether it be a hobbyist or a professional, the builder must figure as much as possible that could go wrong, (yeah, something along Murphy’s Law). But then along comes a situation as CabinetMan posted. What then? Repair or replace and give warning(s) to the owner to not do a repeat of the action that caused the needed repair/replacement. In this day and age, a good guess is that 1 in 50 will sue you for faulty workmanship/product. The one thing that is on the side of the builder-contractor is diligence in thinking “what if…” and coming up with a solution. But one would never think that an elderly person would do as she did by using the door to help her up and out of the chair. But yet there is that “what if…”.
And it looks that Gougher past with flying colors! BUT, what if you fell asleep while testing, and fell to the floor??
Roger in the swamp of Florida



Glad to see our Florida count is building. You're right, covering all the "what if's" would be close to impossible. And even if it would be possible, a situation like the elderly lady would still be unpreventable.

So, all we can do is our best. We can utilize good materials, follow prudent construction and assembly parameters, and perform installation correctly. Shortcuts only save time. I still prefer traditional methods.







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post #9 of 15 Old 06-30-2012, 01:39 PM
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Mike, that's why you're a professional

wood worker and a good one at that. You said it all in a short space.
Thanks for the welcome; had to get my feet wet over here. How many other Florida fellows have we here?
Sorry about hijacking your thread Gougher, and back on track; your book case looks really good and does a great job of accenting those two brick walls. What color are you going with?
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post #10 of 15 Old 07-02-2012, 10:51 AM Thread Starter
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Final test for substantial sturdiness! ( I am a mere 206lbs) My Harley-Davidson books are big and heavy. HAW!



Now back to the woodshop for jointing, sanding, cutting, and routing the final perimeter facing out of yellow poplar. Then the staining and finishing. A good bit of work left to do yet. Starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

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post #11 of 15 Old 07-02-2012, 10:53 AM Thread Starter
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wood worker and a good one at that. You said it all in a short space.
Thanks for the welcome; had to get my feet wet over here. How many other Florida fellows have we here?
Sorry about hijacking your thread Gougher, and back on track; your book case looks really good and does a great job of accenting those two brick walls. What color are you going with?

No problem RAF... (Thanks pal)

I am using a special mixture of Minwax stain (provincial and cherry) and Pratt and Lambert clear satin varnish.
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post #12 of 15 Old 07-03-2012, 11:07 AM
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THAT will give it detail

and accent, "Minwax stain (provincial and cherry)". We all are just waiting for your finished case and see the pictures of a piece of art. And at 206 pounds, those shelves are holding up very well; at least no books are gonna break it!
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post #13 of 15 Old 07-03-2012, 03:27 PM Thread Starter
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and accent, "Minwax stain (provincial and cherry)". We all are just waiting for your finished case and see the pictures of a piece of art. And at 206 pounds, those shelves are holding up very well; at least no books are gonna break it!
RAF.... when I get it all finished I am going to post some better images. NOT my phone camera images. I will avoid taking pics of "hammertracks" if at all possible. It has been a long time since I have done anything close to this and my hammer to finishing nail aim has withered a bit.
Working in the shop today. Then headed to my finishing table.
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post #14 of 15 Old 07-03-2012, 05:16 PM
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She's looking good my friend

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post #15 of 15 Old 11-13-2012, 11:47 PM
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A Test

You are right and i totally agree with you.I like your post thanx for sharing it.

Last edited by Brad555; 12-12-2012 at 06:20 AM.
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