Stuck on Handrail - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 28 Old 07-17-2014, 12:20 AM
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Check out this link, it tells you how to cut the fitting and how to connect it to the rail. Just one more word of advice, get a card scrapper and get all of the glue off the newel while you have the fitting off, it will save you much headache when you start to stain the stairs.
http://www.ljsmith.net/assets/files/...stallation.pdf

http://www.diychatroom.com/
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post #22 of 28 Old 07-17-2014, 12:51 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Mathewson View Post
Do as instructed, always cut the rail square.
Might I ask why this is the case?
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post #23 of 28 Old 07-17-2014, 02:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terjod19 View Post
Might I ask why this is the case?
I am not Keith and but the reason IMHO is this: example, butt the rail into the fitting, now pivot the rail down, at the top of the stairs, notice at the fitting how there is a hump formed, it is not a smooth transition from the rail on through the fitting. That is the reason you cut the fitting, you could cut the rail all day long and you would still have the hump, it is only when the curve in the fitting is cut at the proper point will there be a smooth transition from the rail through the fitting.

I am sure Keith can explain it much better than me.

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post #24 of 28 Old 07-17-2014, 08:39 PM
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There was a time when the upeasing was made to match the pitch of the stair, then came mass produced stair-parts. In order for one easing to be able to be used for every circumstance the upeasing was made at a fairly short radius and was made for a larger portion of the circle than necessary. Think of the straight handrail as a vector, you are looking for the tangent point on the curve where a vector will match the rake angle of your stairs. That is the point where you cut the fitting on the radial line.

Take a look at old staircases, most of the time you see them in movies, and notice how much longer the upeasing and overeasings are, then ask yourself which you think looks better...
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post #25 of 28 Old 07-17-2014, 11:34 PM Thread Starter
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Great!

I think I've got it figured out. I bought a piece of 12 inch stock and practiced the miter cuts on it, it seemed to be about 15 degrees or so and i was getting perfect alignment.

BUT, I decided to go with most of your advice and cut the easement itself, I brought my straight rail down past the easement to where the rounded over edge (the trim piece riding the bottom of the rail) of both pieces, met up. With this, I scribed the line and used a coping saw to cut the easement out, and they butted up perfectly, as with the pitch of the stair case.
I'll post pictures tomorrow when I'm not so tired and maybe have it mounted.

I can't thank you all enough for helping out this novice! Now I'm going to start a thread in woodworking to figure out how I can get started with that, as it's becoming an obsession of mine that I'm looking forward to moving onto.

Thanks again!
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post #26 of 28 Old 07-20-2014, 10:23 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Mathewson View Post
There was a time when the upeasing was made to match the pitch of the stair, then came mass produced stair-parts. In order for one easing to be able to be used for every circumstance the upeasing was made at a fairly short radius and was made for a larger portion of the circle than necessary. Think of the straight handrail as a vector, you are looking for the tangent point on the curve where a vector will match the rake angle of your stairs. That is the point where you cut the fitting on the radial line.

Take a look at old staircases, most of the time you see them in movies, and notice how much longer the upeasing and overeasings are, then ask yourself which you think looks better...
I just wanted to comment again on how beautifully that was phrased for me, Keith. Thank you so much!
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post #27 of 28 Old 07-20-2014, 07:52 PM
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Personally I like the look of a wreathed handrail but the only time I use them is when I am doing a curved rail where the pitch changes, you just can't make it look good with an easing or butt joint. For everything else I use Commercial fittings which are easy to install and don't cost much. They keep the price way down.
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post #28 of 28 Old 07-21-2014, 08:50 PM
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You make a good point about wreathed fittings- they are designed to handle pitch changes and are more expensive but they aren't so much more expensive that it would greatly impact the budget of a house upper-middle class or above. A greater reason that they are not used more may be that many people are no longer familiar with them and don't know that there is a option.

Wreathed fittings take a lot of work to learn to layout and even more to learn how to make them but there are a number of guys around the country make them for stairbuilders and at a price which is not particularly high. Upeasings and overeasings are a little harder to understand why they are not made more often. They are single point radius work and not diffucult to make on a shaper.
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