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post #1 of 15 Old 03-27-2015, 05:35 PM Thread Starter
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Sanding drywall

I'm going to be doing this to a wall in my bedroom. Question I have is that locally I can't get good thin sheet goods to put on the whole wall as backing in order to smooth it out (I have drywall). I can get hardboard I guess which is 1/4 inch but the 1/4 plywood at HD is abysmal. I want to have the whole wall look smooth like trim.

Is there an easyish effective way to sand painted drywall?
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post #2 of 15 Old 03-27-2015, 05:37 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry...here is the pic
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post #3 of 15 Old 03-27-2015, 06:19 PM
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With a wall like that just prime and sand the primer until you get the surface to your liking and then topcoat. I would recommend spraying both the primer and topcoat.
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post #4 of 15 Old 03-27-2015, 07:20 PM
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1/4" MDF would give you the smooth base your looking for. Or paint and sand till its smooth... I suspect that might take a while...
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post #5 of 15 Old 03-27-2015, 07:46 PM
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which is the surface you are referring to?

You would start with a large wall surface, prime sand and then paint. Then add your hardboard or MFD strips to get the panel look. Prepaint and sand them as well before installation. Cut the horizontals all the same lengths, after calculating the spacing and work from right to left as you go across. Then you'll only have to "fit" that is cut precisely to length, the last ones in. Do a dry fit on the floor or with painters tape to make certain the spacing works!

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 15 Old 03-27-2015, 08:21 PM
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You can prime drywall with hi-build primer and sand it afterward to get it pretty smooth. There's something about it though; no how smooth you get it, it will still look like drywall for some reason.
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post #7 of 15 Old 03-27-2015, 10:18 PM
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I like the look you plan to put on your wall.
If you plan to paint the paneling, you could use MDF or Masonite for a smooth paintable surface. Available in 1/8" and 1/4" thickness, 4X 8 sheets.
This could go directly over your drywall and no sanding would be required on the drywall which is a very dusty job you want to avoid.
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post #8 of 15 Old 03-28-2015, 08:59 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
With a wall like that just prime and sand the primer until you get the surface to your liking and then topcoat. I would recommend spraying both the primer and topcoat.
Want to as well but It's in my bedroom and spraying latex with an airless I imagine would create a mushroom cloud of paint. I have sprayed latex with my hvlp before but I had to thin it so much the sheen was lost.
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post #9 of 15 Old 03-28-2015, 09:00 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
You can prime drywall with hi-build primer and sand it afterward to get it pretty smooth. There's something about it though; no how smooth you get it, it will still look like drywall for some reason.
I have found that as well. Looks better but still bumpy.
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post #10 of 15 Old 03-28-2015, 09:01 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Was2nd
I like the look you plan to put on your wall.
If you plan to paint the paneling, you could use MDF or Masonite for a smooth paintable surface. Available in 1/8" and 1/4" thickness, 4X 8 sheets.
This could go directly over your drywall and no sanding would be required on the drywall which is a very dusty job you want to avoid.
I can only find hardboard in 1/4 thickness. Not sure it behaves the same as MDF?
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post #11 of 15 Old 03-28-2015, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by was2ndlast View Post
Want to as well but It's in my bedroom and spraying latex with an airless I imagine would create a mushroom cloud of paint. I have sprayed latex with my hvlp before but I had to thin it so much the sheen was lost.
No, you can't hardly spray latex with a cup gun. You have to either use an airless or a conventional gun rigged up with a pressure pot. There shouldn't be much of a cloud with an airless. Usually if you close off the room and cover the floor and furniture with drop cloths you don't have much of a problem with overspray. Last month I finished a kitchen for someone with latex paint and I just covered the floor in the immediate area. The rest of the house was empty of furniture so all that was exposed was the floor. If left a fine layer of dust on the floor but nothing stuck. I did open the house up and put an exhaust fan in the door to draw as much outside as I could.
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post #12 of 15 Old 03-28-2015, 11:18 AM Thread Starter
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If I use latex on MDF I have to use an oil based primer sealer?
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post #13 of 15 Old 03-28-2015, 02:24 PM
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If I use latex on MDF I have to use an oil based primer sealer?
It would probably go on a little smoother however there is no reason you can't use a water based primer. It's not so much water it will cause the MDF to swell up. Regardless of the primer you use I would recommend sanding the face of the MDF before priming. The surface of the sheets has a high level of formaldehyde and it sometimes has a adverse reaction with finishes. Some brands are worse than others. I've just got in the habit of sanding all MDF. I've seen lacquer take days to dry on that stuff instead of minutes.
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post #14 of 15 Old 04-08-2015, 07:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by was2ndlast
If I use latex on MDF I have to use an oil based primer sealer?
Bin shellac primer. Drys quick, sands like chalk. I usually have it tinted.
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post #15 of 15 Old 04-09-2015, 03:48 PM
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Bedroom wall treatment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by was2ndlast View Post
If I use latex on MDF I have to use an oil based primer sealer?
No, it's not necessary to use oil primer or oil paint. It's a matter of preference. Since this is not a kitchen or a bath, I would use latex.
Someone else suggested you spray it. You said you were concerned about spraying in your bedroom. Consider laying the large panels flat across two sawhorses outside and spray each panel outdoors. Latex drys very quickly.
You can install the painted pieces and you will only need to touch-up with a paint brush. You could even use different types of paint. Like flat on the panels and semi-gloss on all the molding-trim pieces. It will look sharp.
Jim
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