Routing a Large Picture Frame (too much for rookie)? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 09-20-2010, 10:00 PM Thread Starter
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Routing a Large Picture Frame (too much for rookie)?

A recent bathroom remodel has left me with a 6ft x 3'6" mirror. I would like to frame the mirror and hang it in my hallway.

Today I went to Home Depot to see about getting some molding to that I could use for the frame. The stuff my wife liked was crown molding (see pic below) and wouldn't sit flush on the mirror and I can't think of any good way to make it work (also the wood seemed a little too thin where I would want to rabbit for the mirror to sit) .





My question to you:

I'm fairly handy, but new to woodworking, and I'm wondering if routing something like the pictures show above (the piece my wife likes) is over my head?

I have a router/router table, but would need to get bits for this type of project. I was wondering if these would get me something similar to what's shown above: http://www.woodline.com/p-1740-picture-frame-set.aspx

The frame would be about 4 1/2" wide and I'd probably make it about 2" deep. Roughly following something like this: http://www.pictureframes.com/html/vi...html?UW2_p.gif


But wider.

I'm not too concerned about measuring, cutting, doing the joints, etc....I've just never done any decorative routing.

Is this over my head? Thoughts?

(Also, I'm hoping not to just mount this thing to the wall and then frame around it. I am wanting to frame it like a picture, making it moveable if we ever chose to relocate it).
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post #2 of 18 Old 09-20-2010, 10:26 PM
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Making a 4 1/2 inch profile with a router is a fairly tall order. It will take multiple passes and a fair amount of skill. I would suggest buying some mold already made and make your frame out of that.

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post #3 of 18 Old 09-21-2010, 01:13 AM Thread Starter
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Exactly what I needed to know!

I'll save myself the frustration and tears and keep shopping for some molding that is both thick enough and to the wife's liking.

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post #4 of 18 Old 09-21-2010, 02:22 AM
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You could always build up the molding. Split it into three different pieces with the profiles so the cutting isn't so large, then combine the three to make the single piece. That's what I did with my last picture frame build. It was two part construction with profile's cut into one board, then the second board and the pieces were combined via a rabbet. If you look at your crown molding and break down the profiles WITHIN the single profile, you'll find fairly common and inexpensive router profiles. Not a huge bit. That being said, it may just be easier and cheaper to go to a molding shop and see if they can use a shaper and cut you crown molding that is thicker.
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post #5 of 18 Old 09-22-2010, 08:32 PM
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I recently had the same situation trying to figure out how I could frame a mirror I had left over from a job. I Kind of went through the same thought process then my wife said you are trying to make it to complicated. Anyway she showed me the style she wanted. It was a very simple idea using flat stock, putting a bevel on it and pocket screwing it all together. To touch off I put some simple molding on the top to dress it up.
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post #6 of 18 Old 09-23-2010, 06:26 AM
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Very nice NYww......just a small spot of info for anyone building mirror frames.You can see the reflection of the rabbit on the backside of frame.So make sure you finish it to match face.

rdiggidy,you want to be careful when utilzing certain profiles(crown being one)for or on places that they aren't intended.Not that it can't or shouldn't be done..........just realize in some cases,well intentioned designs can suffer.If theres ever any question,I hit our reference books and dig a little.BW
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post #7 of 18 Old 09-23-2010, 06:45 AM
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Suggestion

Just rip away the bottom 1/2" from the molding leaving enough stock to form the rabbet you show.It just won't be as wide in total, but still at 4" should look just fine. You can roundover the the edge, maybe a 3/16 rad, then make your rabbet for the glass from the backside. That's what I would do. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 18 Old 09-23-2010, 09:47 AM
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Build a box around mirror then put mirror in side then add molding on the board to cover it up it will be on the back of the mirror so you will only see moulding. I did this before works well. But with a large mirror there is alot of weight to hold up I would think about making the mirror smaller say 3ftx3ft less weight but still will be heavy good luck. Joe

Last edited by wood138; 09-23-2010 at 10:11 AM.
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post #9 of 18 Old 09-24-2010, 12:55 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks to all for the suggestions and recommendations.

NYwoodworks: that looks sharp! They have that molding at our local Lowe's, but can't sell the wife on it :-(

woodnthings: I had considered this initially (without the idea of "finishing" the new cut with a routing job) and discounted it because of the fear the newly cut edge wouldn't look that great. With the added suggestion to round the newly cut edge, I think I'm going to give this a try.

Thanks again to all for the suggestion. I'll post pics (succeed or not).
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post #10 of 18 Old 09-26-2010, 08:45 AM
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If the mirror and the frame are going to "free-hang" from the wall as one unit, I don't think the molding you show will support it. You need to make some type of frame for the mirror that will support the weight and then trim it out with the crown. Personally, I'd bag the crown idea and use a mold or frame that is designed to be laid flat on the hanging surface.
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post #11 of 18 Old 02-20-2012, 03:59 PM
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I did this frame with a leftover builder-grade mirror and the worst piece of plywood I had - and what a horrible piece of wood it was! Came out beautiful in the end, though. I step-by-stepped it on my blog. If you take a look I think you'll see that the process is pretty simple. I didn't go the glue-on-mirror route. I wanted the mirror to actually recess into the frame, in case we wanted to move it at any time. To really dress up this frame I could have routed my own thin trim or bought some to edge the outside and the inside. My goal was to spend $0, which happened. Imagine how nice you can make this if you put a few bucks into it. Hope it helps.

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post #12 of 18 Old 02-20-2012, 06:19 PM
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Did fine till ya got out the pocket holes.

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post #13 of 18 Old 02-22-2012, 12:23 AM
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seriously?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
Did fine till ya got out the pocket holes.
wow. i appreciate the "compliment." i don't understand everyone's hatred for the pocket holes on this site. pretty sad.
Wait, I get it, only the most pure form of woodworking can possibly be tolerated or given any respect, right? Well i guess from now on i had better start cutting down my own trees and planing my wood by hand with tools i made by hand. yeah, maybe then it might be good enough for all the salty master craftsmen on this site?
anyways. i'll continue to appreciate everyone [I]else's[I] work for what it is.
thanks for the interest, anyway. appreciate the time you took to check it out.
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post #14 of 18 Old 02-22-2012, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYandSIMPLIFY View Post
wow. i appreciate the "compliment." i don't understand everyone's hatred for the pocket holes on this site. pretty sad.
Wait, I get it, only the most pure form of woodworking can possibly be tolerated or given any respect, right? Well i guess from now on i had better start cutting down my own trees and planing my wood by hand with tools i made by hand. yeah, maybe then it might be good enough for all the salty master craftsmen on this site?
anyways. i'll continue to appreciate everyone [I]else's[I] work for what it is.
thanks for the interest, anyway. appreciate the time you took to check it out.
Nope - not at all. I use pocket holes regularly... when appropriate to be used. Screws are iffy in plywood anyway and, from your description of the plywood being used, should not have been used for anything supporting the weight of the mirror.
I do get a little irritated with the "I got a new hammer so everything must be a nail" mentality.

John

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post #15 of 18 Old 02-23-2012, 12:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
Nope - not at all. I use pocket holes regularly... when appropriate to be used. Screws are iffy in plywood anyway and, from your description of the plywood being used, should not have been used for anything supporting the weight of the mirror.
I do get a little irritated with the "I got a new hammer so everything must be a nail" mentality.
Gotcha. Sorry for being so defensive - I have just seen a lot of people get jumped on for using pocket holes on this site, and a lot of us don't have the experience we would like to have. Being relatively new to this craft, I will openly admit I have a lot to learn. I understand your irritation. Woodworking is something I am definitely trying to soak up and there is a lot to learn. I get more excited with every bit of info I pick up. I appreciate the clarification on your end.

I am totally open to other forms of joinery. What method would you suggest for that situation? It was a really heavy mirror. I would love to get some nice bits for my router (tongue and groove is in my sights) but it's not financially doable right now. In the meantime, what are some methods you think I should start working on?

Thanks for the input.
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post #16 of 18 Old 02-23-2012, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYandSIMPLIFY View Post
Gotcha. Sorry for being so defensive - I have just seen a lot of people get jumped on for using pocket holes on this site, and a lot of us don't have the experience we would like to have. Being relatively new to this craft, I will openly admit I have a lot to learn. I understand your irritation. Woodworking is something I am definitely trying to soak up and there is a lot to learn. I get more excited with every bit of info I pick up. I appreciate the clarification on your end.

I am totally open to other forms of joinery. What method would you suggest for that situation? It was a really heavy mirror. I would love to get some nice bits for my router (tongue and groove is in my sights) but it's not financially doable right now. In the meantime, what are some methods you think I should start working on?

Thanks for the input.
Like I said before, you did fine till you got to the pocket screws. Using pockets in this application actually gave you a weaker joint. Given the materials and requisites of your project, the stiles would need to have been cut 5" longer to allow half lap glued joints. That would have given you 6.25 square inches of glue area on each corner. Using the pocket screws gave you 1-7/8 square inch glue area plus a couple of screws into plywood.
Just a suggestion on router bits, tongue and grooves are nice to have but low usage item. Most used would be straight and roundovers. If just starting, I'd suggest a small set, 30 or so, that would have the basics plus a few profile that you can experiment with. Building a router table would be a good starting project also.

John

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post #17 of 18 Old 02-26-2012, 07:58 AM
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Since there is not enough meat on the molding to rabbet, how about adding wood to the back.
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post #18 of 18 Old 02-26-2012, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYandSIMPLIFY View Post
..... I have just seen a lot of people get jumped on for using pocket holes on this site.....
You ain't seen nothing yet. Wait until you mention that you use biscuts sometimes.
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