round holes required for vents - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 39 Old 06-21-2013, 11:11 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 46
View gowings's Photo Album My Photos
Yea and 37.00 shipping. I checked it out. Thanks for the link
gowings is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 39 Old 06-21-2013, 11:15 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,990
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
whacu talkin' 'bout Willis?

$37.00 for shipping? HUH?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Black-Decker...item4ced995129
Item condition:
New
Quantity:
101 available / 70 sold
Price:
US $8.00 +$7.00 shipping

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #23 of 39 Old 06-22-2013, 01:04 AM
Senior Member
 
jharris2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,339
View jharris2's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings
Voila!

PS. The T-jig is still a viable option when using a hole saw as Bill suggests.

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did ó in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
jharris2 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 39 Old 06-22-2013, 08:20 AM
Senior Member
 
Sleeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Casa Grande, AZ
Posts: 5,395
View Sleeper's Photo Album My Photos
I canít even believe anybody would even consider a jigsaw for that many holes Wow.
The hole saw is the only way to go. I have cut thousands of holes with a hole saw and wouldnít do it any other way. Making a jig is a must especially if you not skilled with that size of hole. The saw can wobble if you donít have a good hold of it.

JohnnyB
Iím a die hard DIY guy. Donít tell me to hire someone for what I can do myself.
Sleeper is offline  
post #25 of 39 Old 06-22-2013, 11:54 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 46
View gowings's Photo Album My Photos
I will either use the hole saw or my router with collar sleeve and straight bit. T Jig is definitely the way to go. My experiences with the hole saw in the past is I usually get 4 or 5 holes at 1.5" deep in spruce and the teeth are getting dull.
gowings is offline  
post #26 of 39 Old 06-22-2013, 12:18 PM
Senior Member
 
Sleeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Casa Grande, AZ
Posts: 5,395
View Sleeper's Photo Album My Photos
They do wear out especially the cheaper ones. I have a box full of worn down hole saws that I keep for those nasty holes or holes where I suspect nails. I also use the used ones for gypsum board. Iíve used a lot of different brands from B&D to Skil and Milwaukee, but lately Iíve been using Lennox because they seem to last a little longer. I started out using Milwaukee on Cedar Logs and the cedar would eat them up, so the material deepens on how long they will last. I just figured the cost of hole saws per job and didnít depend on them to last long.

JohnnyB
Iím a die hard DIY guy. Donít tell me to hire someone for what I can do myself.
Sleeper is offline  
post #27 of 39 Old 06-22-2013, 09:27 PM
Senior Member
 
jharris2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,339
View jharris2's Photo Album My Photos
Or you can adhere old sanding belts to them, and use them in your drill press as sanding drums.

:)

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did ó in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
jharris2 is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to jharris2 For This Useful Post:
Sleeper (06-22-2013), thegrgyle (06-24-2013)
post #28 of 39 Old 06-22-2013, 09:28 PM
Senior Member
 
Sleeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Casa Grande, AZ
Posts: 5,395
View Sleeper's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by jharris2 View Post
Or you can adhere old sanding belts to them, and use them in your drill press as sanding drums.

:)
Umm, I like it

JohnnyB
Iím a die hard DIY guy. Donít tell me to hire someone for what I can do myself.
Sleeper is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Sleeper For This Useful Post:
jharris2 (06-22-2013)
post #29 of 39 Old 06-22-2013, 09:41 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,990
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
two things will dull a saw

Quote:
Originally Posted by gowings View Post
I will either use the hole saw or my router with collar sleeve and straight bit. T Jig is definitely the way to go. My experiences with the hole saw in the past is I usually get 4 or 5 holes at 1.5" deep in spruce and the teeth are getting dull.
Heat and abrasives. You could try cooling the saw with a water gun or spray bottle as you pull it our to clear the chips. Don't think you can power through a 1 1/2" board in one pass.

The cedar may have some abrasive quality to it, but usually around any knots. I sided my entire house, shop and garage in Cedar, so I've cut my share of it without dulling my saw blades to any extent.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #30 of 39 Old 06-23-2013, 12:33 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 46
View gowings's Photo Album My Photos
Remember, this is not cedar. This is Maple plywood.
gowings is offline  
post #31 of 39 Old 06-23-2013, 10:26 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 970
View mics_54's Photo Album My Photos
hole saw
mics_54 is offline  
post #32 of 39 Old 06-25-2013, 03:36 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 569
View Smith Brother's Photo Album My Photos
Be CAREFUL using a drill press as a drum sander. It is easier than you think to bend the arbor shaft, and then you don't have a GOOD DRILL PRESS..

I did that many many years ago, and believe me it can happen. If you do us it for anything that requires side pressure, be sure and NOT put to much pressure on such.

Dale in Indy
Smith Brother is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Smith Brother For This Useful Post:
jharris2 (06-25-2013), Sleeper (06-25-2013)
post #33 of 39 Old 06-26-2013, 07:37 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 970
View mics_54's Photo Album My Photos
Holesaws clog with sawdust quickly with no route of escape for the cuttings. Clean the cuttings out every few seconds and the saw will cut much better and reduce heat.
mics_54 is offline  
post #34 of 39 Old 06-26-2013, 09:07 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 46
View gowings's Photo Album My Photos
You got that right. I just finished cutting 21- 4 3/4" holes in 3/4" mdf. Painfully slow on the drill press. Man that new bit was smoking by the time I hit 15.
gowings is offline  
post #35 of 39 Old 06-26-2013, 09:50 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 569
View Smith Brother's Photo Album My Photos
Did you apply very LITTLE pressure, and back off OFTEN? Need to let the bit work, and keep it cool, IMO. Also if teeth get clogged, then hit gently to knock dust off.

Glad you are finished.

Dale in Indy
Smith Brother is offline  
post #36 of 39 Old 06-26-2013, 10:18 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 46
View gowings's Photo Album My Photos
Very little, in fact I could read the writing on the bit as it was turning at times. This is only part 1, now I have to router out 1 1/4" deep holes 4.75" wide, out of stationary plywood benches.
gowings is offline  
post #37 of 39 Old 07-04-2013, 01:53 AM
Senior Member
 
against_the_grain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 303
View against_the_grain's Photo Album My Photos
I would not attempt this cut with a hole saw bit. The router idea with the template is probably the way to go.

If you have a spiral saw or Rotozip with a circle cutting jig . They do well for circles with the jig.But not sure these would be capable of cutting through that thickness. Probably not.
against_the_grain is offline  
post #38 of 39 Old 07-11-2013, 06:38 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 46
View gowings's Photo Album My Photos
Final pics

Thought I'd post the outcome.
I used a flush trim bit with a sleeve collar in a Porta Cable plunge router.
All that's left is to silicone in, the vents
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Vents.jpg
Views:	122
Size:	31.3 KB
ID:	75105  

gowings is offline  
post #39 of 39 Old 07-11-2013, 07:00 PM
Senior Member
 
jharris2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,339
View jharris2's Photo Album My Photos
Nice work! Thanks for the update.

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did ó in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
jharris2 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Flush Hardwood Floor Vents TS3660 Project Showcase 14 03-14-2019 09:33 AM
Round holes in square pegs Scribbler Woodturning 4 12-22-2010 11:03 PM
round sanding pad holes mismatch adauria Power Tools & Machinery 2 12-13-2009 07:54 AM
Custom Soffit vents, what tools do I need? nowwhatnapster Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 11 12-28-2008 01:14 AM
Heating duct vents turgem Joinery 2 10-13-2008 10:52 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome