Rookie Question - Window Trim - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 04-27-2020, 02:38 PM Thread Starter
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Question Rookie Question - Window Trim

Hi all,

I am looking for some help and/or guidance as I am running into an issue outside of my limited knowledge. Let me start by saying that the work I am doing is at a cottage, so while I am trying as hard as I can to have everything look 'nice' and pleasing, it does not need perfection (as what is already done before I bought it certainly sets the bar well below that level).

As part of our renovation work we put in new windows and last fall before I closed the place up for winter I started putting the trim around the windows. My issue is that the trim doesn't sit flush against the wall, so when I put it up and made sure the miters looked good, now there are visible gaps between the wall and the trim on the outside edges. If I push the edges to close the gap it just opens more noticeable gaps at the miters instead.

What are my best options here? If I was painting I would probably just put some filler in there but we are going to stain so I'm not sure how noticeable it would be if we tried to find a pine-colored filler? I'm kind of stuck with decision paralysis and worried that if I do try to use filler it might end up looking worse than if I just left the gaps. I attached two photos to show an example of what I mean (one of them is sideways for some reason when I upload it here).

Thanks in advance!
Chris
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post #2 of 6 Old 04-27-2020, 04:54 PM
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At the edge of the trim that is against the window jamb, run a rabbet the same depth as the gap at the wall. That way the trim will sit flush to the window jamb and the wall. You can use a table saw or a rabbetting bit in a router.
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post #3 of 6 Old 04-28-2020, 09:36 AM
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When I installed my first UPC frame, I found the brick work was very uneven. Also there were a few sizeable gaps. I taped up to stop the foam coming into the kitchen and filled the gaps with builders foam. Worked well.
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post #4 of 6 Old 04-28-2020, 10:40 AM
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One uncompromising, old school method is a back band trim. This is a small wood piece hollowed out to a thin "L" profile that sits over the back edge of the flat trim with a rabbet deep enough to cover the widest gap between the trim and wall. It is cut to a mitered surround for the flat trim, and its thin back edge is then hand planed to conform to the varying distance from the face of the flat trim back to the wall. It looks so good on the face of the trim that many people don't realize it is there to hide gaps at the edge.

You have to find or make the trim piece. You need to have some skill with a hand plane. The first window will go slow. This isn't for everyone, but I'll pass it on for your consideration.
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post #5 of 6 Old 04-29-2020, 10:15 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks all for the ideas so far. John I tried searching a bit to see an example of what the back band would look like when done - to make sure I'm looking at the right approach, it basically looks like a second layer of slim trim around the existing? Thanks!
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post #6 of 6 Old 04-29-2020, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom-G View Post
At the edge of the trim that is against the window jamb, run a rabbet the same depth as the gap at the wall. That way the trim will sit flush to the window jamb and the wall. You can use a table saw or a rabbetting bit in a router.

I would try this first on one set of trim and it should work as described. It was my initial thought as well.
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