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post #1 of 14 Old 05-21-2008, 09:56 PM Thread Starter
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Resource question

Hello everyone, i'm a noob here and you guys have answered questions in another thread for me about nail guns..

I want to trim out my windows, right now they have the bottom piece that's a lame like almost plastic piece but nothing else.. They are the type where the window like sits in the wall (as opposed to flush with the walls).. Anyways, i'm going to buy an 18ga and 16ga nailers to use.. Can anyone recommend a good book or online resource?

Obviously I"m willing to spend money on books, etc.. Seems a lot of the books I look at are like trim idea books, etc and don't really go into details on installing.. or they like are missing steps that even I know of...

Thanks again, in advance..

Brad
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post #2 of 14 Old 05-21-2008, 10:29 PM
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trim book

I bought a book from Home Depot called
"Trimwork 1-2-3"
Expert Advice from the home depot.
Create style with architectural details.

It has a lot of directions on all types of trim work. I Like it. $24.95, But you can also go to WWW.Amizon.com and may find it cheeper. There are a few other web sites out there to buy books from, but this is the one I have bought many books from.

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post #3 of 14 Old 05-22-2008, 07:52 AM Thread Starter
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Cool.. You know what's funny, yesterday was at home depot and looked at that book, and the stanley one. I was there picking up painting supplies and well, like all of us, I have a way of thinking, "while i'm here"... I think it was like 18 bucks, which isn't bad considering I wouldn't have to order it, etc.. I might to pick that up..

Thanks for the info.

I need to take some pics of the stuff I have done so you guys can see and have an idea of my skill level when I post questions..
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post #4 of 14 Old 05-22-2008, 07:55 AM
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Brad, I think using the books is a great idea. The one thing the books sometimes don't explain is how to deal with small obstacles that can leave you frustrated, like differing surface areas when trying to apply trim as flat as possible. A common problem is door and window jambs that extend out farther than the sheetrock or plaster, or the reverse which is common for those of us that trim newer openings, where the sheetrock sticks out beyond the edge of the jambs. These are small problems that can be remedied fairly easy. It is also a good idea to always take the time to scribe or notch moldings for tight clean fits.
Scraping away old caulk is important after removing old trim, and sometimes you have to break out the trusty block plane to lower high spots on the jambs I mentioned.

Yesterday I spent nearly 20min trying to scribe and notch an eight inch long piece of baseboard to fit between the end of a baseboard heating element and a short section of wall. I needed to notch cleanly around the copper pipe and sit the base and a very buckled harwood floor all confined to a space barely big enough to get one hand into, and not to mention the tip of a nailgun. Construction adhesive to the rescue.

My point is, take your time with the little details, (some that are not in the book) it's the difference between a professional looking job, and a homeowner job. There's a handful of ways and steps to applying trim, the author of these books shows you what works for them, there is not a written in stone standard. But most of us take the same path, just some of us walk on the left, and some on the right.

It sounds like you're windows do not have casing trim around them? And the sheetrock wraps around from the wall in towards the window? I had a few sheetrocked openings in my house when I bought it and dressed them out pretty nice with little hassle and a big reward...oh yeah, the wife was happy too.

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post #5 of 14 Old 05-22-2008, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
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joesdad, thank for the input.. yeah, i realize that things will be out of wack, etc.. I just like to start with the generic game plan doing things properly, etc.. I will take a pic of one my windows, but I think we are talking about the same setup..

Yeah, completely know what you mean with taking your time.. I hate it when I look at someone's painting for example and you can see where they hit baseboards and the lines aren't nice and clean.. I'm not a professionaly painter, but i've had people tell me my painting looked professional.. but It takes me days to get things done that most people do in like a day or less hahah.. My wife has a word for this involving the rear... about how detail oriented I am.. being a diy'er.. I'm not affraid to restart something haha if I figure out where I went wrong haha..

Thanks again for the responses, I'll post a pic of one of the windows..
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post #6 of 14 Old 05-22-2008, 10:22 PM Thread Starter
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Yeah, take a look at these windows.. Pathetic.. Just a little piece of some sort of composite I am guessing.. I think the house would look way better with them trimmed out..


The like tan color is a bathroom I just painted and yes, the minblinds will be on the way out the door.. and the blue above is the worst painting mistake I have ever made.. it's horrible haha..

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post #7 of 14 Old 05-22-2008, 10:54 PM
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yeah! they're the ones. Those should dress up nicely. The outside edge where the corner bead is on the windows usually have a wicked wave to it, unless they fastened it nice without any buckles in it. Can't wait to see the after pics...

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post #8 of 14 Old 06-03-2008, 10:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by autoBrad View Post
Yeah, take a look at these windows.. Pathetic.. Just a little piece of some sort of composite I am guessing.. I think the house would look way better with them trimmed out..


The like tan color is a bathroom I just painted and yes, the minblinds will be on the way out the door.. and the blue above is the worst painting mistake I have ever made.. it's horrible haha..

Trimming out these windows will look nice. You might consider adding a stool and apron at the bottom of your windows. In case you don't understand these terms or you haven't bought the book yet, a stool is like a shelf that projects horizontily from the window casing slightly into the room and extends to both sides underneath the side trim. You will have to be careful notching it to fit snugly to the wall and window casing (at least close enough for caulking if you are painting the trim). And the apron is another piece of trim that is attached underneath the stool. The sides can be cut at a variety of angles and returned against the wall. Some people prefer mitering all four corners which is also a very nice look. Good luck and I hope you enjoy your project!

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post #9 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 07:27 AM Thread Starter
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goingenoan, thanks for the reply.. Yeah, I plan on putting in a new stool and adding an apron. I bought the home depot book and hand another one I didn't realize had some info in it.. I think i'm going to buy 1x4 pine for the inside top and sides and 1x6 pine for the stool. I haven't been able to find casing that matched what my house has around the windows exactly yet.. I think i'm going to have to go with something just close... I removed the stool in that tan room but popped it back in temporarily. I need to buy a router to put an edge on the stool... Any recommendations for what type of router bit to use?? If I should just round over the edge or what? I am hoping to wait a month and have some money to buy a router.. I have a jigsaw which I think i'll use to cut the stool and maybe use that to rip the 1x4's for the sides..

Thanks Again

Brad
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post #10 of 14 Old 09-11-2008, 08:18 PM Thread Starter
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Update.. With Pics.. questions also haha

Here's a couple pics of how the first window ended up...


Obviously one is unprimed, the other pic is after two coats of primer with sanding in between... Which brings up my next question.. The trim is pine the 1x material for the sill and insides is poplar.. So far I have been using kilz premium primer(had it already).. But it seems that it's tacky, almost like it never dries, even like a month later that one window is tacky.. like those wood blind slats I had sitting in there for color.. were sticking to the sill... Is this uncommon?? What's the best thing to use for priming and painting trim like this??

Thanks again ..
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post #11 of 14 Old 09-11-2008, 10:39 PM
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What a difference a little trim makes Huh? Great job and it looks very nice!

John
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post #12 of 14 Old 09-19-2008, 09:33 PM
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Huge improvement, Brad. Looks good.
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post #13 of 14 Old 01-06-2009, 05:24 PM
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Yeah, it wouldn't seem right that the primer would be tacky that long after being primed. Paint, on the other hand, takes a while to cure. Latex and oil both need a month or so to cure before you can set anything on them. Is it oil based or latex paint?
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post #14 of 14 Old 01-06-2009, 05:25 PM
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Oh, and P.S. - those windows are looking 100% better with the trim!
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