Radius Fluted Casing - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 02-12-2007, 11:29 PM Thread Starter
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Radius Fluted Casing

I've attatched a rough sketch of a piece I'm about to build. I have to build 4 of these. The customer wants a radiused fluted casing at the top. I was planning on making the pieces by using a swing arm router jig, and plunge cutting the flutes. Was "building it in my head", and thought I'd throw it out here and see, if you fine folks had any other methods or suggestions.

Regards, BULL
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Last edited by BULLHART; 02-12-2007 at 11:29 PM. Reason: typos as usual
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post #2 of 19 Old 02-13-2007, 12:51 PM
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Bullhart; looks great to me, only thing you might wanna think about is using plinth blocks at floor instead of trim all the way down. It makes for a nicer transition to the baseboard. IMHO
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post #3 of 19 Old 02-13-2007, 03:44 PM
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I like the swing arm idea what are you using for material?
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post #4 of 19 Old 02-13-2007, 04:48 PM
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I would make a template with the angle of the arched peices and secure it to a router table, then take the peice you want fluted and align the router fence to the depth needed for each flute and then push the peice through, following the angled template.

The templet gets anchored on the left side of the router bit and that way all you have to do is push your arch piece and it will follow the desired arch.
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post #5 of 19 Old 02-13-2007, 06:34 PM Thread Starter
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Kirk, interesting idea, I may have to run a practice on that one. I do something quite similar only standing up, on my miter saw when angle cutting curved handrail pieces.

TexT, This is a painted project, so I will use a mixture of Birch PW and Poplar. The shelves are glass with internal lighting in the top.

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post #6 of 19 Old 02-13-2007, 07:00 PM
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The only time consuming part is making the jig to match your arch. Once thats done its a cake walk on a router table. I have done several arched projects that way.

The reason I like that over any other method is that the router is stationary, which means I can focus on pushing the piece through and not worry about managing the routher.
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post #7 of 19 Old 02-14-2007, 08:56 PM
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You can't make it out of medex mdf? It would be a hell of a lot easier than out of poplar, and the medex would be fine even if they left a window open during a thunder storm.

Personally, I would swing the router rather than push the stock on a router table.
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post #8 of 19 Old 02-15-2007, 02:02 AM
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I agree a simple router mounted to a an adjustable swing arm is the way to go. At least for myself it is, the set up time is minimal and chance for error is less. When using a router table everything has to be set up just right and if any of your feather board's or clamps move the slightest amount the piece is ruined. Making a jig for the router table takes time and careful set up and if you have to run multiple pieces is the better way accomplishing this. For the small amount your doing I think the old router on a stick is the way to go, just my two sense though.
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post #9 of 19 Old 02-15-2007, 06:50 PM
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Here is a video of a router on a stick cutting an ellipse. Even with a real primitive setup as shown, it is very precise, stable and quick and easy to change pivot points. You need a high speed connection though.

http://www.miterclamp.com/videos/Cutting_ellipse.wmv

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Jimc
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post #10 of 19 Old 02-16-2007, 08:02 AM
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Bull,

I am a big fan of jigs where they make sense - where they are expedient - but this is a no-brainer. Use the swing arm. You'll be done with 10 of them before you can even make the jig.

Clampman this video is awesome. Do you have more tricks up your sleeve you'd like to share?
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post #11 of 19 Old 02-16-2007, 11:54 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks all for the input.
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post #12 of 19 Old 02-16-2007, 08:29 PM
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Texas,

Thank you. Here's a link to my index of videos that I just started getting rolling then dropped my camera and broke it.

http://www.miterclamp.com/Woodworking_video_index.htm

But there are ten of them up there including that one you saw - only one of them is a propaganda video, but that is stated where the link is so you don't get fooled into clicking on it. Again, all the videos require high speed connections.

There is also an article on making bent raised panel doors with a whole lot of pics which is pretty good since it shows each stage of fabrication, and the sequence of assembly on the job. The articles of course do not require high speed connections.

This link will take you to a page which has several links to articles on my website. Run your mouse over the pics, and you will get a synopsis of each article.

http://www.miterclamp.com/productiontechnique.html

Have a good weekend all.

Regards,
Jimc
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post #13 of 19 Old 02-16-2007, 08:58 PM
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I can't do it tonight but I am going to go through all of it thoroughly. Making curved panel doors like that is not something I have done yet. I showed the wife and we want to find a place for them in our house. Have a good weekend yourself.
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post #14 of 19 Old 02-17-2007, 09:23 AM
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"To save on material the backs were v-matched groove and groove with splines rather than tounge and goove."

I never even thought of this; I have some funky walnut I need to stretch as far as I can this is a great tip. I guess you slip the spliine into one board, fasten it, then slip the other baord over it. Works just like a T & G but saves the width of the stock you'd remove plus all the waste, to make a tongue.
Hey guys, this is just one of dozens of valuable tips you'll get if you glean Jim's link.


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post #15 of 19 Old 06-07-2007, 11:30 AM Thread Starter
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Finally got to this project on the list. As I thought the swing arm worked great. It was so fast and consistent, that I am sure it was the right method. The other ideas were interesting though, and I have added them to the memory banks for other situations...thanks

Still a work in progress, I'm making the doors today
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post #16 of 19 Old 06-07-2007, 11:50 AM
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Nice work. That swing arm is da cat's meow ain't it!
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post #17 of 19 Old 06-07-2007, 09:02 PM Thread Starter
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sure is, thanks for the compliment
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post #18 of 19 Old 06-07-2007, 09:19 PM
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Would cutting complete fluted discs and then splitting out the sections have provided an easier route? Are you adding a keystone at the top or plinth blocks at the bottom?
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post #19 of 19 Old 06-08-2007, 06:04 AM Thread Starter
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I dont see where making a full circle would be much benefit. I liked having the tails long because I installed them with the extra material. I then clamped a straight edge level and cut all of the tails in place. I had one hell of a lumpy floor to work on, and this helped me to get a nice level eyeline.

Keystones yes

Plinth blocks on the bottom, no. The customer doesn't want them.

wadda' ya gonna do? lol
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