putting up trim - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 08-11-2011, 09:56 PM Thread Starter
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putting up trim

OK since I just got a air compressor my dad wants me to put up some trim in his office. First thing that I was wondering is the walls are at a angle and I am unsure on how to find out what the angle is . Any recommendations for an angle finder. Other thing I was wondering was should I use my 18 gauge brad or 15 gauge angle finish nailer.
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post #2 of 19 Old 08-11-2011, 11:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Woodworkingkid View Post
OK since I just got a air compressor my dad wants me to put up some trim in his office. First thing that I was wondering is the walls are at a angle and I am unsure on how to find out what the angle is . Any recommendations for an angle finder. Other thing I was wondering was should I use my 18 gauge brad or 15 gauge angle finish nailer.

Hi kid - there are all kinds of ways to find angles, probably the most fun is this one though:
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...angle%20finder

There are mechanical ones around cheaper also.

Unless you are hanging some seriously heavy trim, I would opt for the 18 gauge. If you have both, use 'em. 15 guage along the thicker edge and 18 along the thinner. Really though 18 should be plenty, I like using 1-1/2 to 2" nails and a lot of 18 guage quit at 1-1/4.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
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post #3 of 19 Old 08-12-2011, 05:46 PM Thread Starter
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thanks
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post #4 of 19 Old 08-12-2011, 09:24 PM
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The easiest might be to use a Stanley 30 gauge.
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post #5 of 19 Old 08-13-2011, 05:58 AM
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I use an adjustable plastic drafting protractor. It's under $10 the last time I bought one. For trim work I use 18 ga. That's plenty.








.
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post #6 of 19 Old 08-18-2011, 09:35 PM
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what?!

You guys acually put up casing and baseboard with a brad nailer? Thats nuts....maybe using brads into the jamb but definitely finish nails into the walls.

jraks
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post #7 of 19 Old 08-19-2011, 12:25 PM
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i don't think the 18ga has the holding strength. try this: nail a piece up with 18 ga and try to pull it off... 15 ga except where it may split on a thin casing edge. jmo
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post #8 of 19 Old 08-21-2011, 08:17 PM
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Nobody use a Sliding T-Bevel any more??? Geez...I must be a dinosaur.....all them new fancy gadgets!
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post #9 of 19 Old 08-21-2011, 08:29 PM
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Nobody use a Sliding T-Bevel any more??? Geez...I must be a dinosaur.....all them new fancy gadgets!
They are fine for reproducing an angle, but it won't tell you what the angle is.








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post #10 of 19 Old 08-27-2011, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
They are fine for reproducing an angle, but it won't tell you what the angle is.








Until today that is
http://www.generaltools.com/828--DIGITAL-SLIDING-T-BEVEL_p_1514.html?referer=mailid:5
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John

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post #11 of 19 Old 08-27-2011, 10:19 AM
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I use one of these


http://www.amazon.com/iGaging-14-Digital-Protractor-Rule/dp/B002PX6LUS/ref=pd_cp_hi_pw_4
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post #12 of 19 Old 08-27-2011, 10:21 AM
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Now that looks useful----I think I'll tract that down and try it!
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post #13 of 19 Old 08-28-2011, 06:14 PM
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They are fine for reproducing an angle, but it won't tell you what the angle is.






.
Hold the cassing in place and mark. Do this on both side jambs and the head jamb. Now you can use the sliding bevel to determine the angle.
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post #14 of 19 Old 08-28-2011, 07:45 PM
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That must be one of the newfangled sliding T bevels with a digital readout. Actually, I have my doubts about stuff like that when it's battery operated...you never know when they are dieing, or worse yet, going dead. Like the time I was running cable in my crawl space of my roof, and about halfway across the house, the battery in my flashlight goes dead. Now, this wouldn't be that bad, but it was in July, and it was dark and hotter than heck.

To top it off, I had a lineman's pliers in my back pocket, that happened to get caught on a roof truss. I was in a section of space where the roof pitched down...it was a tight area. I couldn't go anywhere and was stuck pretty good. Couldn't get an arm behind me. It was late in the afternoon, and I was thinking that I might be stuck there all night. I considered yelling out for help, but that might prove embarrassing.

Its amazing how slippery one gets when sweating profusely. I managed to work my hand around to free up the pliers, and eventually made it to the scuttle. Had to replace the battery in the flashlight.








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post #15 of 19 Old 09-07-2011, 11:37 PM
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I hear you... Sounds like as much fun as crawling in an attic in the summer where there is 60 year old "paper" insulation covered by blown in insulation. I was working on my daughters house rerouting some cable for the network/cable TV. In this case the batteries were OK but the flashlight was being pushed beyond all reasonable boundaries for service length (I am a New Englander and we are notoriously thrifty). The access panel to the attic was so small you had to turn "sideways" and have your shoulders come up in the "corners" of the hole. Nothing like dealing with walking on rafters in the dark....

Chris
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post #16 of 19 Old 09-11-2011, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
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hey thanks for the help i think i am going to put up the trim next weekend
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post #17 of 19 Old 10-01-2011, 12:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
They are fine for reproducing an angle, but it won't tell you what the angle is.








.
A sliding T-bevel and a speed square. Transfer the angle from the bevel square onto the straight edge of a piece of scrap material then use the speed square to determine the angle and divide that in half to arrive at the miter degree. No batteries, no confusion. Simple. I do it all the time. Also, @Kid, it has been my experience that usually all angles are general. 22.5, 45, 90. Sometimes I run into 30 degree but 90% of the time, the industry keeps to the standards. Also, I find that cutting a 1/16 to 1/32 long (depending on length, longer pieces upwards of 1/8) then flexing the material into place produces the desired result. In addition, if I am installing baseboard on a 90 degree wall, I will usually cut my miters at 44 degrees then press them into place as I nail. Casing can be tricky to produce perfect looking miters. Depending on a variety of things. Width of jam, imperfections in the sheetrock, properly hung doors and windows. I often find myself cutting compound miters depending on the placement of the window or door in relation to the wall.

Last edited by Trimguy; 10-01-2011 at 12:34 PM.
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post #18 of 19 Old 10-01-2011, 12:55 PM
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A sliding T-bevel and a speed square. Transfer the angle from the bevel square onto the straight edge of a piece of scrap material then use the speed square to determine the angle and divide that in half to arrive at the miter degree.

I've done it that way too. I still think an adjustable protractor is faster.








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post #19 of 19 Old 10-01-2011, 02:20 PM
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Certainly. If you have one on hand. I have also manufactured temporary templates out of strips of scrap material to achieve the same effect. Works in a pinch when you are out on a job and discover your kids were playing with your tools and now some of them are missing when you need them. How to handle THAT? Well... thats another post all together. :)

PS.... thanks for the "welcome." :)

"No matter how many times I cut it, I am STILL too short!"
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