Pressure door closure - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 02-08-2019, 11:16 AM Thread Starter
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Pressure door closure

I recently purchased a newer house. We have a fairly large amount of wood work. There are double doors to the home office and master bedroom with pressure closures in the top. These are the closures that sit in a hole bored into the door frame, a metal sleeve inserted then a spring inside that, a ball bearing on top and a second sleeve screwed into the first. Adjustments made by how far the second is screwed down into the first. My problem is this, one of the doors had the hole bored too deep. The first sleeve sits too low in the hole and the second sleeve engages too low. Thus, the ball bearing does not put pressure on the plate in the frame. (I've attached pictures) How can I get that first sleeve out so I can put a stop underneath and raise it up to be functional? I'm stuck.
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post #2 of 8 Old 02-08-2019, 11:22 AM
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Grab ahold of the threaded keeper with some needle nose pliers and pull?
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post #3 of 8 Old 02-08-2019, 11:43 AM
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I don't know what the thread count is on the female part, but you may be able to find a pipe nipple in the plumbing department to thread into the part in the door and pull it out.

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post #4 of 8 Old 02-08-2019, 11:50 AM
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You could probably use a hole saw to remove the current. Then glue in a plug to fit the hole and drill new hole correct size.


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post #5 of 8 Old 02-08-2019, 12:01 PM
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If you can find a bolt that matches the thread in the sleeve in the door, you may be able to pull on the bolt to remove the sleeve. A quick search for closet door ball catch...indicates many styles are available as replacements...in case you just tear it out.

or replace with a new one next to it and abandon the useless one.

Gary

Woodworking is like wetting myself....Only I know that warm feeling!

Last edited by gmercer_48083; 02-08-2019 at 12:04 PM.
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post #6 of 8 Old 02-08-2019, 12:52 PM
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post #7 of 8 Old 02-08-2019, 02:59 PM
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Clean the inside sleeve with denatured alcohol, get some jbweld or epoxy designed to adhere to brass and a cheap hex bolt. Use your adhesive of choice to fasten the hex bolt into the sleeve and it'll be solid enough to remove the sleeve. Just dont go crazy with the adhesive...
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post #8 of 8 Old 02-09-2019, 11:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Echo415 View Post
Clean the inside sleeve with denatured alcohol, get some jbweld or epoxy designed to adhere to brass and a cheap hex bolt. Use your adhesive of choice to fasten the hex bolt into the sleeve and it'll be solid enough to remove the sleeve. Just dont go crazy with the adhesive...
I don't like working with epoxy unless I have no other choice, but this idea gave me a related idea that would work with materials I have on hand: Make a simple "jam chuck" and pull it out:

REQUIRED PARTS and TOOLS:
* Short piece of dowel, slightly smaller than the inside diameter of the sleeve. You could use a hole saw to make one. You could also use square stock, but it may not grip as well.
* Long bolt.
* Two nuts to fit the bolt. I am calling them Nut A and Nut B. See the drawing in the attachment.
* Three washers.
* Scrapwood board
* Drill - Much larger than threaded part of the bolt, to make a very loose fit. Must be smaller than the bolt head.
* Saw - Any saw will do.
* Clamp or jig to hold the dowel while sawing a diagonal cut across it.

INSTRUCTIONS:
* Drill a hole down the center of the dowel.
* Drill a hole in the middle of the board.
* Make an acute diagonal cut across the dowel.
* Insert the bolt with a washer. The bolt will go from the bottom of the dowel, through both halves.
* Add Nut A and a washer to the top of the dowel.
* Insert the assembly, bolt head down, into the metal threaded sleeve in the wood.
* Tighten Nut A on top of the assembly. The diagonal faces will expand the assembly against the walls of the metal threaded sleeve.
* Place the board so that the threaded part of the bolt goes through the hole in the board.
* Thread Nut B and a washer on top of the board.
* Tighten Nut B slowly. The assembly should pull the sleeve out of the wood. If not, tighten Nut A and try again. You may need some scrap boards or blocks to raise the sides of the "lifting board" as you pull the insert.

CAVEATS:
* The drill hole should be larger than usual, but not so large that the bolt head pulls through the wood. Keep in mind that the drill hole will offset as you tighten Nut A.
* Think about how you will tighten Nut A in the assembly. It may be tricky, because it will be down in the hole slightly. I doubt it will be much of a problem.
* I imagine that the insert threads will provide plenty of grip against the jam chuck, but you may have to experiment to find the least tightness that provides sufficient grip. If you have real grip issues, glue sandpaper around the dowel parts and try again.
* Don't over-tighten the assembly so much that you crack the insert or prevent it from coming out.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Sleeve Remover Design.pdf (42.3 KB, 24 views)
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Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 02-09-2019 at 11:19 AM.
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