Outlet extender in built-in - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 04-24-2012, 11:26 AM Thread Starter
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Outlet extender in built-in

I need some advice on how to handle the outlets in this new built in I just finished. I realize the cutouts are not nearly done very well (this is what happens when you put your brother in charge of something, haha), but i can't be the first with this problem. How do I extend the outlet out and cover it up with a faceplate and clean this up? I got an extender but it was crap and didn't extend out far enough. The backing is 1/4" thick and in a couple spots it isn't flush with the wall, so I need to bring this out a good amount and then maybe figure out a way to do a wider faceplate or something to cover up the cutout??

Thanks!
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post #2 of 11 Old 04-24-2012, 12:41 PM
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Washers ?

I had a similar issue as yours but not as thick as that ply in your picture. I bought a package of small flat washers and inserted them in between the ears of the outlet and the box. I was able to extend the outlet enough so that the plate fit nicely.

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post #3 of 11 Old 04-24-2012, 12:58 PM
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Just use longer screws

Washers are optional, but some fiddling will be required to get it at the right depth. A Jumbo face plate will solve the problem and when it's installed and the outlet will snug up to the back of it:
http://www.kyledesigns.com/product/S...r-2-Plugs.html

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #4 of 11 Old 04-24-2012, 03:22 PM
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The proper way to do that and be safe and up to code is to use an outlet extension. They are available in different sizes. I don't know how you plan to finish out the wall. I would cut a piece of plywood to fill in where the hole was cut oversized and thoroughly glue it in and bondo the seam. Then install the extension. If you are just going to paint, eventually the seam will show. It might be best in the long run to pull the plywood off and make another.
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post #5 of 11 Old 04-24-2012, 03:33 PM
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You can build your own custom cover for it. Get a thin piece of wood from a craft store, i'm thinking 1/8" or less, trace the cutouts and screw locations with an outlet cover, carefully trim it out, countersink the screw holes, sand down the edges to a beveled/curved edge, and I would just paint it unless if you found a nice wood
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post #6 of 11 Old 04-25-2012, 12:24 PM
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my recollection of code application here is: any gap has to be less than 1/4", and no metal washers as shims. 3/16" ply will meet the 1/4" requirement. you need to extend the receptacle out with receptacle spacers found in the electrical section. they can be snapped together for different thickness needs. i think i would still fill in with some ply strips to level out the miscut.

http://homebuilding.thefuntimesguide...et_spacers.php

Last edited by TimPa; 04-25-2012 at 12:27 PM.
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post #7 of 11 Old 05-14-2012, 10:34 PM
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Is this in a visible spot? If not I have just cut the hole large enough to reattach the faceplate flush with the wall. It is fine if it is in the back of a cabinet or something and not visible.
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post #8 of 11 Old 05-19-2012, 03:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Washers are optional, but some fiddling will be required to get it at the right depth. A Jumbo face plate will solve the problem and when it's installed and the outlet will snug up to the back of it:
http://www.kyledesigns.com/product/S...r-2-Plugs.html
Been there and done that. You don't need to extend the outlet you just need to get something under the ears. put some 1/4 inch in behind the ears and drill a hole for the screw. Then get an oversized plate. If they make one big enough.

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post #9 of 11 Old 05-19-2012, 04:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessrj View Post
Been there and done that. You don't need to extend the outlet you just need to get something under the ears. put some 1/4 inch in behind the ears and drill a hole for the screw. Then get an oversized plate. If they make one big enough.
When you do work for someone else you kinda have to go overboard with safety. According to most city building codes you can't have a avenue to flammable materials next to an outlet. As rare as it is, in the event the outlet would catch fire it could set fire to the house. So if you had a customer that had an outlet catch fire and burn their house you would be left wide open to be sued. Doing the work by the book, the outlet extension is cheap insurance.
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post #10 of 11 Old 05-19-2012, 07:44 PM
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What you need is called a "mud ring". It is metal, and attaches to the existing box and extends the outlet.





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post #11 of 11 Old 05-20-2012, 12:23 PM
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A box extender is all you need for your application. They do come in different sizes. I just bought some for some single outlets in wainscot paneling I just did. They came in a pack of 2 & the longer 6x32x1-1/2" screws were included. You can use your existing plates with them. If your cutout is to large you may have to use larger plates to cover your hole. A mud ring is installed under your finished surface & usually for new construction when you know the finished thickness of the walls. The box extender is installed over the finished surface. Good for after thicker material has been added as in your case. It will install on surface & extend past additional thickness into the box shielding the added material

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...&storeId=10051

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Last edited by jlord; 05-20-2012 at 12:30 PM.
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