Need help trimming recessed windows - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 09-21-2015, 09:39 PM Thread Starter
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Need help trimming recessed windows

Please see my photo. I'm trying to finish my garage window trim, but the current wooden window frames are recessed, or setback a bit from the studs and from the drywall that I've hung. Should I add some sort of spacer so that I can add my molding ? I haven't run into this issue before...usually the window is flush with the drywall. I've researched, but most tutorials just assume that your window is flush with the drywall. Thanks!
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post #2 of 15 Old 09-21-2015, 10:31 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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I had the same issue

My wall are 6" thick so the window frames were recesses. When I trimmed them out in Oak, I shimmed them out to flush from the studs, and used Liquid Nails to join them. I used finish nails to secure them to the studs.

Since the windows are already installed, you have to "fuss" with them to get this to look right. There are dowel centers that locate a added piece to register to the initial piece. You make the dowel holes in one the insert the center and pound the add on so it leaves a mark.

If the add on isn't flush with the surface, you'll have to plane it down or sand it flush. OR you can rabbet your trim to take up any variation....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 15 Old 09-21-2015, 11:22 PM
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Call me stupid but I don't see a problem here. Take a 2x4 and mill it on the table saw to make a filler frame.

You probably will have to adjust the measurements some, but it should end up looking sorta like brick mold.

I guess you know by now that you should have addressed this problem before hanging the drywall, right?
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post #4 of 15 Old 09-22-2015, 12:08 PM
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If I misunderstood the OP question ignore the mess below.

You don't want to pin the wind frame into the wall, you want it clear at the sides, even over stuffed insul can affect the mechanics of the window. The house moves seasonally and the lumber shrinks over time. Depending on the brand the window the interior of the jamb has a dado, ridge or plain flat spot to attach an extension jamb. Usually when ordering a window the 1st thing most lumb yd counter peeps ask is wall thickness, in general walls are 2X4 or 2X6 and the wind jambs are built for each to minimize extension jamb width. The wider the extension jamb the greater the seasonal movement and the more likely there will be separation at the casing and at the winds jamb.

That said pretty much any ext jamb can be flushed to the drywall and be direct nailed with a 2 1/2" fin nail. At most, (if no jamb dado or ridge is present) shims can be added in front of the wind jamb, (not in contact with it) to fix the ext jamb to the jack at the inner corner flush to the drywall.

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post #5 of 15 Old 09-22-2015, 02:16 PM
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Most replacement windows are drop in units with no jambs. The windows are hung plumb in the rough opening and the jambs & sill are cut and installed with the window in place. Common S4S 1x material is usually used.

The jambs can be shimmed to give the appearance of the wall squaring up to the window. They usually don't actually fit centered, square and plumb, so you do your best to make it look that way. Shoot for a 1/8" gap between the jambs and the window frame with a bead of caulk to finish it off. Sill goes in first, then top jamb, then side jambs, then casing.

I actually really like trimming out replacement windows because it's quick, pretty easy and highly gratifying.
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post #6 of 15 Old 09-22-2015, 05:52 PM
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I installed a few of those, (up to 30) back in the early oughts at a condo complex. Don't like them, at least the couple 3 brands I came across, I'd use them on a garage, barn or shed but not in my house and have gone out of my way to talk customers out of them.

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post #7 of 15 Old 09-23-2015, 07:04 AM
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The search word you are looking for is "Jamb extender"

Typically, a 3/4" thick board is ripped to extend the window jamb so that the lead edge is flush with the drywall.

A simple task when using a table saw--a bit tricky if the window is not in plane with the drywall-
When that happens ,tapered extenders must be made---
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post #8 of 15 Old 09-23-2015, 09:24 AM
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here's another method...

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeswoods View Post
The search word you are looking for is "Jamb extender"

Typically, a 3/4" thick board is ripped to extend the window jamb so that the lead edge is flush with the drywall.

A simple task when using a table saw--a bit tricky if the window is not in plane with the drywall-
When that happens ,tapered extenders must be made---
Tack your "oversize" or wider than needed, extended jambs in place, scribe the drywall line on the side. Remove and label the piece for reinstalling. Now you have an exact fit extension and if it's a parallel line you are set to rip them. If it's a taper, you may have to circ saw them OR use a taper jig depending on how long they are.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 15 Old 09-24-2015, 02:43 PM
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I take a tri-square and measure the depth all around the window (from drywall face to the window frame) needed for the jamb extension. I take the largest measurement and make all the pieces that width, assuming the window was installed fairly plumb. build a box and install it with glue and finish nails.

stool installations are different.
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post #10 of 15 Old 09-24-2015, 04:14 PM
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Mikeswoods has by far given the simplest clearest explanation of what needs to be done. A fairly simple task even if the extensions need to be tapered.

Likewise I've had jobs where the jamb sits proud of the drywall. You do the same thing but the strips go on the outside flush with the casings edge.

Neither of these scenarios/practices are ideal or acceptable if things are getting stained but for paint it's generally pretty standard.
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post #11 of 15 Old 03-27-2019, 10:46 AM
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Can I ask how you resolved this, have the same exact circumstance?
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post #12 of 15 Old 03-27-2019, 11:59 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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follow the advice above ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Willemwork View Post
Can I ask how you resolved this, have the same exact circumstance?

It means making your own extensions and whether they need to be tapered is specific to your situation. It's basic woodworking with basic tools if that's your concern. Cutting a taper on a 1 X 3 can be dangerous unless good work practices are followed. If you need more advice on doing that post back here or search online.



I searched You Tube with zero results so, I'll give you a short tip.
Use a piece of 2" foam insulation as a work surface.
Have your marked cut lines numbered as to location on the window(s)
Use a circular saw with a 40 tooth blade.
Lay the marked piece down and cut to the outside of the line either freehand, OR using a straight edge guide.


If this is above your skill level, probably best to contract it out.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #13 of 15 Old 03-27-2019, 12:13 PM
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We dealt with this in the log home we built in 1989 and lived in for 25 years before bailing out of IL due to high taxes. We ran nice pine strips as spacers flush to where was needed to put trim. The house was 2X6 with 1/2 logs outside and many places inside. Some walls were logs and we used 5/4 cedar decking ripped in 1/2 as window trim but still needed the spacer to get it out where we could butt the wall logs to it. It worked great and is still standing and very stout. Hope this helps.
post #14 of 15 Old 03-27-2019, 12:28 PM
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what you are looking for are window jamb extensions...
https://www.google.com/search?source...31.wKHZId_-M2I
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post #15 of 15 Old 03-27-2019, 03:53 PM
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A good video explnantion here by FWW ....

Here's a good explanation, but it does not deal with tapered extensions:
https://www.finehomebuilding.com/201...nd-window-trim

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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