need help on cutting an acute angle for crown when the mitre saw has reached capacity - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 10-11-2012, 06:47 PM Thread Starter
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need help on cutting an acute angle for crown when the mitre saw has reached capacity

Like my title says, I'm in the middle of a project putting crown in some condos, and have tried coping the molding for this corner and just about everything I can think of and it just falls down to not enough experience, so I want to ask, what do you do when an angle is so acute that your mitre saw cant cut it because it doesn't have the reach? the corner is really sharp at 150*, any suggestions?

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post #2 of 8 Old 10-11-2012, 07:02 PM
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Can you provide a picture?

Are you able to hold the crown molding at the spring angle?
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post #3 of 8 Old 10-11-2012, 07:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dvalery20 View Post
Like my title says, I'm in the middle of a project putting crown in some condos, and have tried coping the molding for this corner and just about everything I can think of and it just falls down to not enough experience, so I want to ask, what do you do when an angle is so acute that your mitre saw cant cut it because it doesn't have the reach? the corner is really sharp at 150*, any suggestions?
this is 150 degrees, is this what you have?


or do yo have this?
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post #4 of 8 Old 10-11-2012, 09:20 PM
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DV,
I have run across angles like this before. When I have to cut a very steep angle that is beyond the capability of the saw, I make up a 90 degree fence and bring the crown mold perpendicular to the saw fence. At this point I am dealing with an angle that is 90 degrees less than the original, if you follow what I'm doing. Then I can set the saw at the remaining angle to make the cut. I use a sawhorse to support the other end of the crownmolding. You have to be very careful doing this, as is isn't really what the saw was designed to do. Here's a pic to illustrate. The angle of the crown where it runs into the cathedral ceiling is normally beyond the capability of the saw, but I was able to cut it using the method described above.
Mike Hawkins
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post #5 of 8 Old 10-11-2012, 09:52 PM
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inside corner i would guess if he is trying to cope it. you need to cut the crown at 75 degrees. it isn't an easy cut to make. probably easiest way is to cut it flat.

Last edited by DannyT; 10-11-2012 at 09:55 PM.
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post #6 of 8 Old 10-12-2012, 02:00 AM
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There is a jig here that may help:
http://www.garymkatz.com/Publication...cuteAngles.pdf

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #7 of 8 Old 10-12-2012, 07:02 AM
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With crown moldings, there can be situations where coping the inside corner doesn't make sense. Bisecting the angle with a miter is used instead. When this is the case, you often want to avoid placing nails in those corners since they can push the molding forcing it to open at the miter. Using a construction adhesive in these rare circumstances can give you the hold you want without putting unwanted pressure on the joint. In some cases, fasteners or adhesive isn't really needed in the corners if the piece is long enough and has adequate fastening along the length. The last 16" isn't going any where. If you are in doubt in these situations, you can always make a backer block to fit correctly behind the molding which will prevent pushing the joint open.

There are a number of techniques you can use when you want to make a bevel or angle cut that is beyond the ability of the saw. Reorienting the work and cutting a complimentary angle can work. An example is ripping a 60 degree bevel on a board. A table saw will only bevel to 45 and with the face of the board flat on the saw table, you are limited. If you place the board up on edge and tip the blade to 30, the compliment of 60 in a 90 degree orientation, you can cut that 60 degree bevel. Using a wedge shaped block to position the work differently is another way that works well using a miter saw.

When I do crown on kitchen cabinets or furniture, I never cope the inside corners. I always use a backer and miter the corners. The corners never open and the molding is held firmly in place even if it gets hit or pulled on. This technique can also eliminate using any nails, risking splitting or having to fill any holes.
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post #8 of 8 Old 10-12-2012, 08:19 AM
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If an angle can't be measured accurately enough to cut miters on the the joining pieces, they can be marked at the top and bottom where they overlap/intersect. That cut can be tested on scrap if necessary.

An advantage to coping a corner, is that only one leg needs to be coped, and a guide line is created by the profile for the cut.





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