MDF Doors - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 19 Old 05-24-2011, 05:54 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 4
View Charvet7's Photo Album My Photos
MDF Doors

My girlfriend recently bought new doors for the house. As I started my installation I noticed they were not real wood but instead pure MDF. They do not chisel well for the hinges and I'm having a rough time with them.

Any advice for what tools to use on these types of doors? I probably need to get specific screws for the hinges as well.

Thanks
Charvet7 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 19 Old 05-24-2011, 06:12 PM
MGB
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 5
View MGB's Photo Album My Photos
Butt hinges?

Don't need special screws but you have to pre-drill of course. A Vix bit would help with this.

You have sharp tools? A nice freshly sharpened chisel should help alot.
MGB is offline  
post #3 of 19 Old 05-24-2011, 06:52 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 4
View Charvet7's Photo Album My Photos
Yes, butt hinges with round corners. Chisels probably arent the sharpest but they aren't dull either.

So the technique with MDF is the same with wood?
Charvet7 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 19 Old 05-24-2011, 08:55 PM
The Young Blood
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 550
View Locodcdude's Photo Album My Photos
Take your router (You do have a router I'm assuming?) And instead of chiseling all that out, take away as much as you can with a 1/4" straight bit. Then do any squaring you need to do with the chisels.
Locodcdude is offline  
post #5 of 19 Old 05-24-2011, 10:10 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 23
View RUSSR's Photo Album My Photos
MDF is not meant for a end impact only from back or front. Can we get Pic's on how you are installing the hinges?

Last edited by RUSSR; 05-24-2011 at 10:13 PM.
RUSSR is offline  
post #6 of 19 Old 05-25-2011, 11:29 PM
Member
 
craftsman jay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Connecticut, US
Posts: 40
View craftsman jay's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUSSR
MDF is not meant for a end impact only from back or front. Can we get Pic's on how you are installing the hinges?
I 2nd that. If they are MDF doors then they will chip easier than wood on the edges. Especially the corners. MDF is harder on the tools than real wood, but same tools apply.

Confirmat screws are ideal for PB and MDF (but I haven't seen them in smaller than 5 x 40mm). I've used normal hinge screws on MDF doors for doll cabinets. Haven't had anyone tell me they pulled out and my daughter yanks and pulls hers too. (these are the only doors I don't frame).

www.craftsmanjay.com

"My greatest creation wasn't made with my hands,
but my heart goes into everything I do." Craftsman Jay
craftsman jay is offline  
post #7 of 19 Old 05-26-2011, 07:13 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,327
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
These are strange doors. I have never seen any house doors that do not have a wood strip all around the edges.

George
GeorgeC is online now  
post #8 of 19 Old 05-26-2011, 07:58 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
These are strange doors. I have never seen any house doors that do not have a wood strip all around the edges.

George
+1. MDF doors are usually faced with MDF, but are framed with solid wood. The ones I've done work like wood doors, A solid MDF door would be way too heavy. Likewise, solid core doors are usually a core of industrial particle board, but still have a wood frame.

Just a tip on prepping the holes for the hinges. I don't use a vix bit or the spring loaded punches, as in both cases their application requires their impact/penetration to be EXACTLY 90 degrees to the edge. The very slightest offset when using will cause an offset hole (even the slightest) which will change the positioning of the screw when finally installed. This offset can make the hinge leaf move out of position. It can also keep the head of the screw from seating in the countersink evenly (or flush) or below the surface.

I prefer to set the hinge leaf where it goes, and then use a scratch awl and eyeball the center, place the point and give it a tap. Piloting the hole is done as straight as possible. One screw (a shorter one) can be inserted to fix the hinge to get the next hole(s). I use this same method for small box hardware using butt (leaf) type hinges.

Most door hardware comes with #9x1" screws that can be replaced with a coarse thread deep gullet screw.








.
cabinetman is offline  
post #9 of 19 Old 05-26-2011, 10:44 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 23
View RUSSR's Photo Album My Photos
These days I sell a lot of MDF doors with Euro hinges. I take a mill a disign in the center and use Sherwin Williams mill primer then paint with a enamal.
RUSSR is offline  
post #10 of 19 Old 05-26-2011, 10:57 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charvet7 View Post
My girlfriend recently bought new doors for the house. Thanks
I take this statement meaning "passage" doors not "kitchen cabinet" doors.








.
cabinetman is offline  
post #11 of 19 Old 05-27-2011, 03:20 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 4
View Charvet7's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks

Thanks for all the help guys.

George C

http://www.homedepot.com/Steves-Sons...searchNav=true

I wish they had wood strip around the corners. I really do not see how they wouldn't sag over time even if installed perfectly.

I do not own a router at this point and have given up on chiseling out hinges. They chip way too easily. Luckily this isn't a rush project so I'll let you know what happens.

Thanks
Charvet7 is offline  
post #12 of 19 Old 06-28-2011, 07:39 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2
View mariatudor's Photo Album My Photos
MDF doors info

About 65 to 70 percent of a tree can be used for solid lumber, but what about the rest? In the past the answer was simple: It was burned or dumped in landfills. Today more than 95 percent of a harvested tree can be put to good use thanks in great part to the increased use of engineered wood products.Among these, medium density fiber board, or MDF, has loved amazing success over the past few years.
mariatudor is offline  
post #13 of 19 Old 07-09-2011, 01:23 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 14
View california's Photo Album My Photos
i had the same problem with my doors
california is offline  
post #14 of 19 Old 10-01-2011, 05:16 PM
Junior Member
 
Trimguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: WA State
Posts: 15
View Trimguy's Photo Album My Photos
I had never installed MDF doors during my entire career, until recently. Within the past two years I have installed more of these crap ass doors than I care to think about. Whoever the chinsy jerkwad that thought up using this material in this application needs to be dragged into the street and beaten repeatedly! They are trash! Glorified cardboard. I am sorry buddy, but over time you will regret your decision to use these instead of trying to return them or sell them to someone else. Structurally, they are just not up to the task of performing this function. MDF has many great applications. But as you have just discovered, setting them can be a living nightmare. I found my real issue in the installation came from trying to adjust the reveal when the door is closed. I found the MDF jam was unpredictable and warped easily. Maybe its just me. As for the hinges, having worked with MDF as much as I have I will tell you, I believe using a chisel is overkill. Trace out your hinges and score with a razor blade. THEN remove the excess with a chisel. you won't need a hammer either because the stuff just literally peels away. My experience taught me that any screws relying upon the structural integrity of MDF (especially with gravity as a factor) will fail rather quickly. What I did was used 2 1/2 inch screw to get back to the 2x4 of the door frame. I also pre drilled my holes and shimmed with compression of the cardboard, er ... I mean MDF... in mind. Pure junk if you ask me. NEVER use them of my own volition!

"No matter how many times I cut it, I am STILL too short!"

Last edited by Trimguy; 10-01-2011 at 05:22 PM.
Trimguy is offline  
post #15 of 19 Old 10-02-2011, 03:44 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Whittier, CA. USA
Posts: 344
View jlord's Photo Album My Photos
If you do not want to chisel them out then I would buy or borrow a router. Buy an inexpensive hinge jig. Porter cable makes a cheap plastic one you can get at Home Dept or Lowes. Or buy one made by Templico (preffered over the plastic PC jig). Use a 1/2" hinge bit or straight bit with a 5/8" template guide installed in the base. This is the usual combination for hinge jigs. The 1/2" bit will machine the 1/4" radius your hinges have with no further work. If they were square then you just square off the corners with a chisel. If you are using a 5/8" radius hinges then you will need a larger radius bit & template guide for these jigs or a hinge template to match the 5/8" radius hinges. I like to use a vix or hinge bit to pre drill to mount the hinges. Much easier to find screw centers. Don't use one that will over drill for your screws.

http://www.amazon.com/Porter-http://...duct/1214.html

Cable-59370-Door-Hinge-Template/dp/B00004TI3O

James
Whittier, CA.

Just because you can, doesn't always mean you should!
jlord is offline  
post #16 of 19 Old 10-02-2011, 02:06 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 3
View vicky's Photo Album My Photos
Unhappy

I have a big problem I need help with!! My husband and I are fixing up our house to sell. we bought a swing patio door from an individual. it is a wooden very heavy and nice door!! we got a deal on it but!!!! we did not notice that the door opens the wrong way! it is a left hand center, we need it to be a right hand center!! is there any way we can switch the doors. one door is stationary. so the problem is how do we take the stationary door off? can someone help?
vicky is offline  
post #17 of 19 Old 10-02-2011, 02:42 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by vicky View Post
I have a big problem I need help with!! My husband and I are fixing up our house to sell. we bought a swing patio door from an individual. it is a wooden very heavy and nice door!! we got a deal on it but!!!! we did not notice that the door opens the wrong way! it is a left hand center, we need it to be a right hand center!! is there any way we can switch the doors. one door is stationary. so the problem is how do we take the stationary door off? can someone help?


If you start your own thread, your topic can be addressed directly, and separately from this thread.








.
cabinetman is offline  
post #18 of 19 Old 10-19-2011, 11:31 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 4
View Charvet7's Photo Album My Photos
So I finally got the doors up. I told you it wasn't a rush project. haha. I succeeded by using a new 60 tooth wood blade on the saw for making the cuts and rips. Then for the hinges I purchased a dremel trio and routed the grooves in the door. Definitely more time consuming than hanging a wood door, and a lot of beginning frustration, but once you get in the groove its worth it considering the price and knowing your using recycled wood. I'm very happy the feel of the door and privacy it brings in the home (Sound).

My last problem is when drilling the holes for the door handles. My 18v makita screw gun stood no chance. I went to the Home depot and was going to buy a Milwalkee 3/8" 2500rpm drill for $69. Then a general contractor who was browsing next to me reccomended the step up, the 1/2" Milwalkee drill for $119. I went with it because of his raves and now regret it. The 1/2" drill I bought only has 850rpms opposed to the 2500rpms on the 3/8". I believe the higher rpm is better for cutting mdf. I got through the work, but it wasn't easy, and took time. I'm thinking of returning the heavy duty drill, and going with the higher rpm one for future work, in less anybody can tell me some pros of keeping it? Would it have still been hard to drill though with higher rpm drill? What are the pros of the lower rpm?

Thanks everyone for your help
Charvet7 is offline  
post #19 of 19 Old 10-19-2011, 12:12 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
If both drills were VSR (variable speed reverse) I would opt for the 3/8" for a few reasons. There are less DIY projects where you would need a 1/2" chuck. The 1/2" is likely heavier and bulkier. The 3/8" offers the speed needed for many applications. IMO it's a better all around drill.

A convenient 1/2" drill would be a drill/hammerdrill, for those times you would need that ability.








.
cabinetman is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
stained doors pattj65 General Woodworking Discussion 3 08-12-2010 04:57 PM
Ipe Doors 411??? rkwjunior General Woodworking Discussion 2 06-03-2010 10:45 PM
mdf doors bburen General Woodworking Discussion 4 08-18-2009 02:44 PM
Inset Doors Aragorn Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 11 06-20-2009 11:46 PM
Red Oak Doors Michael General Woodworking Discussion 1 01-02-2007 10:39 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome