Making trim molding - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 10-18-2013, 12:26 PM Thread Starter
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Making trim molding

I'm not sure if this is where I should post this, but it seems like a good place to start. I build custom picture frames and up to this point I have been buying trim molding to use around the edges. I have all the tools necessary to make my own, or at least I think I do. I would like to be able to both save money and make the molding more "custom" for my artists. I'm not overly impressed with the selection of router bits that I have come across locally, and I'm just wondering if I could get some direction from the more experienced of you out there. Any help and advice is appreciated.
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post #2 of 12 Old 10-18-2013, 04:57 PM
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Hi - I like doing picture frames and you don't really need a lot of special bits. I just use a straight bit for the rabbet around the back. For the fronts, I have a multi bead and a multi flute bit as well as a couple of architectural molding bits. Here is a fairly inexpensive source of bits and the quality isn't bad.
http://stores.ebay.com/Precision-Bit...=p4634.c0.m322
The trick is to combine profiles, that is, just use part of the profile from one bit and part of the profile from another. The black frame in the picture, I used the same bit I made the base molding with but only used part of the profile and used a round over bit to finish it off. The stained one was made with a 3-bead multi beading bit. Just takes a little practice.
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John

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post #3 of 12 Old 10-18-2013, 09:48 PM
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You might look into getting a small molder. Something like a Belsaw molder or Grizzly has one in their catalog, a model G1037Z. It runs $995.00. You can also find knife sets for it on ebay for as little as 10 bucks. If you are handy you can also custom grind your own designs as well.
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post #4 of 12 Old 10-19-2013, 09:35 AM
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Just some general rambling...its about safety and convenience.

The safety here isn't soley about your digits(fingers).....its also about a safe cut on the wood/part itself.It is somewhat irrespective of what the equip is.The less lumber wrestling you do the better.

So,take a look at your RT....visualize the stock running across the table,before "the cut"....then there is the "critical time",right at the cutting point......then we have the outfeed side.

Any and everything you can do to minimilize unwanted movement in these above areas will pay bennies in your finished product.So,start taking a critical look at "hold-downs",You need to be able to run the "what-ifs" in your head at a moments notice.This is machine setup 101.It takes focus and practice.

Next is safety,both for fingers and for parts.You can really turbocharge your machine setups when you can start thinking how the guard can and should,dbl as an alignment "part".One of the reasons power feeders are so well thought of in the biz......is only partly because of their efficient/consistant feed rate......its also because of their physical size that makes them a quite effective "guard" in of itself.

We have all sorts of names for our guard systems here at the estate.A "tophat" is a style that we would use on a rare occasion that theres a moulding head on the TS.It's named so because it looks like a tophat...duh.But it is a custom guard that goes with a particular cutter on a TS.It gets clamped to the table and it forces the stock into alignment before,during,after the cut.You can build them as fancy or Fred Flintstone as you want.The safety factor is HUGE on a tophat style guard.The bloomin moulding head can come apart and it is going to be contained.Got the idea from dragracing blankets on bellhousings.

Just sayin,it isn't always "my machine is bigger than your machine"....the amt of practice in setting up equipment,and having the responsibilty of employees WRT safety plays a more vital role than the actual machine itself.And is the reason the sawstop co. exists,and also the reason it chaps the arse of so many longtime WW'ers.It places responsibilty on the machine instead of what's between your ears.And is NOT the right way to do it.It takes a conscious discapline of sorts.....and it comes from practice setting up the cut.You do it,and you'll see a marked improvement in your stock quality.

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
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post #5 of 12 Old 10-19-2013, 09:50 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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router tables, molders and ...the table saw?

Yep, for years Craftsman offered a molding set with either one or 3 blades that insert into it. They are held in securely with a set screw through a hole, so don't worry about them flying out.
Do worry about making hold downs and feeding incrementally by raising the height a small amount at a time, an 1/8" or so. A dado insert is also a necessity for the throat plate also!





Depending on your table saw, it may or may not work or fit up? Check your manual. The older Craftsman cast iron saws are perfect for these molder heads:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Sear...item485b78a602

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-20-2013 at 09:50 AM.
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post #6 of 12 Old 10-20-2013, 07:55 AM
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Looking up at Bill's pic..........these "kits" may not fit in or agree with some folks shops,but I like them.

More rambling.....one of the first decisions,irrespective(somewhat)...of what pce of equipment we're runnin the stock through(RT,TS,moulder,shaper)is whether or not the part will or has a "land".Don't know where that term comes from?Probably gunworld(lands and grooves)?

Anyway a land is....well,how about what a land isn't?If your mould goes in one end of machine and comes out the other end with NO part of that edge/side of stock remaining.....there isn't a land.Meaning,you shove a sq pce in....and a pce of quarter rnd is coming out...you cut away all of the registration that the original edge/side had.

On a shaper there's usually a split fence design that allows you to advance the out feed side to take up any "slack" for missing wood.But in the case of a TS you don't have that luxury.BUT...if you design/setup the pc of mould so that there is some remaining stock(land),it serves to guide on outfeed side.

So,you engage your brain before ever turning machine on.Run the sequencing through you mind a cpl different ways.IOWs,you have an idea of how you want to run this pce of mould.Literally run,and count how many operations and "cuts" it takes with this plan....call it "A".Then come up with another,plan "B".And one more.

Now,with the criterea of safety(fingers,part,and machine wear) AND convenience,see which of your plans work the best.Leaving a "land" that can be machined off rates high marks in several categories....what other concerns can you make "rules" about?

"Rules" here isn't about taking out the trash or not getting drunk on Sat. night....it's rules in design,rules in procedure,rules in safety,etc,etc.,these are "good" rules.Heck,we may not even have any employees.....and still have rules.It makes machine setups way faster.For instance,I really,really don't like touching a cutting tool's edge,gives me the heeby jeeby's....and this is irrespective of whether the tool is mounted,dismounted,dull,sharp.I just don't touch them.

Another,for instance rule might be to always make your rough stock 6" longer to allow for snipe.It might also be to always run a test monkey pc through first(before runnin the "good" stuff $$).So,make some good sound rules for your moulding processes and stick to them.It will become second nature,and one less thing to worry about.

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
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post #7 of 12 Old 10-20-2013, 09:58 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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right on!

Especially about the "land" or registration remaining on the table.

It's much easier to use a wider piece of stock than needed for your profile and then use a table saw to remove the land after it's finished. You will have the same issue however, with losing the registration on the table, but there are ways around it.

On a tablesaw, you can use a sled to clamp and hold the work OR make a spacer underneath the low end if that will work. If it has a flat backside, then just flip it over.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-20-2013 at 05:39 PM.
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post #8 of 12 Old 10-20-2013, 11:36 AM
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There are many ways to make mouldings, with a router, or the table saw. Corub Cutters makes many profiles that fit their heads, and many other heads including Craftsman.






.
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post #9 of 12 Old 10-20-2013, 02:22 PM Thread Starter
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You guys have given me lots of great info! I've been on the go and reading it on my phone as you post, so when I get home I'll pull it all up and really mull it over. I build something about 20 times in my head before I ever turn on a saw or a tool, so I get what you guys are saying as far as the thinking it through process. I inherited my shop and have lots of router bits to play with, along with my router table. Some of those I have absolutely no idea what they are used for, but I learn every day.
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post #10 of 12 Old 10-22-2013, 12:09 PM
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Take a look at these different router bits available. There are wood samples next to them for some idea's. Have a great day!
Tom
http://rockysaw.wix.com/diamondrouterbit

I'm confident that there is a lot of knowledge and help here...you could also checkout more router jig video's and tips for your trimmings here to educate yourself, "Be safe". http://www.finewoodworking.com/woodworking-videos/
Tom

Last edited by Rockysaw; 10-22-2013 at 12:25 PM.
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post #11 of 12 Old 11-03-2013, 08:54 PM
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Keep in mind you can always have your own router bits or shaper knives made however you want. If you can make a cad file most manufactures can make a cutter.
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post #12 of 12 Old 11-03-2013, 10:30 PM
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A little late to the party, but being that you don't need miles of molding, have you ever given thought to scratch stock?
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