Kitchen Table (DIY) need advice. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 13 Old 03-13-2016, 07:51 PM Thread Starter
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Kitchen Table (DIY) need advice.

Hello

First off, i am new to the forum... i am a amateur and mad respect to carpenters... but i need help..

i have done a few projects, with simple cuts, using cedar (outdoors)... this one, i think, was a bit more complicated for me.

i am building a new kitchen table, 60" round. i am working on the table top right now. 2x4x8 pines glued to together to form sections of the table top. With a 2x6x8 cross beam. joining everything with biscuit joiners. i love the tool.

There are 4 sections, each section is getting 2x4s in a pattern. I cut the 2x4x8 into 4 equal parts. i.e. squares, and then cut on the diagonal and then criss crossed each diagonal piece.

when you look at the picture, there are parts where the two pieces are flush, and others where there is a gap. how do i fix this...

tool wise, i have a

circular saw
mitre saw
jigsaw

no table saw

thanx in advance for the help
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post #2 of 13 Old 03-13-2016, 08:30 PM Thread Starter
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sorry... here are pix.
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post #3 of 13 Old 03-14-2016, 09:05 AM
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making furniture from construction grade lumber is challenging because the lumber often is in need of jointing and planing to get it true. then the moisture content is still high and it often shrinks and cracks.


if you can run your miter saw down the 45 degree miter (with a straight edge if possible) then pull the 2 halves together.
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post #4 of 13 Old 03-14-2016, 09:33 AM
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Is the table already glued up or is this a dry fit? A dry fit is always encouraged so that problems of this type can be spotted.

George
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post #5 of 13 Old 03-14-2016, 09:34 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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table design

You are wanting to make a round table out of 4 sections .... not the best design concept. It would be better to have 8 section like an octagon which would more easily transform into a circle. You will still have the joinery issues, actually twice as many, but it will look better in the end. JMO :smile3:

Making all those miter cuts accurately is a real challenge, especially without a table saw. So here's my approach. You can make 2 halves then join the halves together, adjusting them or hand planing the edge to get it a perfect mate with the other half. OR... You can assemble each individual section separately, then fit them together as 4 or 8 segments rather than working with small individual pieces.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 13 Old 03-14-2016, 11:08 AM
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It can be done

I think your idea is workable, although the results will depend on your skill. After joining/gluing the pieces, leave them to dry for a week. Then use a jig saw to cut the circular shape of the table top. For this you can use a circle jig which comes with most jig saws (or you can make a simple one with plywood):
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post #7 of 13 Old 03-15-2016, 02:50 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Is the table already glued up or is this a dry fit? A dry fit is always encouraged so that problems of this type can be spotted.

George
unfortunately or fortunately - YES. each of those original sections have been glued and then cut in half diagonally.

I think i am going to try my best to make the diagonals line-up, with an almost even gap between them, across the entire diagonal.

i am likely going to use a block planer and slowly shave down the diagonal where it looks like it prevents the two from lining up. and then from there, glue and wood fill. thoughts?

or

line-up the backs on each triangle, transpose the diagonal from one to the other and shave off where i can...

This is my first attempt with construction grade lumber, i used it, because of its thickness.

What do other use? My local big box, only has 1" thickness. i find these "skinny" for certain applications.
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post #8 of 13 Old 03-15-2016, 03:22 PM Thread Starter
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and i think i am going to invest in a router.
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post #9 of 13 Old 03-15-2016, 09:07 PM
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If it weren't for the material, (spruce framing lumber) I'd suggest you rent a plunge router, make a router jig then route a dado through the errant miter cuts, then insert a linear strip, however even with a very sharp bit you're likely to get lots of tear out on end cut spruce. Maybe make your own track saw jig for your circ then line it up for a couple 3 linear cuts along the miters. In the future consider aligning the but ends with the cross and gluing the group together then miter the group.

Work smart not hard!
Never bite the hand that looks dirty
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post #10 of 13 Old 03-16-2016, 06:59 AM
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if it is only glue, then take a chisel and a hammer and cut out the offending blocks and reset new ones.
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post #11 of 13 Old 03-17-2016, 10:04 AM Thread Starter
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after some reflection, i have decided to scrap the table. IMO, I do not think a kitchen table should have ridges in between. it would be straight and flat. I can see my wife getting annoyed with me after the first cup of tea split.

i will finish it just for the practise... but i feel defeated...

round 2.

use dried wood that has nice clean edges and mitre cut every individual piece and then lastly glue sections together.

Last edited by ptdm; 03-17-2016 at 10:11 AM.
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post #12 of 13 Old 03-17-2016, 06:17 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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well, almost ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by ptdm View Post
after some reflection, i have decided to scrap the table. IMO, I do not think a kitchen table should have ridges in between. it would be straight and flat. I can see my wife getting annoyed with me after the first cup of tea split.

i will finish it just for the practise... but i feel defeated...

round 2.

use dried wood that has nice clean edges and mitre cut every individual piece and then lastly glue sections together.
I would make the sections as separate units. Then you can hand plane all the edges straight. You can fit the units together indiviually to for the "whole" to see how they dry fit together. Then make any adjustments based on that. Then you can glue them all in place on a piece of plywood.

Then if you want a smooth surface pour a "bar top" epoxy on it OR use a piece of plate glass to cover it...DONE!

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #13 of 13 Old 03-29-2016, 12:51 PM
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There is a basic problem in your design, with the board ends butting against a board running perpendicular to them there will be expansion across those boards but little expansion along the length of the board they are butting against. As the humidy changes over the seasons the will be cracks opening and closing in the top.

“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”
― Marcus Aurelius
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