Kitchen Cabinet Hinge issues - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 15 Old 04-12-2013, 04:03 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 4
View RickMNJ's Photo Album My Photos
Question Kitchen Cabinet Hinge issues

Hi all,

I'm trying to straighten out a situation and need some advice as to which direction to go.

I had the majority of my Birch (plywood) kitchen cabinet doors refinished with a few being remade. Done by a friend who owed me a favor.

When reinstalling I found that some doors did not fit properly. Apparently the original hinges have next to no adjustment capability. To make matters worse I can't even find these or similar hinges anywhere.

So, thinking that these are no longer available, especially in a version that's adjustable, I'm hoping I can get some recommendations on which (inset?) hinge to use.

I'm guessing I may have to either leave the notch at the top of the door or fill somehow. BTW, most doors have some measure of alignment issues so I'm likely going to rehinge the majority of them.

Attached is a pic to illustrate my set up.

Thanks in advance!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Kitchen cabinet hinge.jpg
Views:	10379
Size:	53.4 KB
ID:	68117  


Last edited by RickMNJ; 04-12-2013 at 04:06 PM.
RickMNJ is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 Old 04-12-2013, 04:07 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos

Those hinges are available if you want them. Their adjustment is from the slotted holes.





.
cabinetman is offline  
post #3 of 15 Old 04-12-2013, 04:35 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 4
View RickMNJ's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the quick reply, Cabinetman. Unfortunately I need more flexibility adjustment-wise. I'm hoping to gain door height and left/right (horizontal) adjustment capabilities.

Can you tell me what type of hinge I have and what I might use in it's place?
RickMNJ is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 15 Old 04-12-2013, 05:06 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickMNJ View Post
Thanks for the quick reply, Cabinetman. Unfortunately I need more flexibility adjustment-wise. I'm hoping to gain door height and left/right (horizontal) adjustment capabilities.

Can you tell me what type of hinge I have and what I might use in it's place?
If you can fix the cutout at the outer edge, you could use a concealed euro hinge for face frames and an overlay type. They would need to be bored (35mm) into the back of the door.





.
cabinetman is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to cabinetman For This Useful Post:
mics_54 (04-12-2013)
post #5 of 15 Old 04-13-2013, 08:22 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
In my area that type of hinge is known as a knife hinge. Sometimes if you put in new hinges and change brands its necessary to alter the size of the door to make fit. There really isn't very much adjustment.

http://www.thehardwarecity.com/getPr...tart=KM&end=KP
Steve Neul is offline  
post #6 of 15 Old 04-13-2013, 11:32 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Maine
Posts: 1,932
View Hammer1's Photo Album My Photos
Those style hinges are common and still available, known as a pivot hinge, knife style hinges are a little different. There is limited adjustment once the screw holes are drilled but you can drill holes as needed. It's important to be able to drill the pilot holes dead center of the screw holes in the hinges. Use a sharp awl to mark the hole, use the correct size drill bit and wrap a piece of tape around the shaft of the bit so you know when to stop and not drill completely through the doors. There are also Vix bits that will center and drill the holes at the proper depth. You can fill existing holes with a piece of wooden match, point the end a little and drive them in the existing hole, cut the excess off flush. The hinge plates will cover existing holes so they aren't seen. A piece of paper or cardboard can be placed underneath the hinges, too. Paper matchbook covers are a handy size for shimming if needed. With a little ingenuity, you can make those hinges adjust to the conditions, within reason. Changing out those hinges, especially to Euro styles isn't an easy task if you aren't an experienced woodworker with the necessary tools.
http://www.hardwaresource.com/hinges...42+Pivot+Hinge
Hammer1 is offline  
post #7 of 15 Old 04-13-2013, 11:38 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 4
View RickMNJ's Photo Album My Photos
Gentlemen, Thanks for the responses and for the proper term for the hinge.

I'm thinking of using this to replace what's there now.... http://www.ebay.com/itm/Euro-Hydraul...item2c5c873433
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	insethinge.jpg
Views:	9797
Size:	63.0 KB
ID:	68183  

RickMNJ is offline  
post #8 of 15 Old 04-13-2013, 11:54 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickMNJ View Post
Gentlemen, Thanks for the responses and for the proper term for the hinge.

I'm thinking of using this to replace what's there now.... http://www.ebay.com/itm/Euro-Hydraul...item2c5c873433
It appears that from your first picture that your cabinets are faced framed. The hinge and mounting plate you pictured as a replacement is meant to be cabinet wall mounted in a frameless configuration. If you have face frames (wood added to the face edge of a cabinet that protrudes slightly into the opening), you need to pick a hinge/mounting plate for face framed cabinets.

Face frame hinges are figured in inches of overlay that the door lays on the cabinet, and orients its hinged edge.






.
cabinetman is offline  
post #9 of 15 Old 04-13-2013, 04:15 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 4
View RickMNJ's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for pointing that out. Yes, I was in error, I need hinges for an overlay configuration.

I see that there are different size hinges. I took measurements and documented in a drawing. Is the size I'm concerned with the "A" in my drawing? Also, am I looking for all "Full" overlay hinges or do I also need "Half" overlay when two doors meet back to back and are mounted to a common cabinet wall?

Thanks again.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by RickMNJ; 04-13-2013 at 04:19 PM.
RickMNJ is offline  
post #10 of 15 Old 04-14-2013, 01:14 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
You would need a different euro hinge for that application. With most of them full overlay means the door will overlap the opening 3/4". You are needing to overlay 1 1/2". Blum makes a "Compact 33" hinge with the wrap around backplates that would overlay 1 1/8" to 1 5/8". With that much adjustment if you had 3" of face having doors back to back you could use the same hinge for both applications.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #11 of 15 Old 04-14-2013, 06:28 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
You would need a different euro hinge for that application. With most of them full overlay means the door will overlap the opening 3/4". You are needing to overlay 1 1/2". Blum makes a "Compact 33" hinge with the wrap around backplates that would overlay 1 1/8" to 1 5/8". With that much adjustment if you had 3" of face having doors back to back you could use the same hinge for both applications.
It's been a while since I've used the "33" hinge, but IIRC, the doors cannot back up to eachother (hinge edge) with minimal clearance (⅛"), or less. They need more room for opening rotation. They also protrude the door off the face frame a minimum of 3/32". The cup hole should be drilled as close to the edge as possible...I drill them about 1/16" heavy, to 2mm.




.
cabinetman is offline  
post #12 of 15 Old 04-14-2013, 07:35 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,340
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
It appears that from your first picture that your cabinets are faced framed. The hinge and mounting plate you pictured as a replacement is meant to be cabinet wall mounted in a frameless configuration. If you have face frames (wood added to the face edge of a cabinet that protrudes slightly into the opening), you need to pick a hinge/mounting plate for face framed cabinets.

Face frame hinges are figured in inches of overlay that the door lays on the cabinet, and orients its hinged edge.






.
How about building out the space between the cabinet wall and the face frame. Then he could use a non-faceframe cabinet hinge.

I do not know if there is any advantage to this.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #13 of 15 Old 04-14-2013, 07:59 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
How about building out the space between the cabinet wall and the face frame. Then he could use a non-faceframe cabinet hinge.

I do not know if there is any advantage to this.

George
IMO, frameless hinge plates provide a sturdier mount for hinges.






.
cabinetman is offline  
post #14 of 15 Old 04-14-2013, 09:36 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
The compac 33 hinge would work but I think the best solution would be to cut the faceframe off the end panel and using a standard euro hinge. The faceframe was just put there to mount the knife hinges.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #15 of 15 Old 04-18-2013, 08:57 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Victor, MT
Posts: 36
View jessrj's Photo Album My Photos
Totally changing the door hinge will be a lot of work. I would be in favor of tweeking the existing hinges. You can shim the hinge plate attached to the face frame or move the hole that it is attached with if you cant get enough adjustment. Even if you have to Bondo the holes before you move it so the screws dont slip back in the same hole. This will take less time than changing the hinges.

Sharpened Multimaster Blades
www.mmbladesaver.com
jessrj is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kitchen Cab Door hinge Al B Thayer Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 4 02-03-2013 03:21 PM
Cabinet hinge overlay jschaben General Woodworking Discussion 5 11-22-2012 11:53 AM
Non-mortise hinge on narrow face frame cabinet Richard Siegfried General Woodworking Discussion 1 07-15-2010 03:38 PM
Help me locate this odd cabinet hinge! Jonathan Gellman General Woodworking Discussion 3 03-25-2010 09:32 PM
Kitchen Cabinet rocky.disalva Power Tools & Machinery 5 07-05-2008 09:47 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome