Installing crown Moulding - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 12-04-2013, 09:34 AM Thread Starter
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Installing crown Moulding

I,m to the point now where I need to install crown moulding in my work shop. I'm kinda confused as to just what type of nail gun to use on this moulding. I do have a 16 ga. finish nailer, but is this one sufficient to properly attach this stuff or do I need a different type of nailer? Are there any tried and true suggestions out there?
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post #2 of 11 Old 12-04-2013, 09:56 AM
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Crown molding in a workshop?

When installing in my house I used an 18 gauge pin nailer to tack up the molding. I then came back with finishing nails to permanently mount.

George
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post #3 of 11 Old 12-04-2013, 11:15 AM
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I use 16 ga finish nails 2" long. I also had some installed by a professional carpenter because I do not do high ladders and he also used 2" 16ga finish nails.
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post #4 of 11 Old 12-04-2013, 01:35 PM
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It makes a difference what you are nailing into. If you are going through one layer of sheet rock, 1 5/8" or 2" 18 gauge nails will work along the bottom into the wall studs. For the top edge there is always the question of what is back there? Sometimes you can hit the ceiling joists on 2 sides of the room. Some guys shoot 2 nails angled in opposite direction, hoping to have the crown molding hold to the sheet rock only. I cannot accept that. It is too easy for gaps to form that way. I rip angled 2 x 4 strips and nail them to the ceiling corner through to the top plate of the wall with framing nails. This strip is cut to fill the space behind the crown molding. I can nail through the crown into this strip with 1 5/8" or 2" 18 gauge nails and get a good grab. I prefer 18 gauge nails only because the nail holes are not as visible when filled with putty...and 18 gauge nails will not split the crown as easily as 16 gauge when nailing close to the end.

I also use 1" 18 gauge nails to pin outside corners. On inside corners, where I cope one piece to the previous one, I use 1" 18 gauge nails to pin the top inside corner to the previous piece to hold them tight together.
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post #5 of 11 Old 12-04-2013, 09:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
Crown molding in a workshop?
George
George, you don't?

I have crown in my workshop around the ceiling and around the ash cabinets I made for in there. Also put some in the shop addition the year before, cathedral ceiling too.
Mike Hawkins
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post #6 of 11 Old 12-05-2013, 08:38 AM
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You can use the 16 GA since the nails won't be under shear force. A couple issues with 16 GA guns, the nail head is rectangular, you have to position the gun so the nail head runs with the grain, sometimes the nail head will lift a chip when it sinks in. Most 16 GA guns have straight nail magazines and longer nails stick out the bottom, be careful they don't ding the wall since you will be holding the gun straight up and down. Finish carpenters prefer 15 GA guns because the magazine is normally angled and stays out of the way. The round head nail makes a smaller hole and the nail shanks are more stout. The gun tip is often longer and smaller so it gets in tighter spots but 16 GA is fine if that's what you have, the serrated shanks hold quite well.
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post #7 of 11 Old 12-06-2013, 11:32 AM Thread Starter
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Installing crown moulding

Thanks for all the replies. I'll be nailing into furring strips and thru paneling that I have applied to the walls and ceiling. Looks like I'll be using my 16 ga. finish nailer, as I usually don't buy my tools until I actually need them.
Thanks again.
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post #8 of 11 Old 12-06-2013, 12:22 PM
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It would depend on what the crown was, and what I had to attach to. In most cases, an 18 ga will have enough length to secure from either the lower part of the crown or near the top.






.

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post #9 of 11 Old 12-14-2013, 12:10 PM
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Ha I laughed when I read this thread I pulled some really nice oak crown out of my house cause my wife loves white crown in a special pattern I have only found in MDF any way I took this crown and put it up in my workshop not only because I thought I would look really cool but also because when I bring cabinet clients into my wood shop I want them to be impressed I thought I have to be the only $&#•A$$ with crown in my woodshop WRONG! Anyway I love my crown in my shop it really sets it off
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post #10 of 11 Old 12-15-2013, 10:48 AM
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If you know where the wood is you can use 18 gauge with no problems as long as the crown will be nestled into the corner and shot into the wall and ceiling. If the crown was free floating and wall shot only I would go 15 gauge and make sure you hit wood.

I understand another posters concern with opposing angle shot nails into drywall only, but believe me we have done 1000's of feet of this in applications where wood is not available to nail into or it cant be located. You have to shoot a lot more nails than 16 OC but if you ever tried to remove a crown shot this way you will see how hard it is. Again you can use the 18 gauge gun for this putting the wall shot ones on a downward angle and the ceiling shot ones on an outward angle (as much as possible). Plus once the crown is caulked and painted that locks it in even more. We have seen no significant signs of this method failing and we frequently access past projects when showing new clients our work. Mind you its not my first choice but it does work.
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post #11 of 11 Old 12-21-2013, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by shopman View Post
If you know where the wood is you can use 18 gauge with no problems as long as the crown will be nestled into the corner and shot into the wall and ceiling. If the crown was free floating and wall shot only I would go 15 gauge and make sure you hit wood.

I understand another posters concern with opposing angle shot nails into drywall only, but believe me we have done 1000's of feet of this in applications where wood is not available to nail into or it cant be located. You have to shoot a lot more nails than 16 OC but if you ever tried to remove a crown shot this way you will see how hard it is. Again you can use the 18 gauge gun for this putting the wall shot ones on a downward angle and the ceiling shot ones on an outward angle (as much as possible). Plus once the crown is caulked and painted that locks it in even more. We have seen no significant signs of this method failing and we frequently access past projects when showing new clients our work. Mind you its not my first choice but it does work.
I couldn't agree more. I actually shoot through the same hole to make it easier on the painters. When you have been doing this professionally for over a quarter century-you know what works and what doesn't. I don't work on cheap houses either- usually multi-million dollar homes.

Also as stated: when you do the demo, you find out how well things are really attached. I've shot pre-finished stain grade crown this way that never got caulked without issue. I try to hit wood as much as possible so usually only do this where there is none.

Here's a real testament to the method- how about shooting 14" closet cleats? (Not something I do anymore- just very early in my career) but none of mine have failed to my knowledge and demo'ing similar ones has proven it a viable option.

The main thing is the caulk- it holds stuff in place.
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