How to trim on an angled wall - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 09-30-2010, 01:30 PM Thread Starter
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How to trim on an angled wall

I'm putting up crown and another 1" trim board about 3" below the crown in my parent's bedroom. Most of the room is square ceilings, but there is a small section where the roof comes down and creates an angled wall surface (1 3/4 story house). I'm ok with the crown, but where I'm having difficulty is where 1" lower trim intersects from the flat wall to the angled wall, both on inside and outside corners. My first thought is to put a filler behind the trim on the angled wall so that the trim piece itself is plump and the miters are at 45's, but I'm afraid that will look unprofessional.

Any ideas?
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post #2 of 16 Old 09-30-2010, 01:36 PM
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Is there any way you can post a picture?
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post #3 of 16 Old 09-30-2010, 02:57 PM Thread Starter
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I can take one tonight.
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post #4 of 16 Old 10-01-2010, 11:34 AM Thread Starter
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Here are the pics. Like I said, I can handle the crown, I'll just trim the bulk off the back side so the miters line up and the bottom hits the wall the same. The extra 1" bead that I'm putting 3" below the crown is the hard part. As of now my only solution is to cut a filler so the bead stays plumb and the miters line up.
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post #5 of 16 Old 10-01-2010, 11:37 AM Thread Starter
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pics...
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post #6 of 16 Old 10-01-2010, 11:49 AM
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Yep, I would say a filler, or mill a one piece bead with a beveled back.

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OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

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post #7 of 16 Old 10-01-2010, 12:30 PM
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Yes that will work for the filler. But your crown is going to be a real challenge too.
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post #8 of 16 Old 10-01-2010, 12:32 PM Thread Starter
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With the crown I plan on shaving a bit off the back side to allow the bottom to sit closer to the wall. If needed I'll put a small filler in there too.
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post #9 of 16 Old 10-01-2010, 06:35 PM
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Man thanks for posting the pictures, I needed the laugh.
I hope it goes well for you. Just remember the first rule; Never work for family.
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post #10 of 16 Old 10-01-2010, 06:54 PM
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For the crown to follow, the angle would have to follow, and a filler added to the bottom edge. You might be able to work in a pendant.






.
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post #11 of 16 Old 10-01-2010, 08:10 PM
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Crown might not be for every situation. I could have used crown in my house but I made these two moldings for cove trim and painted the space between them black. The moldings in the picture both lay flat on the wall.

How to trim on an angled wall-cove-002.jpg

The top one is about 3 1/2", the bottom one is a chair rail and it's 2". The moldings are ash. I ground the knives on a UTC 25A, cut the strips on a Mattison 202, rough planed on a Northfield single 24, and ran the profiles on a Paulson 2X6. Finished with a custom lacquer stain made for me by Gemini, sprayed with a Binks model 7. The finish is Gemini vinyl lacquer sealer under Apollo 202. Both were sprayed hot with two Graco Presidents.

I'd just use a flat molding for the room and then make a special connecting piece with the correct profile and returns for the slope ceiling portion. If the molding will be painted, it's almost too easy because I could just make the sloped piece out of built up poly vinyl chloride or even plaster.

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post #12 of 16 Old 10-01-2010, 09:08 PM
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To jeepme79 and everyone else. I'd like to apologise for my awful attitude in my response earlier.
I had scotch blow back out my nose.(stings like a bugger) When I first read your post. the initial image of your dilemma in my mind included the family I work for. Frustrating is only one f word to describe it. (My eyes are still watering)
Dropping a 90* corner off the angle is an elegant solution to a trim challenge. Do that to both profiles, the effect would nicely balance and reinforce the step at the crown.
Glue a beveled strip to the back of an overlength piece of rail, then just mitre and install. Cut to fit.
You can fine tune the fit at the mitres using off cuts to shorten the angle just right.
The only other solution is to custom mill a section of the rail to match the outside mitre profile at the corner. Thats alotta hard trial and error. (sounds like fun )(oh I'm so jealous)
You have the opportunity to do the magic touch.
And besides its for Mom and Dad,(its a gotta do) make them proud.
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post #13 of 16 Old 10-02-2010, 09:12 AM
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i would build them a custom book case and make that problem go away myself, and if my mom was still around i would do it in a heartbeat. back when i was first learning she would beam when she seen my crude work, i just wonder what she would do now lol.
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post #14 of 16 Old 10-02-2010, 07:32 PM
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As pointed out you will have a problem where the wall changes pitch. The trim will have to be larger and the profile custom made in order to do what you describe. To see how it will line up take a piece of trim and mark where it hits the ceiling and the wall on either side of the rake wall. Connect the lines along the rake wall. Measure the distance between the lines on the plumb walls, now measure the distance on the rake wall. You will find that they are not the same.
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post #15 of 16 Old 10-02-2010, 10:53 PM
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The pieces on the angled slope will have to "grow"

What not consider ripping the crown and the trim and adding thin spacer strips in the flat areas or rounded where it could be planed or sanded and would be least likely to show and glue it back together. It looks like a 3/8" or so of growth would do it. I could be wrong, didn't do the math and don't know the angle. It's only 3 ft or so of length. Saves making new crown etc. It's fudging a little but seems like it could be done easily and inconspicuously since it's going to be painted.
bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-03-2010 at 06:15 AM.
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post #16 of 16 Old 10-03-2010, 12:10 AM
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Here is an article I wrote addressing a similar situation, just think of the floor as the ceiling. http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2010/...board-returns/
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