How do I make this Custom Baseboard Trim...? See photos... - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 Old 09-10-2014, 09:26 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 28
View Wood_Chip's Photo Album My Photos
How do I make this Custom Baseboard Trim...? See photos...

I have a lot of custom baseboard trim installed throughout our house and would like to replace a few pieces and finish off some closets with matching material but I’m a bit perplexed on how to make them.Please see attached photos.It’s 1 x 4 pine material that has been carved on the top edge to give it a more rustic look.When I say carved, it has multiple different peelings at different angles and depths cut out of it on the top outer edge and then it appears to have been lightly sanded to remove any sharp edges and then possibly stained and polyurethaned.I don’t know if these were store purchased boards or they may have been custom sawn locally.

What I want to do is make some new ones and I don’t know they best way to get the custom cuts into them.I through of a drum or belt sander but thought it might take a really long time and there has to be something more effective and efficient to do it.I also thought of a hand peeling draw knife but these tend to split the wood more between fibers rather than cut it for a nice smooth peel.Anyway, what do some of you more experienced woodworkers recommend?I’d like to use a power tool that I can do it pretty quickly and have a nice finished product.Almost like something with a spinning wheel that I can just apply at different depths and angles to take the peelings out…?

Any help would be much appreciated.Thank you!
Attached Images
    
Wood_Chip is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old 09-10-2014, 09:32 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Illinois
Posts: 697
View mako1's Photo Album My Photos
I would try a belt sander first.Would be the quickest and easiest.Should get you there.
mako1 is offline  
post #3 of 12 Old 09-10-2014, 09:57 AM
Senior Member
 
3fingers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 417
View 3fingers's Photo Album My Photos
Draw knife, spoke shave, an sandpaper. This would be quick.
Or a angle grinder then finer sand paper. Both methods would be about the same time.

Last edited by 3fingers; 09-10-2014 at 09:59 AM.
3fingers is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 Old 09-10-2014, 04:05 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,468
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Go with the knife. Carve down grain to minimize cutting in too deep. With a good sharp knife this will be as quick as any other way.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #5 of 12 Old 09-10-2014, 05:27 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 26,046
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
It does look like it was done with a draw knife or spoke shave. I don't think I would go out and buy one for a few pieces of molding though. You might wrap a bunch of duct tape around a large butcher knife for a second handle and use that.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #6 of 12 Old 09-10-2014, 09:30 PM
Senior Member
 
fire65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 242
View fire65's Photo Album My Photos
Never done anything like that, but I would go with my draw knife if I was trying to reproduce that trim. It is not like you can screw it up, it is just shave it and do not think about it.
fire65 is offline  
post #7 of 12 Old 09-10-2014, 10:55 PM
Senior Member
 
OnealWoodworking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 1,128
View OnealWoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3fingers View Post
Draw knife, spoke shave, an sandpaper. This would be quick.
Or a angle grinder then finer sand paper. Both methods would be about the same time.
Air die grinder.

Would take seconds to shape that irregular pattern.
OnealWoodworking is offline  
post #8 of 12 Old 09-11-2014, 09:36 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 28
View Wood_Chip's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the feedback guys. I've never really used a draw knife for trim work. I've peeled bark off logs with one before, but I know that when you cut down grain (with the grain) the knife can track with the grain and then rather than cut it ends up splitting deeper and deeper into the wood so you don't get a "clean" cut. Maybe keeping the knife very sharp would minimize this. I like the idea of a belt sander, but don't know how efficient that would be either. Please keep the recommendations and feedback coming. Thanks!
Wood_Chip is offline  
post #9 of 12 Old 09-11-2014, 09:43 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,573
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
I'd use a router

Chamfer bits with different angles, 5, 7, 22, etc. will give you almost the same look that you need, but anything other than a sander will result in tear out. JMO.

25-Degree Chamfer Bit - 1/4" Shank

$29.99





CMT 11-1/4 Degree Chamfer Bit - 1/2" Shank

$29.99






The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 09-11-2014 at 09:46 AM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #10 of 12 Old 09-11-2014, 01:27 PM
Junior Member
 
rtutsky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Johnson City, NY
Posts: 29
View rtutsky's Photo Album My Photos
It looks to me like it was done with a router. Most likely hand guided with a long straight bit. I have done something like this before and requires some practice and patience, especially attempting to get a straight edge for some distance. It can be done with just one router bit (wider and deeper bit the better).
rtutsky is offline  
post #11 of 12 Old 09-11-2014, 05:29 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: houston, tx
Posts: 99
View tinstar's Photo Album My Photos
Since it's pine, I would just use a random orbit sander starting at 60grit. It doesn't look like a repeating pattern to me, more like a carpenter just worked it over with a sander. 60 grit should remove pine pretty fast.
tinstar is offline  
post #12 of 12 Old 09-11-2014, 09:29 PM
Village Idiot
 
epicfail48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Springfield MO
Posts: 4,941
View epicfail48's Photo Album My Photos
Meh, grab a butcher knife and hack at the top edge, looks like what was originally done.

Sorry, but i find that baseboard rather unsightly. On a more serious note, id grab a plane and approximate a roundover like that
epicfail48 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How do I refinish old douglas fir trim and baseboard? Forester7 Wood Finishing 4 01-22-2014 06:16 PM
Baseboard Trim and Baseboard Heat leungw Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 9 05-21-2013 09:29 PM
how to make this trim? chsdiyer Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 31 12-08-2012 06:58 PM
how to make wall trim look good chsdiyer Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 19 02-16-2012 02:57 PM
TRICKY spot -Chair rail + baseboard meeting 90 degree Door Trim K2a3m Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 8 09-02-2010 09:13 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome