Help trim proud jamb - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 02-09-2014, 12:36 PM Thread Starter
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Help trim proud jamb

Hola dust lovers, I recently gutted my 1920's craftsman bungalow and removed the dreaded plaster from every inch and having a tight budget reapplied 1/2" drywall and as a "I will deal with it later" motto have proud solid jambs that were flush with lath and plaster and now are making me think how can I trim them and not have to plane the jambs down because the jambs are level yet some of the drywall and walls were not. The proud jamb is +3/16".

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post #2 of 10 Old 02-09-2014, 12:44 PM
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Plane down some poplar to thickness as a backer for the molding you plan to use to bring it flush with the jamb overhang. You could oversize it and have a reveal all the way around, or undersize it and caulk/plaster the edge.
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post #3 of 10 Old 02-09-2014, 12:44 PM
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Build up your trim and rabbet to cover the jams.
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post #4 of 10 Old 02-09-2014, 06:31 PM
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I converted a entire house from plaster to drywall a couple years ago. Every window was like you have in your pictures. I used a Rockwell oscillating tool on each window. Put some blue tape on the wall to protect it and cut away. Takes about 2-3 minutes and you are flush. The door jamb might need another fix.

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post #5 of 10 Old 02-09-2014, 08:09 PM Thread Starter
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Good ideas guys. Thanks
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post #6 of 10 Old 02-09-2014, 10:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by builder64 View Post
Plane down some poplar to thickness as a backer for the molding you plan to use to bring it flush with the jamb overhang. You could oversize it and have a reveal all the way around, or undersize it and caulk/plaster the edge.
^ X2 Best way I know to do it.
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post #7 of 10 Old 02-10-2014, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by bonehed View Post
Build up your trim and rabbet to cover the jams.
I kinda like this one. Another thought - depending on what window style is appropriate to craftsman (and I'm not sure) would be banding all around - proud of the casing.

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post #8 of 10 Old 02-10-2014, 10:21 AM Thread Starter
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Yes, a proud L banding did surround the outside craftsman style original pine casing and I intended to use it. But I think today's real trendy designer market might just prefer to see cheap mdf painted... And building up overthe drywall with a underside caulk gap might be the fastest way to go.
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post #9 of 10 Old 02-10-2014, 10:24 AM Thread Starter
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Correction not all mdf is not cheap. But when you price a stick of 3/4"x5.5 oak at $3.50 a bf everything else seems like a steal!
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post #10 of 10 Old 03-08-2014, 02:33 PM
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You can plane off the jambs on the windows, but not on the door because the inside of the door has to be flush to the jambs. I agree with the others that replied to add a filler piece behind your casing to bring it to the same level as the jamb. You can buy mull strip at the lumber stores in different widths. It usually comes in 1/4" thicknesses. I would use that as the filler. You could run a 1/8" round over router bit along the outer edge to give a nice look to the filler pieces.
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