Help - inside miters not ligning up - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 26 Old 05-09-2010, 10:49 AM Thread Starter
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Help - inside miters not ligning up

Hey everyone. This is a very silly question I am sure but I am getting very frustrated so I need help.

I am trying to install baseboard trim around my newly finished basement. I have a simple miter saw (no compound) and I can not get the corners to line up. I stand the trim against the fence and set the saw to 45 degrees. When I go to install the pieces the top fits well but there is a gap at the bottom. If I flip the trim over, opposite problem. Please help, what am I doing wrong??
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post #2 of 26 Old 05-09-2010, 11:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schoolio View Post
Hey everyone. This is a very silly question I am sure but I am getting very frustrated so I need help.

I am trying to install baseboard trim around my newly finished basement. I have a simple miter saw (no compound) and I can not get the corners to line up. I stand the trim against the fence and set the saw to 45 degrees. When I go to install the pieces the top fits well but there is a gap at the bottom. If I flip the trim over, opposite problem. Please help, what am I doing wrong??

WELCOME TO THE FORUM

Inside corners should be coped for a good fit. Here is a good video showing how simple it is to do. For a description in text, click here.






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post #3 of 26 Old 05-09-2010, 12:10 PM
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First make sure your saw blade is square with your fence. Most corners in a house are not square. You would have to measure the angle in the corner & set your miter to half the angle for each cut to complete the corner. A trick I use for misalignment such as you describe is to use a drywall screw behind the corner as a stop to hold the corner piece square. Once lined up you can use a finish nails to attach. Easier if using a finish gun instead of hand nailing.

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post #4 of 26 Old 05-09-2010, 12:15 PM
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Welcome.

Your technique sounds completely correct so there must be an adjustment needed somewhere, BUT cabinetman has given you a MUCH better answer.

Paul

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post #5 of 26 Old 05-09-2010, 02:02 PM
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many drywallers love to install the panel sideways, leaving the tapered edge toward the bottom. this leaves a very difficult void to build up to the wall plane with mud, rarely done right. leaving the lower section "deeper" then the wall. you can check this with a straight edge. this may be your problem. regardless, i often use cardboard as a backer to fill in when this happens. i don't nail either side until i get it vertical, and coping is a must.

Last edited by TimPa; 05-09-2010 at 02:05 PM.
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post #6 of 26 Old 05-09-2010, 02:26 PM
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many drywallers love to install the panel sideways, leaving the tapered edge toward the bottom. this leaves a very difficult void to build up to the wall plane with mud, rarely done right. leaving the lower section "deeper" then the wall. you can check this with a straight edge. this may be your problem. regardless, i often use cardboard as a backer to fill in when this happens. i don't nail either side until i get it vertical, and coping is a must.
I agree with most of what is said here except that "coping is a must". While coping a joint is preferred by many, it is not the only way it can be done successfully. For myself I will cope most of the time, but there are times when I have used miters also.

In my own experience I have done it both ways cope or miter & have seen many examples of a mitered corner after many years not even hint at opening up. For some homeowners learning the skill of coping a piece of trim is hard to grasp. For them I would suggest a mitered joint.

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post #7 of 26 Old 05-09-2010, 09:53 PM
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Corners are rarely framed truly square (no offense to the framers out there). Even if it is framed square, the drywall mud will usually throw it off. Coping is a skill that can easily come, with time, patience and practice. When I tried doing base my first time, I tried mitering also. You didn't mention if you're going to paint or stain the base. Painted base is a little more forgiving, you can generally use a small amount of latex caulk to cover small imperfections. But if you are using hardwood base that will be stained, the fit has to be there. CH
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post #8 of 26 Old 05-10-2010, 09:35 AM
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"coping is a must" was probably strong for diy'ers or hobbyists. i am a contractor and installing mitered inside corners will spread (upon installation) more often then not. reason is you measure to the hard surface for the trim length, cut and install. when nailing, the pressure applied will push the trim/drywall/air space back, opening up the miter. i know it sounds smallish, but double it from both walls, now you have something that can be seen.
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post #9 of 26 Old 05-10-2010, 10:51 AM
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Cope, COPE...... COPE !

And
is the easiest way. (This is BASSWOOD showing us the way.)

Don't beat yourself to death with trying to make miters fit and stay together.

And you DO NOT need a compound saw for any of this.

Last edited by Willie T; 05-26-2010 at 11:08 PM.
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post #10 of 26 Old 05-10-2010, 07:39 PM
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C
O
P
E
NO UDDER WAY

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post #11 of 26 Old 05-10-2010, 10:02 PM
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Another trick is to plant a drywall screw down low on the corner behind the coped/mitred joint.
Use a screwdriver to tweak the vertical plane of the screw head and the upper level of the wall so the joint closes better.
Drywall screws are cheap and if the hollow of the drywall bevel edge is the issue, this will remove it.
Be sure to screw into the bottom plate so it holds its position.

The Pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity while the Optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty...
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post #12 of 26 Old 05-10-2010, 11:13 PM
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+1 -------> Cope inside

I hollow out the insides of the outsides:-)
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post #13 of 26 Old 05-26-2010, 12:06 AM
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By popular demand, I agree that coping is the answer to your troubles on this one. It's by far the better method of making your joints tight.
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post #14 of 26 Old 05-26-2010, 12:08 PM
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Cope and Butt

Schoolio,

Cope the joint. Even if your miter is dead on today, things move with time and many joints open and show gaps later.
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post #15 of 26 Old 05-27-2010, 11:51 PM
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Cope!!!!

i totally agree with coping... and oooohhhhh by the way coping with a grinder is alot harder than that cheater makes it look... funny how that weird lookin lil saw is called a "coping" saw??? coincidence? just my 2 cents....
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post #16 of 26 Old 05-28-2010, 03:44 AM
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CCC.

YEP. What other tool can you buy for under $10 that actually works? I saw some fancy coping jigs for jig saws and one for a router. Seemed "gadgety" and expensive, so I never bought one.

Anybody tried one of these? I remember wanting the router version. Seem to recall you had to make a template first from your base or crown profile.

Last edited by Cincinnati; 05-28-2010 at 03:45 AM. Reason: typo
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post #17 of 26 Old 05-28-2010, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCC View Post
i totally agree with coping... and oooohhhhh by the way coping with a grinder is alot harder than that cheater makes it look... funny how that weird lookin lil saw is called a "coping" saw??? coincidence? just my 2 cents....
And worth about the same?

Before you further stick your foot in your mouth , do just a little searching for "Basswood" (the 'cheater' in the video) and simply dream that your work was as good.

BTW you will find him on most any wood forum that you might want to mention. Few, if any have attained his level of expertise.
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post #18 of 26 Old 05-28-2010, 08:48 PM
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I use a Collins Coping Foot on my Bosch jig saw. It works very well.

James
Whittier, CA.

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post #19 of 26 Old 05-29-2010, 07:04 AM
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And worth about the same?

Before you further stick your foot in your mouth , do just a little searching for "Basswood" (the 'cheater' in the video) and simply dream that your work was as good.

BTW you will find him on most any wood forum that you might want to mention. Few, if any have attained his level of expertise.

ohh... i dont doubt that it takes skills that he obviously displays... slight sarcasm was used there...
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post #20 of 26 Old 05-29-2010, 11:00 AM
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ohh... i dont doubt that it takes skills that he obviously displays... slight sarcasm was used there...
My apologies. I consider him one of the best woodworkers I know, and I guess I took the 'cheater' part a little too sensitively.
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