Gaps under baseboard - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 32 Old 08-19-2011, 10:59 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice everyone!

It was a bit of work, but I've got all my baseboard scribed and trimmed. I used a planer and belt sander to trim the boards and that worked out well.

To install them, what size nails or brads should I be using? The molding is 3/8" by 3 1/4" red oak, and I'll rent a nailer.

How close to the end of a board can I nail safely? Should I use glue instead on the little pieces that are just an inch or two long?

Also, along my exterior walls, I was thinking of squirting some expanding latex foam into the crack between the floor and wall before installing the baseboard. My house is old and has no vapor barrier, so I thought this might be a good thing to do. Any thoughts on that?
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post #22 of 32 Old 08-20-2011, 09:13 AM
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No matter what route you decide to take Paul.Yer lookin at this whole thing all wrong.This is not an issue of havin a problem decidin on what to do about yer base board gap,it's an opportunity to go buy a new tool
I'd be undecided on whether to use a belt sander or a power plane, sooooo, the only obvious solution is to git both

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post #23 of 32 Old 08-20-2011, 05:22 PM Thread Starter
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I've already bought the power planer and belt sander. But you're saying I now need to buy the brad nailer? haha!
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post #24 of 32 Old 08-20-2011, 09:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul250 View Post
I've already bought the power planer and belt sander. But you're saying I now need to buy the brad nailer? haha!
Don't forget the small compressor & hose to go with it. You can buy it as a kit to save money. My wife would call that gift with purchase. You can't do that if you rent it.

James
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post #25 of 32 Old 08-22-2011, 09:16 PM
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23ga pin nailer will be best for the really small pieces and returns. maybe find a kit with the 18ga and 23ga?
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post #26 of 32 Old 08-23-2011, 06:20 PM
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Yes, fill the void before you put the molding up. Lifetime caulk, expanding foam, stuff in fiberglass, whatever it takes.

Bud

"Veggie burgers aren't bad if you put enough meat on them"
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post #27 of 32 Old 08-30-2011, 09:34 PM Thread Starter
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I used an 18 gauge brad nailer and it worked excellently. That is one of the best power tools: not only does it do a great job, it goes BAM!

Anyhow, I've got the nail holes filled and the final coat of varnish is drying.

Thanks for the advice, everyone!
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post #28 of 32 Old 09-04-2011, 02:43 PM
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backband

Sorry, but I don`t like the look...stopping the base (with a return) befor the backband

Never... I mean always... never mind Rick

Last edited by pianoman; 09-04-2011 at 02:48 PM. Reason: post reply in wrong area please delete RN
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post #29 of 32 Old 09-04-2011, 02:49 PM
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disreguard that last post

Wooops

Never... I mean always... never mind Rick
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post #30 of 32 Old 10-01-2011, 02:44 PM
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When working with oak, I have found that the easiest way for me to scribe to the floor (which is of course the best option. 1/32 is fine if you don't have a discerning eye. If you really want to impress people, leave absolutely no gaps) I will run my stock through a table saw and bevel the bottom of the material at a slight angle. For instance, if my largest gap is an 1/8, I will bevel the bottom of the stock at a 5 degree. Then I can even sand the excess after scribing with sandpaper and a sanding block. I suggest doing it this way because as Cabinetman said, planers and belt sanders can take off too much, too fast. Don't get in a hurry. The material you install will be there for a long time. Might as well make sure you did it right! :)

"No matter how many times I cut it, I am STILL too short!"
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post #31 of 32 Old 10-01-2011, 03:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul250 View Post
Thanks for the advice everyone!
...Should I use glue instead on the little pieces that are just an inch or two long?...
It isn't an inexpensive product and you dang well better be sure when you are using it but, http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&key...l_7iqtfdr5s2_e this stuff is amazing! I use it on all of my corner miter pieces now. I suggest the "Jel" I know, it's $40 and doesn't look like a lot, but you also don't need a lot. Then the $17 activator. I used to use the 23 gauge and still think it's a really good option.

"No matter how many times I cut it, I am STILL too short!"
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post #32 of 32 Old 10-01-2011, 03:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pianoman View Post
Sorry, but I don`t like the look...stopping the base (with a return) befor the backband
I believe you are talking about the uneven floor thread? Yes? I agree. My suggestion isn't the most ideal look. What IS the most ideal look is even transitions. Or as was mentioned later, no quarter round at all.

"No matter how many times I cut it, I am STILL too short!"
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