Gaps under baseboard - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 07:31 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Posts: 15
View Paul250's Photo Album My Photos
Gaps under baseboard

I'm installing some oak baseboard moldings, but the floor is not perfectly flat so there are some small gaps in places.

I can fix that by hand planing the baseboard to fit. How hard should I try to make it fit well? I want it to look good, but don't want to spend forever working on this project.

Would 1/32" gaps be fine, or should I try harder?

What would you consider to be an excellent fit?
Paul250 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 07:32 PM
In History is the Future
 
firemedic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: South Louisiana - Gonzales
Posts: 6,423
View firemedic's Photo Album My Photos
Will you be adding a toe moulding?... 1/4 round.

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
firemedic is offline  
post #3 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 07:34 PM
Scotty D
 
mdntrdr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: IL.
Posts: 4,479
View mdntrdr's Photo Album My Photos
You might wanna consider base shoe, it will conform much easier and add another element to your trim. It is almost always used on hardwood / vinyl / tile applications for just that reason.
Attached Images
 

Scott
OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

"Like" us on facebook
www.ScottyDsWoodworks.com
Watch Our YouTube Video

Last edited by mdntrdr; 07-19-2011 at 07:45 PM.
mdntrdr is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 08:35 PM
In History is the Future
 
firemedic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: South Louisiana - Gonzales
Posts: 6,423
View firemedic's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdntrdr
You might wanna consider base shoe, it will conform much easier and add another element to your trim. It is almost always used on hardwood / vinyl / tile applications for just that reason.
Base shoe - Shoe molding - toe molding... Funny how the things we use have so many different names! lol

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
firemedic is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to firemedic For This Useful Post:
mdntrdr (07-19-2011)
post #5 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 08:42 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdntrdr View Post
You might wanna consider base shoe, it will conform much easier and add another element to your trim. It is almost always used on hardwood / vinyl / tile applications for just that reason.
+1. I agree. It's available in a few sizes. Or, you can make your own.








.
cabinetman is offline  
post #6 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 08:52 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Posts: 15
View Paul250's Photo Album My Photos
Hmm, I had not been planning to install a base shoe.
Paul250 is offline  
post #7 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 08:55 PM
Scotty D
 
mdntrdr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: IL.
Posts: 4,479
View mdntrdr's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul250 View Post
Hmm, I had not been planning to install a base shoe.

Then I would scribe, and belt sand.

Good luck.

Scott
OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

"Like" us on facebook
www.ScottyDsWoodworks.com
Watch Our YouTube Video
mdntrdr is offline  
post #8 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 09:10 PM
Army Vet-Comic-Woodworker
 
Oak Tree Woodworks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 55
View Oak Tree Woodworks's Photo Album My Photos
Remember, Plan for expansion!
Oak Tree Woodworks is offline  
post #9 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 09:37 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Otautahi , Te WahiPounamu ( Christchurch , New Zealand)
Posts: 1,494
View Manuka Jock's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul250 View Post
I'm installing some oak baseboard moldings, but the floor is not perfectly flat so there are some small gaps in places.

I can fix that by hand planing the baseboard to fit. How hard should I try to make it fit well? I want it to look good, but don't want to spend forever working on this project.

Would 1/32" gaps be fine, or should I try harder?

What would you consider to be an excellent fit?
Paul ,
the solution is to scribe and then plane the bottom of the baseboard .
Fit the board into position , and temporary tack nail it if necessary.
Lay your pencil flat on the floor , checking first to see that the point touches the wood at the highest spot (the widest gap) . Starting at at one end , move it to the other end scribing a line that follows the floor line .
Plane the bottom edge of the baseboard to that line .
It is helpful to plane a slight undercut toward the rear , so the contact point is to the front .
If you have to join this board to another , either a running joint or an internal or external join , factor this into your scribing and planing at those points .

Quote:
Would 1/32" gaps be fine
If a board only has that tiny amount as it's widest gap , then undercut the whole length of the timber and see it that closes it up .




Jock

Last edited by Manuka Jock; 07-19-2011 at 09:51 PM.
Manuka Jock is offline  
post #10 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 09:43 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Otautahi , Te WahiPounamu ( Christchurch , New Zealand)
Posts: 1,494
View Manuka Jock's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by firemedic View Post
Base shoe - Shoe molding - toe molding... Funny how the things we use have so many different names! lol

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
We call then skirting's rather than baseboards



And we don't add a quarter round to the job , not if we can help it
Manuka Jock is offline  
post #11 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 11:35 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Posts: 15
View Paul250's Photo Album My Photos
Would a belt sander make the job a lot easier than a hand plane? It looks like small belt sanders start at around $100, which could be worth it as some of the boards will need a moderate amount of material removed to make them fit.

NB: the 1/32" was on one board, after I'd planed and undercut it.
Paul250 is offline  
post #12 of 32 Old 07-19-2011, 11:39 PM
Scotty D
 
mdntrdr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: IL.
Posts: 4,479
View mdntrdr's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdntrdr View Post
Then I would scribe, and belt sand.

Good luck.


Scott
OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

"Like" us on facebook
www.ScottyDsWoodworks.com
Watch Our YouTube Video
mdntrdr is offline  
post #13 of 32 Old 07-20-2011, 09:27 AM
Senior Member
 
TS3660's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ft. Mill, SC
Posts: 1,461
View TS3660's Photo Album My Photos
Yes, I would belt sand rather than plane. I put base in my house after I did the hardwood floor and there are some gaps here & there. I hated the idea of putting shoe mould down because it makes it harder to put dressers etc. tight to the wall. So, I just left the gaps. Some are 1/16" but I only noticed them as I was doing the job. Now the gaps are not there.

Bud

"Veggie burgers aren't bad if you put enough meat on them"
TS3660 is offline  
post #14 of 32 Old 07-21-2011, 07:10 AM
Senior Member
 
tcleve4911's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Vermont & Maine
Posts: 1,967
View tcleve4911's Photo Album My Photos
This is a perfect time to consider a power planer.
It can follow your scribe line perfectly and put a backcut on it effortlessly by just tilting it as you run the edge. You can adjust the depth of cut from really having to take off a lot, to just fine tuning a finished edge.
Belt sanding is dusty and takes forever with large scribes.

You can also use it for many other purposes. Shaving doors, putting a finished edge on a milled piece of trim, dressing small pieces of rough lumber...

I bought the Bosch with the replaceable carbide blades. Carbide is the key to this tool.

Learning more about tools everyday
tcleve4911 is offline  
post #15 of 32 Old 07-21-2011, 07:33 AM
Really underground garage
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: mnts of Va
Posts: 2,552
View BWSmith's Photo Album My Photos
Tall,6...8...and 10 inch base here at the house,1/4 sawn SYP(southern yeller pine).No shoe......its a very clean look.And considering above base species is a downright PIA sometimes.I use a razor sharp #3 Stanley and just get on with it.

On really tall base's,anything over 6 or so....theres one particular profile for shoe that stands out in historic house/building world.It for all practical reason is the same as an OG doorstop.....not the narrow ones,the ones that are about 1 1/4 wide X 1/2" thick.And heres the kicker;one that most simply can't process till they see it "live"..........is,more often than not the "shoe"(which is really miniture basebd)is painted Black.Next time you see the president giving a speech from W-House....look at the shoe.Its as described above.

The "notion" of it being Black is based(ha) on the fact that there IS a perceptable "line" if you will around rm where base hits flr.Irrespective of whether or not theres any shoe.Shadow lines are....wait for it,Black.Hence this is why we do Black shoe.It makes that line disappear.Don't take my word for it....start looking for it.BW

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
BWSmith is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to BWSmith For This Useful Post:
mdntrdr (07-21-2011)
post #16 of 32 Old 07-21-2011, 07:47 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Scribing the bottom of base moulding can change the overall height. This can be problematic when there are return walls. Understanding what scribing is, makes this clear. If a base moulding shows gaps, the high areas (places where it touches) have to be cut down to allow the areas with gaps to close up. Done right it has a very clean look.

Using a belt sander or a power planer can take off too much, too fast.








.
cabinetman is offline  
post #17 of 32 Old 07-21-2011, 08:20 AM
Really underground garage
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: mnts of Va
Posts: 2,552
View BWSmith's Photo Album My Photos
Yup C-man........thats deffinately "at issue".You have to run around the rm where this the most prevelant with a straightedge.We use a 1/4X2X72" Aluminum pce......just checking.Locating "trouble" spots as early as possible.Its a step that pays for itself later in the install..........only takes a few minutes.Don't do it and......ok wheres the caulking,Haha.BW

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
BWSmith is offline  
post #18 of 32 Old 07-21-2011, 09:26 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Otautahi , Te WahiPounamu ( Christchurch , New Zealand)
Posts: 1,494
View Manuka Jock's Photo Album My Photos
Yep , the issue has already been covered a few posts back .
Thanks for agreeing with me tho
Manuka Jock is offline  
post #19 of 32 Old 07-21-2011, 07:42 PM
Really underground garage
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: mnts of Va
Posts: 2,552
View BWSmith's Photo Album My Photos
Am waiting on fresh corn on the cob to finish,pulled Pork is done.....this is a corner in DR.Look at the space between backband and termination of base........theres a space there.IF,shoe was installed it would be 45'd and die into this space.Theres some other things going on with casing and rm but just wanted to show how a little planning can really speed up the effort later.Cobweb's optional,BW
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Basebd 001.jpg
Views:	2420
Size:	69.8 KB
ID:	26739  


Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
BWSmith is offline  
post #20 of 32 Old 07-21-2011, 09:06 PM
Senior Sawdust Producer
 
Leo G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Windsor Locks, Connecticut
Posts: 4,356
View Leo G's Photo Album My Photos
1/32" is fine

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
Finishing is 3 parts chemistry and 1 part VooDoo http://lrgwood.com
Leo G is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Filling gaps in Island Butcher Block Scoots General Woodworking Discussion 1 12-31-2010 09:21 PM
How to fill small gaps in MDF? kthode85 Wood Finishing 5 10-15-2010 04:00 PM
Resin & Pigment to fill gaps and cracks? gideon Wood Finishing 4 05-27-2010 03:23 PM
Filling Gaps/Cracks/Splits PeckerWood Wood Finishing 19 04-14-2010 08:13 PM
Baseboard Questions leted_82 Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 25 11-22-2008 11:18 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome