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post #1 of 12 Old 02-08-2013, 08:59 AM Thread Starter
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Gap

Not exactly sure what section to post this in

I needed to replace some trim work where part of my old house meets my addition, and after removal of the 1.75" wide x .25" thick piece of stock i discovered a gap that travels from the floor to the doorway (around 6.5') on both sides. Ideally id like to fill this in and make it smooth all the way up. Gap is less than 1/4" wide at its widest point, and is only that wide for a small portion. What would be the best way to do this? Wood filler? drywall tape/mud? Any suggestions?!

thanks guys
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post #2 of 12 Old 02-08-2013, 09:10 AM
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Bondo can be you're buddy.
Scrape and rough sand the area so it's relatively smooth.
Remove as much dust as you can.
Mix up only enough bondo you can spread before it dries.
Plan on multiple coats.

Tip: you can shave the high spots off the bondo very easily if you let it set up and then pare it off with a sharp chisel before it gets completely hard
It beats the heck out of sanding.

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post #3 of 12 Old 02-08-2013, 09:14 AM
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Bondo is a great friend, I suggest letting it set for 2-3 min. them running a surform drywall rasp over it, then just needs a little sanding. you might also put some expansion foam or backer rod in.
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post #4 of 12 Old 02-08-2013, 11:02 AM Thread Starter
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I have no experience with bondo to date- tough product to use?

sounds like some expansion foam is a great idea to give the bondo something to hold onto- thank you!
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post #5 of 12 Old 02-08-2013, 12:36 PM
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Make sure you have a clean surface for it to bond to. Just read the label. The redder you mix it, the "hotter" it is. Go for a fleshy tone. Its cake to work with once you get the hang of it. Just be sure to mix it up completely. Also, don't use the top to mix it in. I use a scrap piece of plywood. I find it easier to get completely mixed together. One of my first carpenters I worked with used to say how much he loved the smell of bondo in the morning...
Good Luck.
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post #6 of 12 Old 02-08-2013, 09:22 PM
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I don't think expansion foam. I think backer rod. I've had experience with expansion foam expanding things out of whack. A strip of backer rod is also a lot cheaper than a can of foam. I agree with the Bondo. Great stuff, shallow learning curve.
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post #7 of 12 Old 02-09-2013, 01:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe5986 View Post
I have no experience with bondo to date- tough product to use?

sounds like some expansion foam is a great idea to give the bondo something to hold onto- thank you!
It's very easy.
The bondo is gray and the hardener is red.
When you mix it, it's very easy to see that it's thoroughly blended just by looking at the color uniformity.
Don't mix more that you can apply in a short period of time.

I like using scraps of melamine or laminate to mix it on.
Plywood seems to suck the moisture out of it making it dry quicker than I want.

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post #8 of 12 Old 02-11-2013, 12:41 PM
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since this is an area that may require movement, i would opt for a product that doesn't harden (like bondo). I would probably spend some time getting a full crack of paintable caulk (big stretch), then paint it. or, maybe put trim back on.
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post #9 of 12 Old 02-11-2013, 01:11 PM
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Is use low expanding foam. Put tape over the gap, inject foam through the tape every foot or two, let it dry and remove the tape and you'll have a flat and insulated gap.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #10 of 12 Old 02-21-2013, 07:08 PM
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Bondo for sure as a filler. Fill and glue with wood first, then Bondo. Recess wood slightly though. Sand, prime, then paint
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post #11 of 12 Old 02-21-2013, 07:14 PM
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Bondo for sure as a filler. Fill and glue with wood first, then Bondo. Recess wood slightly though. Sand, prime, then paint. If there is lots of movement in the joint, you Probably should think about putting the strip back on. Nail one side and let the other float. Fill the gap with foam
And or caulk
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post #12 of 12 Old 02-22-2013, 05:55 PM
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I agree with windygorge, bondo is a really good filler but the gap shown is too big. Large amounts of bondo can crack especially on wood. I would fill as much of the gap as possible with wood first before using bondo.
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