Crown, Vaulted ceiling Odd Corner how do i finish? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 26 Old 08-21-2013, 09:54 AM Thread Starter
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Crown, Vaulted ceiling Odd Corner how do i finish?

I have vaulted cielings in my great room and flat cieling in my kitchen i just put crown in both but i have an odd corner where there is three pieces of crown meet together and i am not sure how to remedy. view pictures to see what i am talking about. the kitchen is a flat cieling, the great room is vaulted if i run a continuous piece into the kitchen there will be a gap in the great room crown at the cieling of about 1-2 inches at the corner. right now i have the kitchen and the one of the great room runs returned at the ends to at the farthest extent possible. looking for ideas of how to procede. i was thinking of doing a block in this corner but i don't want it to define the two different rooms and i don't have a block any where else in the rooms.
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post #2 of 26 Old 08-21-2013, 10:12 AM
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The only way I see to make that look normal is to put a column there where the different ceilings meet and just die the molding into the column.
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post #3 of 26 Old 08-21-2013, 10:27 AM Thread Starter
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The only way I see to make that look normal is to put a column there where the different ceilings meet and just die the molding into the column.
are you talking about a floor to ceiling column to separate the two rooms? like a 4 inch deep faux column to separate the two spaces and have the two pieces of crown run into that? I think that could work but the i believe that part of the ceiling overhangs the great room carpet and not the kitchen hardwood so that would trade a ceiling oddity for a floor one. i will have to check when i get home tonight to be sure.

What about a flint block or Key any ideas on that?
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post #4 of 26 Old 08-21-2013, 11:13 AM
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That's a tough intersection. It may be the easiest and cleanest arrangement to merge the mouldings. As in the picture below, continue "B" to "A" and finish the run, if you are going past that.

Trim "D's" bottom edge to fit the horizontal edge, and fit to "C".

Cope it to fit "B/A". If you aren't going into the "A" area from "B", make a small pendant.
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post #5 of 26 Old 08-21-2013, 05:57 PM
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Originally Posted by brad4g63 View Post
are you talking about a floor to ceiling column to separate the two rooms? like a 4 inch deep faux column to separate the two spaces and have the two pieces of crown run into that? I think that could work but the i believe that part of the ceiling overhangs the great room carpet and not the kitchen hardwood so that would trade a ceiling oddity for a floor one. i will have to check when i get home tonight to be sure.

What about a flint block or Key any ideas on that?
Yes I did mean a floor to ceiling column but looking at the pictures again I think a short length of wall like this would be better as long as you didn't try to wrap the crown all the way around like this one. It looks like you need 10" to 12" of fill to reach the crown molding going up the ceiling.

I'm not familar with the term flint block. If its something like a crown molding corner block it would have to be a pretty big one. I'm not sure that would look right.
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post #6 of 26 Old 08-21-2013, 10:36 PM
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Maybe there would be some help on this website. This guy is good and has lots of crown molding challenges explained.

http://compoundmiter.com/

I have his book and it has helped figure out a future crown molding challenge.

George
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post #7 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 07:17 AM
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You say you do not want to define the two rooms, the difference in the ceiling type and floor covering already defines the two rooms. My suggestion would be to build a stub wall from the kitchen ceiling down to the height of a archway. That would give you 16" and the crown in the great room could then continue on to the wall. On the kitchen side you would then complete the crown around the room. The grate on the wall to the extreme right in the first picture may present a challenge doing what I suggest but is solvable.

I do not believe there is any other way to solve the challenge you have now.

George
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post #8 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 07:56 AM
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This is tough. I would continue the crown from B to A horizontally into the adjoining room. I would let the angle crown C to "die" in to the horizontal run where it would taper off. A mockup would allow you to see if that will work to your satisfaction.

A vertical post will just call attention to the issue and stop the eye at that point rather than allowing it to disappear visually. It may not be the ideal solution, but I doubt if there is one. Any time an acute angle is part of the design it's an automatic eye stopper, but in this case adding to the issue won't really help....JMO.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-22-2013 at 08:00 AM.
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post #9 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 08:10 AM
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This is tough. I would continue the crown from B to A horizontally into the adjoining room. I would let the angle crown C to "die" in to the horizontal run where it would taper off. A mockup would allow you to see if that will work to your satisfaction.
How is that different than post #4?






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post #10 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 08:18 AM
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This is tough. I would continue the crown from B to A horizontally into the adjoining room. I would let the angle crown C to "die" in to the horizontal run where it would taper off. A mockup would allow you to see if that will work to your satisfaction.

A vertical post will just call attention to the issue and stop the eye at that point rather than allowing it to disappear visually. It may not be the ideal solution, but I doubt if there is one. Any time an acute angle is part of the design it's an automatic eye stopper, but in this case adding to the issue won't really help....JMO.
If you continue piece C to meet piece B extended to point A the back side of piece C will be exposed with no wall behind it on the kitchen side. How would that be dealt with?

Perhaps I am missing something but I have installed many challenging pieces of crown molding and I see no way to make this work other than perhaps what I suggested in post #7.


George
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post #11 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 08:23 AM
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If you continue piece C to meet piece B extended to point A the back side of piece C will be exposed with no wall behind it on the kitchen side. How would that be dealt with?
George
As I suggested in post #4...Trim "D's" bottom edge to fit the horizontal edge, and fit to "C". Cope it to fit "B/A".







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post #12 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 08:29 AM
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As I suggested in post #4...Trim "D's" bottom edge to fit the horizontal edge, and fit to "C". Cope it to fit "B/A".







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Guess I am missing something. Won't you loose the part of D that rests against the wall if you trim it to the horizontal? Also it wouldn't it come to a point and would not need coping, it would just disappear.

George
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post #13 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 09:03 AM
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Guess I am missing something. Won't you loose the part of D that rests against the wall if you trim it to the horizontal?
Yes.

Also it wouldn't it come to a point and would not need coping, it would just disappear.
More than likely.






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post #14 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 09:21 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by George G View Post
You say you do not want to define the two rooms, the difference in the ceiling type and floor covering already defines the two rooms. My suggestion would be to build a stub wall from the kitchen ceiling down to the height of a archway. That would give you 16" and the crown in the great room could then continue on to the wall. On the kitchen side you would then complete the crown around the room. The grate on the wall to the extreme right in the first picture may present a challenge doing what I suggest but is solvable.

I do not believe there is any other way to solve the challenge you have now.

George
Sry my terminology is a bit outdated i was talking about a corner block, what i meant by not trying to define the two rooms was a want to keep the open concept as open as possible and biulding a sophet to support the crown going across would be a little more than i am looking for at this point.
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post #15 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 09:46 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by George G View Post
If you continue piece C to meet piece B extended to point A the back side of piece C will be exposed with no wall behind it on the kitchen side. How would that be dealt with?

Perhaps I am missing something but I have installed many challenging pieces of crown molding and I see no way to make this work other than perhaps what I suggested in post #7.


George

I think i am going to taper run c along the horizontal edge into the corner, just curious baout how to make this taper. i know i am going to use a table saw for the main taper but if the run followed the same line as the rest of run c you could look strait up and see the back of the crown in that corner any ideas on how to make this piece.
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post #16 of 26 Old 08-22-2013, 09:52 AM
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I think i am going to taper run c along the horizontal edge into the corner, just curious baout how to make this taper. i know i am going to use a table saw for the main taper but if the run followed the same line as the rest of run c you could look strait up and see the back of the crown in that corner any ideas on how to make this piece.
I would fit "B/A" first, and then fit "D" to "C". Then draw a line on the back side along the horizontal edge. Cut to fit. Caulk or spackle the bottom edge.






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post #17 of 26 Old 08-23-2013, 02:28 PM Thread Starter
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just another question what about the gap between run a and the ceiling?
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post #18 of 26 Old 08-23-2013, 03:54 PM
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just another question what about the gap between run a and the ceiling?
Hard to tell what gap from looking at a picture. You will have to do some fitments to see.






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post #19 of 26 Old 08-23-2013, 04:04 PM
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it's the white area in the photo

The slanted ceiling rises above and away from the top of the crown which projects from the wall leaving the dreaded "gap".

Maybe I'll reconsider my objection to a plith block to stop all the moldings and allow for a new start in the adjoining room.
http://images.search.yahoo.com/searc...a=plinth+block

Or:
http://images.search.yahoo.com/searc...g+terminations

http://thejoyofmoldings.com/three-wa...crown-molding/

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-23-2013 at 04:06 PM.
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post #20 of 26 Old 08-23-2013, 05:02 PM
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just another question what about the gap between run a and the ceiling?
I would make a pendant to fit that will intersect the merging of the mouldings. It can be made to fit up to the ceiling at "A", so that run will have no gap.
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