Crown Moulding - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 09-01-2007, 11:05 AM Thread Starter
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Crown Moulding

I have volunteered to help a frien install crwon moulding. I spent hours on the web looking for an answer. My question is WHY do you have to turn the moulding upside down in the mitre box? What is the rational for this? Why can't I cut it as it would look up on the wall? I understand the logic in reversing the 45 degree business from right to left etc. I just wanted to know WHY. DO you get a better 45 degree cut doing it upside down?

Thanks to all!!

John
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post #2 of 6 Old 09-01-2007, 04:17 PM
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It has to do with spacial relationships and quantum

physics. The real reason is that it is easier and safer to control the molding as you cut it. If you place it vertically in the miter saw with the viewed surface towards you, the edge that connects to the ceiling is standing out in space. There are several ways to attack this project but the easiest I have found is by using the crown molding miter jig available at rockler.com. You set it for the molding you are using and it supports the material in the saw at the proper angle while you make your cut.

Ed
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post #3 of 6 Old 09-02-2007, 07:07 AM
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If you place it vertically in the miter saw with the viewed surface towards you, the edge that connects to the ceiling is standing out in space.
Ed

There are alternative ways of cutting crown other than flat to the table. The intermittent degrees for miter and bevel may vary from the factory notches, or markings. Setting to the exact degree may be off slightly. If the crown is standing as it is positioned on the wall/ceiling, that angle is perfect. Then the only angle to cut is the 45 deg. About having the moulding "out in the air", a wedge can be cut for a rear support, which I have done for years. Setting the cut mark is also very easy. Or, if the piece is turned around, it will still be at the positioning angle, and 45's only have to be cut, as in this diagram:
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post #4 of 6 Old 09-02-2007, 06:48 PM
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Hey Cabinetman. I'm getting the feeling

that you are attempting to school me but the lesson you are teaching is exactly what I was attempting to get across, perhaps poorly. The fixture I referred to from rockler holds the molding just as you depicted in you sketch and is easily used on either side of the blade, no tools required. It has two thumb screws that allow you to adjust it to the run of molding you are using and go.

Ed
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post #5 of 6 Old 09-02-2007, 09:37 PM
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that you are attempting to school me but the lesson you are teaching is exactly what I was attempting to get across, perhaps poorly. The fixture I referred to from rockler holds the molding just as you depicted in you sketch and is easily used on either side of the blade, no tools required. It has two thumb screws that allow you to adjust it to the run of molding you are using and go.

Ed

Ed - Me school you...I wouldn't think of it. I will say that there isn't a woodworking procedure that necessitates buying a jig. Maybe a lot of newcomers to woodworking get the feeling from forums that they have to run out and buy this and that in order to do certain procedures. Some jigs can be shop made. Now that is the challenge that makes woodworking a craft. Being able to figure out how to do things in a safe and expeditious way is part and parcel of woodworking. For professionals that require the fastest way to do a certain procedure maybe a store bought jig would be the answer.
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post #6 of 6 Old 09-04-2007, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by johno View Post
I have volunteered to help a frien install crwon moulding. I spent hours on the web looking for an answer. My question is WHY do you have to turn the moulding upside down in the mitre box? What is the rational for this? Why can't I cut it as it would look up on the wall? I understand the logic in reversing the 45 degree business from right to left etc. I just wanted to know WHY. DO you get a better 45 degree cut doing it upside down?

Thanks to all!!

John
to answer your question,yes you get a better miter holding it upside down and most miter saws come with a jig for holding the mould in that manner.it is much easier than placing it as it would go on the wall/ceiling with a block behind it and the fence.not to mention that measuring and marking the mould is also better in that manner being that yiou can see your marks on the bottom of the crown that would otherwise be covered up if you placed it on the table as it goes on the wall.hope it makes since as i have already had three glasses of a nice cabernet, and today at work ran about 600' of crown mould.i love running crown,it is such a money maker.
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