Crown molding jigs - yeah or neigh? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 21 Old 08-15-2011, 01:48 PM Thread Starter
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Crown molding jigs - yeah or neigh?

I have been planning to put up some crown molding in our kitchen, but not having done it before, I have to say I am gunshy about the project. Further, the kitchen has a few funky angles that I know will be tricky. So I've looked at some of these jigs offered here and there, but see some wildly mixed reviews on them. Is it better to just do it the old fashioned way or are these jigs of use? FYI, I have a Ridgid 12" CMS and it has some crown molding instructions on it and built in miter stops, but I have yet to actually try it for fear of botching expensive molding. I think it only bevels/tilts in one direction though...to the right maybe?

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post #2 of 21 Old 08-15-2011, 02:59 PM
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I've never used a jig or a stop.

Cut your crown upsidedown.

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OH, wait a minute ............Yep!.............That's what he said!

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post #3 of 21 Old 08-15-2011, 06:57 PM
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check on you tube there are several videos showing how to cut ceiling molding. It really isn't that hard at all.

http://www.diychatroom.com/

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post #4 of 21 Old 08-15-2011, 07:26 PM
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Check out this thread, post #3.








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post #5 of 21 Old 08-17-2011, 07:31 AM
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I prefer nay, but that's just me. I've cut a LOT of crown and I've found that if you watch what you're doing, know the marked stops on you CMS and know your spring angle, there's no need to buy any jigs.

Ut Prosim
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post #6 of 21 Old 08-17-2011, 10:54 AM
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This spring angle thing, did someone just come up with that out of thin air? I have been installing ceiling mold since before there was electric miter saws and never heard of that before. One thing that gets me goofed up is putting full 1/4 round on the ceiling, (like on a front porch) there is no top or bottom to that stuff.

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post #7 of 21 Old 08-17-2011, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
This spring angle thing, did someone just come up with that out of thin air? I have been installing ceiling mold since before there was electric miter saws and never heard of that before. One thing that gets me goofed up is putting full 1/4 round on the ceiling, (like on a front porch) there is no top or bottom to that stuff.
since 1/4 round is never perfect, i run a pencil mark on one flat side of it full length as ref.
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post #8 of 21 Old 08-17-2011, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
This spring angle thing, did someone just come up with that out of thin air? I have been installing ceiling mold since before there was electric miter saws and never heard of that before. One thing that gets me goofed up is putting full 1/4 round on the ceiling, (like on a front porch) there is no top or bottom to that stuff.
Can't tell about how things come about. It was likely some guy that had an inner ear problem, and was out of balance, and thought crown looked better at a weird angle.

I never really worried about the angle because the way I cut it, it doesn't matter. I have machined a 45 on crown and it doesn't look bad. For the 1/4 round, if there is some pitch, you have a problem. I usually machine a different angle other than the 90 to fit a lesser degree, like backcutting.





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post #9 of 21 Old 08-17-2011, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
since 1/4 round is never perfect, i run a pencil mark on one flat side of it full length as ref.
Well for crying out loud, that is just too simple, why in the world didn't I think of that? Thanks

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post #10 of 21 Old 08-17-2011, 05:23 PM
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I purchasd a jig....Bench Dog jig I believe it's called. It's easy for some but I seem to have A.D.D. and lose track of which way I am supposed to be cutting. This jig has pictures as easy reference so takes my thinking out of play....which is a good thing. My brother-in-law doesn't even use a measuring tape when he cuts crown molding, he must have some magic powers because I've seen he hang some 6" crown and it was flawless. Bench Dog....I think I paid $20 for it a few years ago.
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post #11 of 21 Old 08-18-2011, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
This spring angle thing, did someone just come up with that out of thin air?

Yeah, I don't know how long it's been around, but I've been installing it for just over 10 years in various houses and it's been around THAT long at least.

I'm not trying to talk down to you, Jiju, as I firmly believe you understand WHY there are different angles, but this may help some passerby understand:

It's for different height ceilings (walls really). On a lower ceiling, you'd want the crown to tilt up to better reveal the detail in the crown, so a 38 degree SA would be your choice.

Similarly, on a high ceiling, you choose a 45 or 52 degree spring angle so the crown is more prominant and tilts out towards the floor.

Ut Prosim
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post #12 of 21 Old 08-18-2011, 02:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taylormade View Post
Yeah, I don't know how long it's been around, but I've been installing it for just over 10 years in various houses and it's been around THAT long at least.

I'm not trying to talk down to you, Jiju, as I firmly believe you understand WHY there are different angles, but this may help some passerby understand:

It's for different height ceilings (walls really). On a lower ceiling, you'd want the crown to tilt up to better reveal the detail in the crown, so a 38 degree SA would be your choice.

Similarly, on a high ceiling, you choose a 45 or 52 degree spring angle so the crown is more prominant and tilts out towards the floor.
Well you can teach an ole dog new tricks, I knew there were different molds that had different angles I just didn't know that was what a spring angle was. I appreciate you clearing that up for me.
It looks like I would have known that after 42 years of installing that stuff.

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post #13 of 21 Old 08-31-2011, 03:28 PM
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I put up some crown molding in my bedroom and used a system where I did not have to worry about any angled cuts at all. I used decorative blocks at all the inside and outside corners and it really turned out nice. Check out this article that covers how I did it. http://www.firehow.com/2010060815763...ered-cuts.html.
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post #14 of 21 Old 09-01-2011, 07:38 AM
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Jigs assume every corner/wall is 90deg and perfectly flat, something that you will never find.
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post #15 of 21 Old 09-01-2011, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the feedback. Looks like I will forego the jig and just "Do It!"

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post #16 of 21 Old 09-03-2011, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
Jigs assume every corner/wall is 90deg and perfectly flat, something that you will never find.
I actually have a jig called "cut n crown". It works with any degree you find in a corner. Does vaulted ceilings as well. Also comes with a jig for each spring angle. I can cut crown without it, but the jig helps eliminate some error that can be caused by holing is upside down.
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post #17 of 21 Old 10-01-2011, 02:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aris View Post
I put up some crown molding in my bedroom and used a system where I did not have to worry about any angled cuts at all. I used decorative blocks at all the inside and outside corners and it really turned out nice. Check out this article that covers how I did it. http://www.firehow.com/2010060815763...ered-cuts.html.

It's an aesthetic choice I suppose. I will tell you whenever I see corner blocks, I know they were used by people that don't know how to install crown. I have seen crown molding reduce grown men to tears. I am not so sure it is really that "easy." It took me a few years to understand that I needed to flip my brain inside out and turn it around in order to get it done right. Walls are NEVER square and imperfections in framing can VASTLY affect the look of crown after it is all said and done. I am wondering, am I the only carpenter here who copes his crown?

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post #18 of 21 Old 10-01-2011, 03:31 PM
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No Trimguy , you are not alone.
I cope all internal corners on everything from quarter round to basic scotia to multiple detail crown.
In my day we were taught to with a tenon saw and a coping saw .
Even the external miters were hand cut with the tenon , undercut with the coping , and fine tuned with the plane .
The same with skirting boards , dado rails , barge boards , weather boards etc , all done by hand .
Power tools did not come into it until some years after I was out of my apprenticeship .
Actually most of the houses we built did not have the power on at that stage anyway , for some reason the linesmen were dragging the chain

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post #19 of 21 Old 11-03-2011, 01:10 PM
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The first thread question was whether the jigs are a good idea. The experienced woodworkers said these jigs aren't necessary. But I think that's the point. Without a jig, I've done some fair crown molding, but that's been only a few times every couple years. With a jig, a novice like me got much better results, and spent a lot less time doing it.
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post #20 of 21 Old 11-03-2011, 03:45 PM
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The first thread question was whether the jigs are a good idea. The experienced woodworkers said these jigs aren't necessary. But I think that's the point. Without a jig, I've done some fair crown molding, but that's been only a few times every couple years. With a jig, a novice like me got much better results, and spent a lot less time doing it.
It doesn't matter what a person uses as long as they are comfortable with the method they use and make the mold look good. I think it is great that there are jigs out there to help folks who don't do trim for a living.

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